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Center for Science in the Public Interest

AKA CSPI

Washington, DC

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Fiscal Year Starting: July 1, 2012
Fiscal Year Ending: June 30, 2013
Revenue
Total Revenue $19,595,524
Expenses
Total Expenses $19,582,560

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Basic Organization Information

Center for Science in the Public Interest

Also Known As:
CSPI
Physical Address:
Washington, DC 20005 
EIN:
23-7122879
Web URL:
www.cspinet.org 
NTEE Category:
K Agriculture, Food, Nutrition 
K01 Alliance/Advocacy Organizations 
W Public, Society Benefit 
W90 Consumer Protection and Safety 
Ruling Year:
1971 
How This Organization Is Funded:
Subscriptions to Nutrition Action Healthletter - $11,834,252
Contributions from Members - $4,964,030
Foundation Grants - $1,462,044

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Mission Statement

CSPI is a consumer advocacy organization whose twin missions are to conduct innovative research and advocacy programs in health and nutrition, and to provide consumers with current, useful information about their health and well-being.

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Financial Data

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Revenue and Expenses

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Balance Sheet

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Forms 990 Provided by the Nonprofit

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Financial Statements

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Annual Reports

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Leadership (GuideStar ExchangeThe GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more. February, 2014)

Dr. Michael F. Jacobson

Profile:

Michael F. Jacobson, Ph.D., is CSPI's Co-founder and Executive Director. After earning a doctorate in microbiology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he came to Washington, D.C. to do research on food additives. His interest in nutrition and food safety -- and his career as a consumer advocate -- had begun. Since CSPI's creation in 1971, Dr. Jacobson has worked diligently to bring Americans safer, more nutritious food.

Leadership Statement:

Over the past 43 years, the CSPI staff and I have been called many things – from “food police” on the one hand to “the nation’s leading watchdog group for nutrition and health.” But whether folks are calling us names or singing our praises, we get their attention and we spur needed changes. CSPI has built a national reputation for scientific honesty and impeccable credibility among the media, policy makers, and the general public. That has enabled CSPI to reach millions of consumers with lifesaving information on how to make safer, healthier food choices and to build citizen power to prod our government to stand up to the strong-arm tactics of industry. In a society where a company may spend $25 million to advertise a single candy bar, it has been very gratifying to me to see how a small organization like CSPI has been able to leverage its modest resources to improve the lives of millions of people and to alter the practices of multi-billion-dollar corporations. Today, CSPI has a full-time staff of 60, including several in Canada, and an annual budget of $20 million. And CSPI’s Nutrition Action Healthletter brings the latest nutrition and health news and advice to more than 900,000 members, subscribers, national policymakers, and key journalists. We have much work to do: More than half of American adults are overweight or obese. Tens of millions of people experience food poisoning each year, and thousands die. Meanwhile, antibiotics are losing their effectiveness and biotechnology is promising new benefits -- and risks. Government and industry too often turn a blind eye to the problems that they have created or tolerated. CSPI will continue to correct that and to work for healthier people and a cleaner environment by educating consumers, improving corporate practices, and promoting enlightened government policies – all through the use of science in the public interest.



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Program: Nutrition Policy

Budget:
$534,467
Category:
None
Population Served:
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
Adults
None

Program Description:

CSPI is leading efforts to improve school food nationally and reduce the amount of junk food advertising aimed at kids. CSPI is also working to improve food and beverage options in government buildings and other work spaces.

Program Long-Term Success:

Program Short-Term Success:

Program Success Monitored by:

The number of improved policies set by cities, states, and the federal government aimed to improve children's nutrition.

Program Success Examples:

The passage of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) of 2010 exemplifies the victories the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) has been winning for Americans since 1971. That historic and sweeping legislation set 21st-century nutrition standards for meals served daily to more than 30 million children, an increasing number of whom depend on them as their main meals each day. HHFKA increases access to healthy foods (and drinking water) in schools and reduces the availability of unhealthy foods through vending, school stores, and other venues. The new school meal rules, which went into effect the 2012/2013 school year: *double fruit and vegetable servings and increase the variety of vegetables; *set first-ever standards for sodium, trans fat, and whole grains; *require all the milk to be low-fat or fat-free; and *set calorie standards that address not only hunger but also overweight and obesity.

