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Community Food Bank Inc., dba Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 09/18/2014: Community Food Bank Inc., dba Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 12/08/2014: COMMUNITY FOOD BANK INC

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

AKA  Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona
Tucson, AZ
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GuideStar Summary

&1002; GuideStar Exchange Committed to transparency ?
This organization is a Gold-level GuideStar Exchange participant, demonstrating its commitment to transparency.

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&1002; Registered with IRS Legitimacy information is available
&1002; Financial Data Annual Revenue and Expense data reported
&1002; Forms 990 2013, 2012, and 2011 Forms 990 filed with the IRS
&1002; Mission Objectives Mission Statement is available
&1002; Impact Summary Charting Impact Report is available
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Basic Organization Information

Community Food Bank Inc., dba Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 09/18/2014: Community Food Bank Inc., dba Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 12/08/2014: COMMUNITY FOOD BANK INC

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
Also Known As: Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona
Physical Address: Tucson, AZ 85726 
EIN: 51-0192519
Web URL: www.communityfoodbank.org 
NTEE Category: W Public, Society Benefit
W99 Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C.
K Agriculture, Food, Nutrition
K20 Agricultural Programs
Ruling Year: 1976 


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Mission Statement

"Through education, advocacy and the collection, storage and distribution of food, we will anticipate and meet the needs of the hungry in our community."

Legitimacy Information

This organization is registered with the IRS.

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Institutional funders should note that an organization’s inclusion on GuideStar.org does not satisfy IRS Rev. Proc. 2011-33 for identifying supporting organizations.

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Annual Revenue & Expenses (IRS Form 990, July 2012)

Fiscal Year Starting: July 01, 2012
Fiscal Year Ending: June 30, 2013

Total Revenue $54,480,182
Total Expenses $53,701,760

Revenue & Expenses

Revenue and expense information has not been provided by the nonprofit. Click here if you are associated with this organization and want to provide this information.

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Balance Sheet (IRS Form 990)

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Forms 990 Received from the IRS Additional Information
IRS Form 990 is an annual document used by approximately one-third of all public charities to report information about their finances and operations to the federal government. GuideStar uses data from Form 990 to populate its database with financial information about nonprofit organizations. Posting Form 990 images on the GuideStar website is an ongoing process.

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Forms 990 Provided by the Nonprofit

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Financial Statements

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Annual Reports

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Leadership

(GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

Mr. Michael McDonald

Board Chair (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

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Board Co-Chair (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

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Board of Directors (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

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Board Leadership Practices (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)
?

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

Board Orientation & Education ?
Why does this matter? Without clarity around their responsibilities and expectations, board members are not positioned to succeed. They may find themselves challenged to fulfill their governance responsibilities or frustrated by the expectations that the organization has set for them. BoardSource recommends that every new board member participate in a formal orientation process, and that all board members sign a pledge or agreement committing to their board service and to all of the responsibilities and expectations that come with service. Ideally, board members also should participate in a formal governance training program prior to serving on a board.

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?
Yes
CEO Oversight ?
Why does this matter? Oversight and management of the chief executive is one of the board’s most important legal responsibilities. The CEO or executive director is the board's single employee, and - just like any other employer/employee relationship - regular and written assessment is critical to ensuring that the chief executive and board are communicating openly about goals and performance. BoardSource recommends that boards conduct formal, written reviews of their chief executives on an annual basis, which should include an in-person discussion with the chief executive and distribution of the written evaluation to the full board.

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?
Yes
Ethics & Transparency ?
Why does this matter? A commitment to handling conflicts of interests is essential to creating an organizational culture of transparency. Boards should create and follow a policy for identifying and handling conflicts of interest, whether real or perceived. BoardSource recommends that organizations review the conflict-of-interest statement and require signed disclosures from all board members and senior staff on an annual basis.

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements within the past year?
Yes
Board Composition ?
Why does this matter? The best boards are composed of individuals who bring a variety of skills, perspectives, backgrounds, and resources to tackle the complex and strategic challenges confronting their organizations. BoardSource recommends that boards commit to diversity and inclusion by establishing written policies and practices, which include strategic and intentional recruitment of diverse board members, continual commitment to inclusivity, and equal access to board leadership opportunities.

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?
Yes
Board Performance ?
Why does this matter? Boards need to regularly assess their own performance. Doing so ensures that they are being intentional about how they govern their organization, which is a critical component of effective board leadership. BoardSource recommends that a board conduct a self-assessment of its performance a minimum of once every three years to ensure that it is staying on track with its roles and responsibilities.

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?
Yes

Officers for Fiscal Year (IRS Form 990)

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Highest Paid Employees & Their Compensation (IRS Form 990)

Highest Paid Employee data is not available for this organization.

People information was last updated by the nonprofit in September 2014

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Programs

Program: Agency Market (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

Budget:
$8,592,836
Category:
None
Population Served:
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General
None
None

Program Description:

Provides donated food items to non-profit agencies (501 C-3) that serve on site food assistance, or creates a take home package of food for needy individuals and families. The majority of the food for this program comes from local sources such as grocery stores, and buying clubs. We also get food from food drives, food manufacturing and shared excess food from food banks across the nation.

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Program: The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP/Food Box) (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
September 2014)

Budget:
$11,061,442
Category:
None
Population Served:
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General
None
None

Program Description:

Provides a once a month food box to low income individuals and households. The box is comprised of surplus USDA commodities, donated food items from food drives, and local resources. We also purchase certain items that we do not get enough donated, such as peanut butter. We also supplement these boxes with fresh bread and produce as available. These boxes are meant to provide 2 to 3 days of assistance while they are seeking additional assistance. We are contracted with DES to serve Pima, Graham, Greenlee, Cochise, and Santa Cruz Counties. We provide pre-made Food Boxes to 38 partner sites in Pima County who manage the distribution to clients, and we deliver and handle same day distribution of Food Boxes to 28 cities throughout Graham, Greenlee, Cochise, and Santa Cruz Counties. Our 4 Branch Banks all provide TEFAP Food Boxes plus they all offer a second additional Food Box containing non-USDA items such as excess bread, produce, or store donations.

