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Girl Scouts of Northeast Kansas and Northwest Missouri Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 12/17/2014: Girl Scouts of Northeast Kansas and Northwest Missouri

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 12/08/2014: GIRL SCOUTS OF NORTHEAST KANSAS AND NORTHWEST MISSOURI INC

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

 
Kansas City, MO

GuideStar Summary

&1002; GuideStar Exchange Organization has not reached a GuideStar Exchange Participation Level ?
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&1002; Registered with IRS Legitimacy information is available
&1002; Financial Data Annual Revenue and Expense data reported
&1002; Forms 990 2013, 2012, and 2011 Forms 990 filed with the IRS
&1002; Mission Objectives Mission Statement is available
&1002; Impact Summary Impact Summary from the nonprofit is available
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Basic Organization Information

Girl Scouts of Northeast Kansas and Northwest Missouri Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 12/17/2014: Girl Scouts of Northeast Kansas and Northwest Missouri

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 12/08/2014: GIRL SCOUTS OF NORTHEAST KANSAS AND NORTHWEST MISSOURI INC

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
Physical Address: Kansas City, MO 64133 
EIN: 43-0892926
Web URL: www.gsksmo.org 
NTEE Category: O Youth Development
O42 Girl Scouts
Ruling Year: 1968 


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Mission Statement

Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.

Legitimacy Information

This organization is registered with the IRS.

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Annual Revenue & Expenses

(GuideStar Exchange,
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December 2014)

Fiscal Year Starting: October 1, 2014
Fiscal Year Ending: September 30, 2015

Total Revenue --
Total Expenses --

Revenue & Expenses

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Balance Sheet (IRS Form 990)

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Forms 990 Provided by the Nonprofit

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Financial Statements

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Annual Reports

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Leadership

(GuideStar Exchange,
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December 2014)

Ms. Joy Wheeler

Profile:

Joy Wheeler is an incredible professional with vast experience in for profit and non-profit leadership. Prior to joining Girl Scouts, first as interim CEO in April 2013 then becoming permanent CEO in September, Ms. Wheeler was Interim CEO at Marillac Center. She has an extensive healthcare leadership background and serves on many boards making her well connected in our council's jurisdiction.

Leadership Statement:

One girl makes a difference; girls together are changing the world. It is with this in mind that Girl Scouts provides a place for girls to build their leadership skills. Our Girl Scouts provide thousands of hours supporting their communities from organizing collection drives for local food pantries to making sure troops overseas have a taste of home with special care packages. Girl Scouts making a difference today and into the future is the core of our mission.Girl Scout alumnae are the proof of the impact Girl Scouts have on girls. Eighty percent of women business owners were Girl Scouts, sixty-nine percent of female U.S. senators were Girl Scouts and virtually every female astronaut who has flown in space was a Girl Scout. America's most accomplished women in public service, business, science, education, the arts, and community life are Girl Scout alumnae.Through Girl Scouts, girls develop their leadership potential by participating in activities that enable them to discover their values, skills, and the world around them; connect with others in a multicultural environment; and take action to make a difference in the world. Girls can participate individually or in a troop setting through diverse program opportunities including camping (day, troop and resident), challenge (archery, ziplining and rappelling), equestrian, STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), and other skill-building activities.A Girl Scout's journey is made possible with support from committed parents, adult volunteers, and community donors. Thank you for your past support. We hope you will join us as we embark on the next 100 years of Girl Scouting.

Board Chair (GuideStar Exchange,
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December 2014)

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Board Co-Chair

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Board of Directors (GuideStar Exchange,
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December 2014)

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Board Leadership Practices (GuideStar Exchange,
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December 2014)
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GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

Board Orientation & Education ?
Why does this matter? Without clarity around their responsibilities and expectations, board members are not positioned to succeed. They may find themselves challenged to fulfill their governance responsibilities or frustrated by the expectations that the organization has set for them. BoardSource recommends that every new board member participate in a formal orientation process, and that all board members sign a pledge or agreement committing to their board service and to all of the responsibilities and expectations that come with service. Ideally, board members also should participate in a formal governance training program prior to serving on a board.