Program: Food Safety

Budget:
$694,008
Category:
None
Population Served:
Adults
Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program Description:

Consumers are vulnerable to a variety of pathogens because of tainted meat and produce in the food supply. CSPI challenges companies to ensure that our food is safe, and advocates for strong government oversight of food safety practices. Our staff is also working hard to eliminate the use of artificial dyes from the food supply, as many are are carcinogenic and can exacerbate symptoms of ADHD in children.

Program Long-Term Success:

Significant reduction in the number of food-poisoning outbreaks caused by bacteria such as Salmonella and E. Coli. Also, to secure funding for an Institute of Medicine study on the effects of food dyes.     Increase inspection of imported foods and decrease the number of food-poisoning incidents related to foreign foods.

Program Short-Term Success:

Program Success Monitored by:

Number of improved rules and regulations adopted, increase appropriations for food inspections, and a decrease in food poisoning incidents. Also, number of companies that cease the use of artificial food dyes.

Program Success Examples:

Over the last decade CSPI has convinced Congress to more than double the food inspection budget. CSPI also led the efforts to pass the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2011, which gave the FDA its first major overhaul in 70 years.

Program: Deceptive Food Labeling & Advertising

Budget:
$747,342
Category:
None
Population Served:
Adults
Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program Description:

Food labels play an important role is safeguarding consumers from obesity and other diet-related diseases. That’s why CSPI works hard to ensure that foods and dietary supplements are advertised and labeled honestly.

Program Long-Term Success:

A significant reduction in misleading and deceptive food advertisements and labeling.

Program Short-Term Success:

Program Success Monitored by:

A decline in the number of misleading and deceptive food labels and ads.

Program Success Examples:

Over the years, CSPI has halted deceptive ads or labels by McDonald’s, KFC, Campbell Soup, Kraft, Kellogg, Quaker Oats, and the beef, pork, and coffee industries, to name just a few.

Program: Public Education/Nutrition Action Healthletter

Budget:
$5,663,805
Category:
None
Population Served:
Adults
Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens
None

Program Description:

The Nutrition Action Healthletter, published by CSPI, is the largest-circulation, most-read health newsletter in North America.  Since 1974, the award-winning Healthletter, published 10 times a year, has been CSPI's major means of providing consumers and journalists with the latest information on food safety, nutrition, and other health issues.  For many readers, Nutrition Action is an indispensable guide to better nutrition and good health. It gives them reliable, science-based advice and product recommendations they can use every day. For others, Nutrition Action is, as implied by its name, a call to action. Over the years, Nutrition Action has initiated numerous petition campaigns and letter-writing efforts to food companies, legislators, and government officials. In addition, CSPI publishes numerous pamphlets, books, and brochures on various health topics, and provides health information on its web site:  www.nutritionaction.com

Program Long-Term Success:

Circulation over the last 10 years has averaged 890,000 per year. We expect those numbers to hit 1 million in April 2014.

Program Short-Term Success:

Many readers have sent praise for Nutrition Action: "Nutrition Action is the best publication on health issues that I have ever subscribed to – and I have subscribed to many. The articles deal with real problems."  Cheryl Galbraith, Knoxville, Tennessee "I am so appreciative to all of you on the staff of Nutrition Action who keep your readers supplied with this vital food and health information." Margaret Esbridge, Boca Raton, Florida "Thank you for all you do! You have helped me understand so much about being healthy."  Karissa Whitehill, Gardner, Kansas "Nutrition Action is by far the most unbiased and informed one I have ever seen. I thought I knew a lot about nutrition, but I have learned something from every issue."  Maleah Spinell, Seattle, Washington

Program Success Monitored by:

Number of subscribers, readers, and awards.

Program Success Examples:

Nutrition Action Healthletter has been honored with awards by the National Wellness Institute, Blue Cross/Blue Shield Association, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, American Medical Writers Association, National Cholesterol Education Program, Vegetarian Times magazine, Real Simple, and other respected organizations and publications. The U.S. and Canadian editions of Nutrition Action have a combined paid circulation of 900,000 and readership of almost two million.