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?
Response Not Provided
CEO Oversight ?
Why does this matter? Oversight and management of the chief executive is one of the board’s most important legal responsibilities. The CEO or executive director is the board's single employee, and - just like any other employer/employee relationship - regular and written assessment is critical to ensuring that the chief executive and board are communicating openly about goals and performance. BoardSource recommends that boards conduct formal, written reviews of their chief executives on an annual basis, which should include an in-person discussion with the chief executive and distribution of the written evaluation to the full board.

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?
Response Not Provided
Ethics & Transparency ?
Why does this matter? A commitment to handling conflicts of interests is essential to creating an organizational culture of transparency. Boards should create and follow a policy for identifying and handling conflicts of interest, whether real or perceived. BoardSource recommends that organizations review the conflict-of-interest statement and require signed disclosures from all board members and senior staff on an annual basis.

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements within the past year?
Response Not Provided
Board Composition ?
Why does this matter? The best boards are composed of individuals who bring a variety of skills, perspectives, backgrounds, and resources to tackle the complex and strategic challenges confronting their organizations. BoardSource recommends that boards commit to diversity and inclusion by establishing written policies and practices, which include strategic and intentional recruitment of diverse board members, continual commitment to inclusivity, and equal access to board leadership opportunities.

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?
Response Not Provided
Board Performance ?
Why does this matter? Boards need to regularly assess their own performance. Doing so ensures that they are being intentional about how they govern their organization, which is a critical component of effective board leadership. BoardSource recommends that a board conduct a self-assessment of its performance a minimum of once every three years to ensure that it is staying on track with its roles and responsibilities.

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?
Response Not Provided

Officers for Fiscal Year (IRS Form 990)

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Highest Paid Employees & Their Compensation (IRS Form 990)

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People information was last updated by the nonprofit in December 2014

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Programs

Program: Girl Scouting in NE Kansas & NW Missouri (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
December 2014)

Budget:
$8,543,916
Category:
Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served:
Females, all ages or age unspecified
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program Description:

Girl Scouting, delivered by trained volunteer mentors, promotes cooperation and team building; offers girls a safe place to gain practical life skills in financial literacy, science, technology, engineering, math, healthy living and more; and, encourages and empower girls to develop positive values.There are three main ways a girl participates in Girl Scouts: Volunteer-Led Troops meet with the same group of girls throughout the school year; Outreach Programming supports girls in underserved communities to be Girl Scouts; and Outdoor Adventure and Learning at Girl Scout camps. Our leadership development curriculum is designed to help girls become leaders, build confidence, and solve problems in their communities. Activities are girl-led and encourage cooperative learning and learning by doing. Our iconic skill-based badges offer girls the chance to try new things and develop specific skills, from public policy to cooking healthy meals, geocaching to inventing to staying fit.

Program Long-Term Success:

Girls engage in leadership development in everything they do, all aimed at providing girls the benefits of the Girl Scout "Keys to Leadership": DISCOVERING themselves, CONNECTING with others, and TAKING ACTION to make the world a better place. Both the leadership development curriculum and badges are age-appropriate and correlated to national and state learning standards so that educators and parents can be confident that girls are having fun and active experiences that reinforce what they are learning during the school day.Girl Scouts, and the values and skills learned, will help girls in our community succeed in school, the local workforce and lay the foundation to building future community leaders. We seek to help girls become leaders with courage, confidence and character to make the world a better place.

Program Short-Term Success:

The Girl Scout Leadership Experience identifies three keys to leadership. Each of these three keys has five expected outcomes measured by age appropriate indicators to determine if the outcomes are being met. Discover: Girls understand themselves and their values and learn to use their knowledge and skills. Girls develop a strong sense of selfGirls develop positive valuesGirls gain practical life skillsGirls seek challenges in the worldGirls develop critical thinkin Connect: Girls care about and connect with others. Girls develop healthy relationshipsGirls promote cooperation and team buildingGirls can resolve conflictsGirls advance diversity in a multicultural worldGirls feel connected to their communities, locally and globally Take Action: Girls act to make the world a better place. Girls can identify community needsGirls are resourceful problem solversGirls advocate for themselves and others, locally and globallyGirls educate and inspire others to actGirls feel empowered to make a difference in the world

Program Success Monitored by:

The Girl Scout program is framed around three "keys to leadership": discovering themselves, connecting with others, and taking action to make the world a better place. All Girl Scout programs include leadership skill building. Each Journey involves girls developing a ""Take Action"" project wherein girls identify a community need or problem, develop and implement a plan to address the need/problem, and educate and inspire others to act; hence living the Girl Scout mission of making the world a better place. Girl Scouts has three outcomes and five indicators to illustrate progress towards program goals: 1. Girls will promote cooperation and team building. This will be measured by the number and percent of girls who earn Journey Awards. 2. Girls will remain Girl Scouts. Girl retention, measured by the number and percent of girls who stay in Girl Scouts from year to year, is an indicator that girls are forming positive relationships with adults, gaining skills, and participating in projects that keep them engaged in Girl Scouts. 3. Girls will learn life skills. Three indicators will be measured for this outcome. a. The number and percent of girls earning skill-building proficiency badges which require girls to complete five unique steps over several experiences to learn, experience, and teach others the skills they build in the program. b. The number and percent of girl participation in the Cookie Program - Girls learn five key life skills in this program. c. The number and percent of outdoor adventure and learning program participants - Girls learn life and leadership skills when participating in Girl Scouts outdoor programs. Data for each outcome is collected separately and stored in a database; samples are not used.

Program Success Examples:

Inspiring other Girl Scouts to take the lead, by Allison Jones I grew up in Girl Scouts beginning my journey at the age of five. I was shy and hesitant to try new things. My troop leader opened the door to adventure and encouraged me to take on the challenges I thought I could not overcome. Her guidance helped shape me into the woman I am today. My name is Allison Jones, and I am a proud Girl Scout alumna working in a career I was destined to follow after my love of science was piqued by my troop leader. She built the fun of science into the Girl Scout experience with engaging experiments and adventure in the outdoors. The more I became involved in the activities, the more I wanted to learn. In addition to my great troop experiences, I had an opportunity to spend several years working as a Girl Scout camp counselor. It was such an empowering experience to show younger girls the wonder of the outdoors. Both of these experiences led me to my first goal of studying biology with the hope of one day working with animals. Upon graduation in 2012, I returned home and found a perfect fit as an Education Instructor for the Kansas City Zoo. Of course working directly with animals is amazing, but my favorite part is interacting with children, especially the girls. I help open their eyes to the wonder of science and show them what is possible to pursue. After all, it was Girl Scouts that gave me the confidence to know that being myself was enough. I encourage other young girls to pursue Girl Scouting. Just like me, they will see all that is possible and reach for their dreams. For more impact stories, please visit http://daisyscircle.org/impact-stories

Program: Girl Scout Outreach Program for Troops Kansas City's Underserved Communities (GuideStar Exchange,
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December 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served:
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Program Description:

Our Outreach Program makes it possible for 1,200 girls in underserved communities in Kansas City to realize the Girl Scout mission: to become girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. Girls participate in the same program as volunteer-led troops; however their troops are led by paid part-time staff, eliminating the possibility that these girls are not served due to volunteer shortage. Community support of this program is very important and enables us to help girls develop their full potential, build important life skills, and contribute to the improvement of our community. The cost to participate in the program and receive her book, sash and membership dues is fully underwritten for each girl. We strive to ensure that girls in the Girl Scout Outreach Program have the same high-quality programming and experiences as all Girl Scouts, including leadership skill building, exposure to STEM, Financial Literacy, and outdoor adventure activities.

Program Long-Term Success:

Girls engage in leadership development in everything they do, all aimed at providing girls the benefits of the Girl Scout "Keys to Leadership": DISCOVERING themselves, CONNECTING with others, and TAKING ACTION to make the world a better place. Both the leadership development curriculum and badges are age-appropriate and correlated to national and state learning standards so that educators and parents can be confident that girls are having fun and active experiences that reinforce what they are learning during the school day. Girl Scouts, and the values and skills learned, will help girls in our community succeed in school, the local workforce and lay the foundation to building future community leaders. We seek to help girls become leaders with courage, confidence and character to make the world a better place.