Program: Food Day

Budget:
$489,117
Category:
None
Population Served:
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
Adults
None

Program Description:

The typical American diet is contributing to obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and the ballooning cost of healthcare. Food Day is a nationwide celebration that aims to improve people’s diets and celebrate real food. In 2013, Food Day put special focus on encouraging kids to cook and learn more about food.

Program Long-Term Success:

Food Day draws awareness to food-focused issues and inspires new policies at the local and national level.

Program Short-Term Success:

Program Success Monitored by:

Number of events each year, as well as people involved.

Program Success Examples:

In 2013, more than 5,000 events took place all across the country during the week of October 24.

Program: Health Promotion Policy

Budget:
--
Category:
Cardiovascular Diseases
Population Served:
Adults
Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program Description:

CSPI is working to promote public health policies that reduce the amount of sodium and trans fat in the food supply, as well as reduce the consumption of sugary drinks.

Program Long-Term Success:

Salt is no longer generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the FDA. Also, soda companies create healthier, low-sugar alternatives.

Program Short-Term Success:

The Food and Drug Administration has now acted on a 2004 CSPI petition and has made a preliminary determination that partially hydrogenated oils are no longer generally recognized as safe.

Program Success Monitored by:

Improved government policies and products in the grocery store.

Program Success Examples:

In 2003, CSPI won a major victory which required trans fat labeling on Nutrition Facts labels. To that point, the partially hydrogenated oils were causing roughly 25,000 to 50,000 fatal heart attacks annually. That labeling requirement spurred many food manufacturers to reformulate their products with more healthful oils. In 2012, CSPI released an animated short film, “The Real Bears,” which shows the ugly truth about the harmful effects soda can have on your health. The video has been viewed more than 2 million times on YouTube.


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Impact Summary from the Nonprofit

Since 1971, CSPI has served as an independent and effective food industry watchdog and public health advocate. CSPI lead the efforts to win passage of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, which doubled the amount of fruits and vegetables served in schools, as well as the Food Safety Modernization Act, in 2011, which catalyzed sweeping changes to food safety laws. CSPI also boasts the passage of laws that require the Nutrition Facts label on packaged foods, nutrition information on chain restaurant menus, and define the term “organic” on its long list of accomplishments. Each year, nearly 1 million subscribers to CSPI's Nutrition Action Healthletter receive current, science-based advice to improve diet and health. CSPI's goals for the next few years:  Persuade the Food and Drug Administration to require reduction of sodium in packaged and processed foods; reduce junk food marketing to kids; eliminate artificial dyes from the food supply; change the public's perception of soda and other sugary drinks; and, curb false and misleading food advertising and labeling.

Expert Assessment

The Center for Science in the Public Interest is lauded for compelling industry practices to become better aligned with health concerns through lobbying and legislation. Experts cite marketing efforts to children, food labeling, menu labeling, and school nutrition standards as examples of impact. Read More »

Expert Reviews and Comments

2010 Philanthropedia Top Nonprofit

This organization is a 2010 Philanthropedia top nonprofit, recommended by experts as having high impact.

These expert reviews were generated through Philanthropedia's research methodology to identify high-impact nonprofits. Learn more


Evidence of Impact

The Center for Science in the Public Interest is lauded for compelling industry practices to become better aligned with health concerns through lobbying and legislation. Experts cite marketing efforts to children, food labeling, menu labeling, and school nutrition standards as examples of impact.

Impact
They have had an impact related to work on eliminating competitive foods in schools through specific reforms in legislation reauthorizing child nutrition programs. Foundation Professional
This organization is an aggressive advocate for national policy change on issues such as marketing innutritious food to children. Foundation Professional
They produce a great deal of useful products: their newsletter, their website, quizzes, and informational sheets. Also, they do advocacy in the form of legislation on food labeling, marketing to kids, and school foods. Researcher and Faculty
This group has been successful at pressuring the food industry to drop deceptive marketing campaigns, etc. They often file law suits against large food companies, in the interest of child health. This group is also very successful at helping the public lobby their congressmen/women, asking them to support child nutrition legislation, using email letter writing campaigns. Researcher and Faculty
More than any other foundation I can think of, they have produced measurable change in the world around us. Movie theater popcorn is not popped in trans-fat thanks to them. School policies have been influenced as have restaurant practices. Researcher and Faculty
They work to affect national policy related to child nutrition. Researcher and Faculty
They have had an impact on public policy: reaching out and informing the press, health professionals, and the public on legislative issues. Researcher and Faculty
This advocacy organization has been a driving force promoting nutrition policies for many years. Margo Wootan is a tireless advocate and has been involved in helping get strong nutrition policies passed at the national level, as well as keeping an eye on what is happening in states. Researcher and Faculty
They are a respected national advocacy voice that has a reputation for not compromising values to push policy changes. They are willing to take on much stronger and better-funded interests--examples include threatened lawsuits against children's cereal makers. Researcher and Faculty
They have had heavy involvement with policy makers in Washington. They are effective at getting access and have a strong presence in the press. Researcher and Faculty
They have offered leadership on improving school food, menu-labeling, trans-fat, and other issues that raise awareness about nutrition and have made meaningful changes to the food system. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Their leadership role in the passage of menu labeling laws at the local, state, and national level signify impact. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They are brilliant at handling the media and they are very influential on Capitol Hill because they convened a large group of nonprofits (including AHA, ADA, etc.) that are interested in nutrition, physical activity and obesity. Thus, they have a "louder voice" with their coalition. They were influential in increasing funding for DNPAO at the CDC and they deserve a lot of credit for that. Nonprofit Senior Staff
It has successfully worked to pass national legislation related to healthy eating such as packaged food labeling, menu labeling, and school nutrition standards. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They create campaigns to address processed food issues and, as a result, have changed labeling (trans-fats for example) and knowledge among the public of how bad some processed foods are. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They have a strong public media presence, regular communications, clear communication, and sound information. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They are nonjudgmental and look at facts and evidence. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They have led the way in challenging industry to meet stronger standards in food and nutrition. They have done work on issues including federal legislation (such as the child nutrition act), marketing food to children, and the agriculture bill. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They are expert at getting policies passed at the state, local, and federal level. They provide incredible resources for state and local groups trying to get policies passed. I've found them to be the most helpful group in the nation for improving child and adult nutrition. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They have a strong voice, progressive, and primarily related legislation at the federal level. Nonprofit Senior Staff
It is definitely leading the way in public policy that supports childhood nutrition. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They are extremely savvy on federal policy issues and organize an effective coalition to work on nutrition issues. They have had an undeniable impact on federal legislation in this area. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They provide major national leadership on critical policies such as regulating marketing to children, establishing school nutrition standards, and promoting other policies such as menu labeling improve child nutrition and health. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Their messaging and policy positions are repeated, supported, and disseminated throughout the nutrition and public health communities by groups and networks such as NYSHEPA (NYS Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Alliance), NYC Alliance for Child Nutrition Reauthorization, various state dietetic associations, etc. Nonprofit Senior Staff
An offshoot of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, they send out incredibly helpful updates, resources, and other information on a regular basis. They lead national workgroups and put together memos of support. They have been very helpful to our coalition in terms of keeping us updated, informed, and involved on a national level. Nonprofit Senior Staff
This is a large advocacy network (NANA Coalition) has been influential in impacting federal legislation. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They developed state and local policies to limit the marketing of unhealthy food to children. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They move policy inside the "beltway" and stay in touch with key power-brokers to frame legislation. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They contributed to federal policy and evidence-based dietary recommendations. Other
They have been instrumental in bringing together organizations across the nation working to improve nutrition in our nation's schools through legislation and policy. Through this network and their strong understanding of the legislative process, they have been able to impact federal legislation such as the Child Nutrition Reauthorization and mobilize stakeholders to voice their support and opinions with legislators. Other
I recommend Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), specifically the sub-group National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity (NANA) which advocates national policies and programs to promote healthy eating and physical activity. NANA promotes within the legislative and executive branches of government a better understanding of the importance of healthy eating, physical activity, and obesity control to the nation's health and health-care costs. Other

Organizational Strengths

The vast majority of respondents cite leadership as a major asset for the center. Nearly as often, experts praise the organization's advocacy work. Others mention different operating efficiencies like marketing and communications.