Program Short-Term Success:

The Girl Scout Outreach program modules offer activities that are girl-led, encourage cooperative learning, and are experiential in nature (learning by doing). Twelve hundred (1200) Girls in the Girl Scout Outreach Program will learn to make decisions, express themselves, practice conflict resolution skills and learn about the differences that define individuals and cultures and ultimately lead to increased self-respect and respect for others. 2014-2015 Outreach Program outcomes: * Girls gain practical life skills * Girls develop healthy relationships * Girls seek challenges in the world * Girls educate and inspire others to act* Girl improve their attitude towards science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)

Program Success Monitored by:

Progress towards these outcomes will be demonstrated through pre- and post-surveys administered to the girls by their program leaders. Results are collected in a database so we can target instruction in following years. The program manager also observes activities much like a school principal will do a classroom walk-through, watching for engagement and participation.

Program Success Examples:

Over 100,000 girls have benefited from the Outreach Program in its 20+ year history.

Program: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Programs (GuideStar Exchange,
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December 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served:
Females, all ages or age unspecified

Program Description:

The Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) program helps girls discover their potential, develop critical thinking skills, see STEM areas as accessible options for career pathways, and discover their potential through hands-on, inquiry-based learning on a wide variety of STEM topics such as aerospace, digital photography, forensic science, and exploring wetlands. The program integrates the leadership development outcomes of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience, engaging girls in three key areas of leadership - girls discover themselves; connect with others; and take action to make the world a better place. In addition, all learning in STEM programs uses the Girl Scout processes, which ensures that activities are girl-led, learning is cooperative, and that girls learn by doing. The STEM programs offer community partnerships, volunteer-led programs, and core program materials such as the Girl Scout journey, It's Your Planet—Love It!, which is environmentally focused and has activities for all ages, lasting for ten to twelve troop meetings.

Program Long-Term Success:

By 2018, America will need three million more scientists and engineers. Yet only 25 percent of STEM workforce positions are currently held by women. For a complex array of reasons, girls begin to lose interest in STEM subjects usually around third grade; girls often do not think they are good at these subjects in school and do not envision themselves as future scientists, technologists, engineers, or mathematicians. In particular, girls from the urban core struggle to see themselves in STEM careers. Girl Scouts is committed to girls' exploration of STEM subjects and the advancement of girls in STEM career fields. Girl Scouts STEM programs help girls develop critical thinking skills, see STEM areas as accessible options for career pathways, and discover their potential through hands-on, inquiry-based learning on a wide variety of STEM topics such as environmental stewardship, understanding energy, and exploring wetlands.

Program Short-Term Success:

OUTCOME STATEMENT 1: Girl Scouts will gain knowledge about STEM careers from professionals in the community through Spark Events coordinated by the STEM Program Manager. Target: At least 300 girls will participate in a Spark Event and learn about a possible STEM career path that they are interested in pursuing. OUTCOME STATEMENT 2: Girl Scouts will improve their attitude towards STEM after the STEM module of the Girl Scout Outreach Program. Target: 330 (30%) of girls will report improved attitudes toward STEM after participation. OUTCOME STATEMENT 3: Girl Scout troop leaders will improve their confidence in delivering STEM programming to Girl Scouts after participating in the Get Moving Institute. Target: 60% of Get Moving Institute participants will report more confidence towards delivering STEM programs to Girl Scouts.

Program Success Monitored by:

OUTCOME STATEMENT 1: This will be through attendance numbers, checklist observations at the Spark Events, and through post-survey data. OUTCOME STATEMENT 2: This will be shown through the pre- and post-surveys, and collected in a database so we can target instruction in the following years. The walk-through data will be used as a baseline for core instruction in the STEM module this year, and used to help inform decisions made with the data from the girl surveys. The walk-through data will also be used to drive evaluative conversations with staff at the end of the module. OUTCOME STATEMENT 3: Process: This will be through post-surveys, and collected in a database so we can adapt instruction in following years as the Institute model expands past the pilot-year. There will also be informal assessments though observations and trouble-shooting conversations over the 9 months of the Institute that will also inform our decisions moving the Institute into new areas.