Operations
They combine research, advocacy, and coalition building to advance their healthy food/nutrition agenda. They provide leadership to the field. Foundation Professional
They have a very knowledgeable staff, fantastic outreach through their newsletter, and are great collaborators. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Clarity and accessibility in messaging are strong. Their website, action alerts, direct emails from leadership, Nutrition Action newsletter are all clear, concise, and offer easy to understand explanations about why there is concern for a particular practice or policy, and what the supporting action should be. Their professionalism is a strength of CSPI and avoidance of radicalism is another. They are also willing to acknowledge the landscape of child nutrition with respect to corporate control of food production and marketing while still developing effective strategies to make positive change. Nonprofit Senior Staff
The staff have many years of experience on very complicated issues, and therefore bring a strong track record of understanding and engagement. In addition, they utilize a multi-pronged approach to get a job done: research, media advocacy, legislative negotiations, coalition politics, and litigation. This broad toolbox of approaches makes them flexible and effective. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Program Design
The organization's work is for the most part well-researched and informed. It keeps up to date on potential policy levers to improve the nutritional environment for children. Foundation Professional
They have a reputation for integrity. They are innovative and willing to take chances. Researcher and Faculty
Website
Their website and publications are strengths. Researcher and Faculty
Leadership
This group's leadership is very well known and respected in the field, and they often appear in the media, which suggests a big impact. Researcher and Faculty
The outstanding leadership in Michael Jacobson and Margo Wootan; they have a willingness to stake out bold positions that shake up the status quo. Researcher and Faculty
I would say the biggest strength of this organization is the leadership: Mike Jacobson and Margo Wootan. Researcher and Faculty
Their leadership is good and they are good at leveraging resources to affect policy. Researcher and Faculty
Their leadership, Dr. Michael Jacobsen, is hard-working and committed. He has hired excellent people (like Dr. Margo Wootan) who is equally hard-working and committed. They are articulate and handle the media extremely well. Nonprofit Senior Staff
The National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity has shown strong leadership in the childhood obesity area; strong staffing has enabled this. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Their leadership and marketing are strong. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Margo Wootan is a strength. She knows her stuff, works the Hill, and has excellent media skills. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Margo Wootan is a strong leader. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They have strong leadership, knowledge of the federal legislative process, knowledge of child nutrition, and current recommendations such as those from the Institute of Medicine. Other
Publications
They provide a strong newsletter and work assertively to get people across the country engaged. Researcher and Faculty
The information they produce is great: quizzes, action, information. Researcher and Faculty
I am aware of their research, studies, legislative updates, and some work they've done to promote policy change at the national level. This is good and we need more of this. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Communications
Their public relations and press placement are strengths. Their use of electronic communications to contact legislators is also strong. Researcher and Faculty
It has a very effective communications arm - with the ability to disseminate information to a broad range of organizations across the country and mobilize their action. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They are the most media-savvy organization of the entire list of top childhood nutrition nonprofits. They are dedicated and hard-working. I don't always agree with them, but I respect them. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Their messaging, credibility from leadership qualifications/credentials, and diversity of support base are all strengths of this organization. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Awareness
They play a useful gadfly role. They get more attention than other groups (though I'm not sure that is warranted). Researcher and Faculty
They are continually becoming more well known and well-respected. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Advocacy
This organization has tremendous expertise in framing public health issues and creating effective coalitions to advocate for policy change. They have strong leadership and a wealth of expertise. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Their advocacy, grassroots mobilization, and communications via newsletter/website are strengths. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They are savvy and politic about legislation but are willing to take on industry through other means like lawsuits. I think they strike a good balance of working through the system and shaking up the system. We would not have menu labeling legislation without their input. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They have an incredible command of the media and are effective advocates. They are leaders nationally of campaigns like the trans fat ban and menu-labeling, while also supporting smaller local efforts. They have brilliant leadership. Nonprofit Senior Staff
As a national watchdog and advocacy organization, they keep current with child nutrition issues state-to-state and their organization is appropriately positioned in Washington D.C. to influence and inform federal policy. Other
They are policy leaders, good at convening diverse interests, and good at pushing the policy agenda. Other
Staff & Funding
Its creative staff and broad funding base are strengths. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Marketing
They are well known and are good at getting the word out. They are good at marketing and reaching the media to make their message known. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They have very good marketing. Other
Research
Their research informs work of local partners. They also keep us to date on federal activity. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Resources
The organization has a broad membership base which provides critical support for advocacy efforts and an independent source of income. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Funding
They have strong financial support as well as very passionate and qualified staff leadership. They have over 150 member organizations. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Impact
They are highly effective at leveraging media to support their work. Nonprofit Senior Staff
This is a great group that creates real and meaningful change. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Awareness & Neutrality
They are very visible, objective, unbiased, and have no industry funding. Other