Program Success Examples:

Sarah's Story Sarah was a Girl Scout from age seven through her senior year of high school. Sarah always loved science, but as she got older, she noticed that her friends began losing interest. Sarah wanted to change this-- she wanted to get kids excited about science. For her Gold Award Take Action project, Sarah created fun after-school science projects for elementary students in low income, racially diverse neighborhoods. Some kids had never experienced hands‐on science before—they were enthusiastic and eager for more. ""It was gratifying to make a positive impact on other children's lives through Girl Scouts,"" said Sarah. Sarah earned a full scholarship to the University of Maryland and is now studying mechanical engineering. She hopes to someday develop prosthetics for veterans. ""Girl Scouts gave me the courage to try new things and take on challenges… I wouldn't be where I am today without Girl Scouts,"" says Sarah.

Program: Girl Scout Outdoor Adventure & Learning (GuideStar Exchange,
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December 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served:
Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)

Program Description:

Girl Scout Outdoor Experiences and Camp allows girls the opportunity to discover their natural world, understand the science behind nature and become strong environmental stewards. Five area camp properties of over 1,200 acres total host over 2,000 resident campers, 7,000 day campers, and 22,000 weekend and adventure participants annually. Featured activities include rapelling, ziplining, climbing, horseback riding, archery, canoeing, hiking, swimming, sports, etc.

Program Long-Term Success:

More than ever, Girl Scouts need to provide more opportunities for girls to discover, connect, and take action out-of-doors in a way that builds courage, confidence, and character. Camping and outdoor programs are essential to the leadership experience of Girl Scouts. They create the opportunity for girls to learn critical thinking, experience community, and embrace the natural environment. A trip to camp provides freedom from social pressures, hectic schedules, and threatening home environments. Girls try new things, teach and help sister Girl Scouts, overcome fears, and learn to better enjoy outdoor experiences. They develop a strong sense of self, seek challenges, learn to work as a team, and become environmental stewards. They also make memories that last a lifetime.

Program Short-Term Success:

OUTCOME 1 - Girls seek challenges in the world. They develop positive attitudes toward learning, seeking opportunities for expanding their knowledge and skills, set challenging goals for themselves, and take appropriate risks. OUTCOME 2 - Girls are resourceful problem solvers. They use their knowledge and skills to set up and implement creative and effective ""action plans,"" locate the tools and resources they need, and know when, where, and how to enlist help from others. OUTCOME 3 - Girls promote cooperation and team building. They recognize the value of working together and learn to make decisions that benefit the whole group. They build effective teams, learn to be accountable for shared goals, and show recognition for others' contributions and accomplishments.

Program Success Monitored by:

Post-activity surveys are administered to evaluate this program.

Program Success Examples:

Quote from Madeline B., Senior Girl Scout""Girl Scout camp taught me to be responsible for myself and to appreciate the little things. I loved making new friends and taking a break from all of the stressful things in my life. I owe so much to my camp experiences; I would never trade them for anything.""

Impact Summary from the Nonprofit

After several years of vacancy and interim status in the role of Girl Scout CEO, an experienced CEO is on board to lead the strategic effort for reorganization and membership growth. Joy Wheeler became interim in April 2013 and quickly made several key management decisions including reorganizing the agency structure; identifying four distinct regions to be managed by a regional director and regional team to ensure better service delivery to girls and volunteers; redesigning our Outreach Program resulting in higher quality programming; and re-focusing efforts on recruiting and training adult role models for volunteers. She also led the board and staff in implementing the strategic business plan. In September 2013, Joy Wheeler became the permanent CEO and continues to lead the organization around its four key priorities (below) that support our winning proposition, ""Girl Scouts will engage and support adults who empower girls to invent their dreams."" Pathways: Girls are engaged and retained through outstanding delivery of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience via the troop pathway (grades K-5) and development of series pathways (grades 4-5).Human Resources: Attract, recruit, develop and retain adults who can deliver on our winning proposition.Funding: Diverse revenue streams are identified and developed to meet funding needs, and underwrite innovation and growth.Engagement: Build strong relationship with volunteers, donors and community leaders too advance Girl Scouting.Two additional achievements for 2013-2014 were the reinstatement of face-to-face training for volunteers and the dedication of resources from the Board Fund Development Committee to increase philanthropic giving from 10% to 30% of overall agency revenue over the next five years.

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