Areas for Improvement

While experts were generally supportive of the organization's advocacy efforts, many considered there to be an opportunity to tone down or adjust some of their messaging.

Target Audience
They could incorporate a more deliberate focus on low income communities and communities of color to demonstrate awareness of how nutrition issues, especially access to healthy food, impact these communities. Foundation Professional
Collaboration
The organization is sometimes seen as overly aggressive. However it is seen as a credible voice. Foundation Professional
Could they partner with the AAP and other MD organizations? Researcher and Faculty
They could have better connections with scientists. Researcher and Faculty
In its passion to succeed, sometimes this organization does not heed the advice and guidance of its local partners. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They could try not to alienate people. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They could provide more opportunities for professional collaboration. Other
Messaging
They could be a bit less bold. They go to extremes to make their point, and alienate a lot of people as a result. They are the quintessential 'food policy' and 'nutrition nannies' in the eyes of their detractors. Researcher and Faculty
They sometimes demonize particular foods. It is true that some of the foods they demonize deserve it -- but the nutrition establishment rejects the demonization of particular foods -- claiming there are no good or bad foods -- only good or bad diets (the word "diet" here refers to one's customary daily intake of food and does NOT refer to weight loss diets). Nonprofit Senior Staff
Neutrality
They can sometimes sensationalize issues and present information/research findings by telling one side of the story. Researcher and Faculty
They appear to be getting to be too 'inside the beltway' with their increasing stature, leading to greater influence but at the price of compromise. However, they are still generally very principled but need to maintain that even if it lessens their access. Researcher and Faculty
Their marketing is biased. Other
Advocacy
This organization has an advocacy orientation that could be perceived by some as hostile to the industry. Researcher and Faculty
Sometimes their processes are very quick and don't give local organizations enough time to conduct internal processes that would allow them to respond effectively. It could also engage more with local organizations as they develop legislative and policy strategies so that these line up with local priorities and actions. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Outreach
They just need help getting out the message. Researcher and Faculty
CSPI and NANA’s strength is its reach and its partners; however, it might be useful to offer direct links to local organizations (e.g. via see grants, CBPR opportunities). If this organization has done so, it is unclear – and might be outside the scope of their mission. Other
Expand Programming
They should expand funding to assist state/local nonprofits and have a focus on physical activity. Nonprofit Senior Staff
I think they have begun to do this already but move more beyond the processed foods to promote whole foods. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They are very focused on nutrition, but need to do more it the physical activity realm. Nonprofit Senior Staff
I don't know if they provide technical assistance to state and local organizations seeking to make policy change at the state and local levels. If they don't, I see this as a need (at least for my organization). Nonprofit Senior Staff
Awareness
They are not well known enough. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Capacity
I think they are spread thin and could use more staffing. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Program Integration
The staff tends to work in silos. This seems to be the management style; more strongly integrating efforts could enhance their impact and ensure consistency. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Program Design
They could show a greater deference to the history of child nutrition advocacy. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Transparency
I don't always believe they tell the full truth about their insider negotiations to their constituents; they seem to use the power of the coalitions to negotiate insider-deals on occasion that all the members may not have had an opportunity to influence. They settle for federal preemption of state and local action (e.g., menu labeling) without thinking about how that damages community organizing and movement building. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They could improve by providing greater transparency about how public positions are determined. Nonprofit Senior Staff

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