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Program: Food Plus Program (Commodity Supplimental Food Program / CSFP) (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
September 2014)

Budget:
$5,900,134
Category:
None
Population Served:
Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens
Infants/Babies (under age 5)
None

Program Description:

Food Plus is a partnership between the USDA and PCHD to provide a nutritionally balanced USDA commodities food package once a month to income eligible seniors. Our case load each month is approximately 5,000 seniors. They are eligible to pick up their box at our Country Club Facility, numerous housing complexes in Tucson, or any of our branch bank locations. Through this program we serve individuals of Pima, Cochise and Santa Cruz counties.

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Program: Garden Program (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General
None
None

Program Description:

The garden program is composed of three elements: home gardening program, Nuestra Tierra demonstration garden, and the home garden cooperative. As a community resource, anyone is eligible to sign-up for free, or by donation, to be a member of the home gardening program. Membership gives you access to vegetable seeds, seedlings, compost, garden materials, garden advice and a monthly e-newsletter. Members are encouraged to volunteer, help with installing other home gardens, attend workshops, and educate their local community. There are over 900 current Home Gardening Program members. The Nuestra Tierra Demonstration Garden is open to the public during business hours, and offers a ¼ acre friendly space to showcase best practices for desert food production, such as sunken veggie beds, drip irrigation, rainwater harvesting, and composting. Approximately 150 people visit the garden each week, and the garden logs 7,000 volunteer hours each year. Workshops on various topics related to home food production are held at the Community Food Bank Nuestra Tierra Garden (as well as Las Milpitas farm) during the fall and spring seasons, and are free to the public (donations suggested). Additional gardening classes at community sites are also held throughout the year, and may be requested by an organization or school group. Vegetables harvested from Nuestra Tierra are sold at Community Food Bank farmers’ markets and sales go back into the program. Income-qualifying individuals are eligible to be a home garden cooperative member. Members attend three basic gardening classes, complete three gardening workshops and support another home garden installation to become eligible for a “digging party” (garden installation) at their own home, plus one year of continued support. Eligibility follows the same income levels as WIC qualification. There are over 200 home vegetable gardens in Pima County that have been built through this program. Graduates of the Cooperative can become Garden Mentors. Mentors are paired with new cooperative members in their geographic area and provide advice and support through the new member’s first year of gardening.

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Program: Farmers' Market Program (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
General Public/Unspecified
None
None

Program Description:

The Farmers’ Market program provides a way for food-insecure communities to access fresh, locally-grown nutritious produce. By offering space and consignment sales to local vendors, the markets also provide support for local farmers and gardeners, strengthening our regional food system. We sell a variety of naturally-grown, seasonal fruits and vegetables, eggs, meat, herbs, coffee, honey, and baked goods. Our Farmers’ Markets are the only ones in Southern Arizona which accept WIC, SNAP, and AZFMNP, as well as cash and credit. Our 3 weekly markets are: • El Pueblo Farm Stand: Monday 3-5pm at the El Pueblo Clinic parking lot, Irvington Rd. and S 6th Ave. • Community Food Bank Market: Tues 8-12pm at CFB. • Santa Cruz River Market: Thursday 3-6pm (Oct-Apr), and 4-7pm (May-Sept) at El Mercado San Augustin, 100 S Avenida del Convento Gardeners and small farmers have an opportunity to sell any amount of unprocessed, naturally-grown produce and eggs at the farmers’ market on consignment. The Farmers’ Market sells their produce and returns 90% of profits to the grower. Any unsold items are considered a donation by the grower and are distributed to our clients as bonus items within the pantry.

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Program: Caridad Community Kitchen (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
None
None
None

Program Description:

CCK provides approximately 14,000 nutritious meals per month to those in need in Tucson. These nutritious meals are distributed to 11 meal sites in our community that have agreed to be public walk-in meal sites for the poor, low-income and homeless. The 14,000 meals are prepared by our Culinary Training Program Students under the guidance of our Executive Chef and Sous Chef. Our Culinary Training Program is an integral part of CCK. We enroll 8-10 students into our 10 week free training program, where they work full time 40 hours a week and learn knife skills, culinary math, menu planning, how to create the 5 Mother Sauces, and various cooking techniques. The students also receive instruction on Life Skills which encompasses: how to prepare a resume, job search, interview, budgeting, and more. Potentials students go through a rigorous interview process and must fit our criteria of being low-income, from an at risk population, looking to improve themselves as they may have been incarcerated, in a drug rehab program or unemployed. CCK partners with many local restaurants, resorts, hospitals, casinos, schools and corporations to help in the placement of our students.

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Program: Farm to Child Program (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
None
None
None

Program Description:

The goal of this program is to help children and youth access fresh, locally grown food through their school gardens and cafeterias. Program staff accomplishes this by working to reduce policy barriers and also build capacity with teachers, parents, and cafeteria staff. In 2013, we received a Farm-to-School grant from the USDA to partner with Tucson Unified, where we are helping a dozen schools maximize their garden production to serve the food in the cafeteria. We provide seasonal school garden trainings, seeds, and seedlings, among other things, to approximately 50 schools. While school gardening is the focus of the program, we also aim to support cafeterias in their efforts to acquire produce from local farmers on a larger scale.

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Program: Las Milpitas de Cottonwood Farm (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
None
None
None

Program Description:

The Community Food Bank partnered with City High School and Pima County in 2011 to create Las Milpitas de Cottonwood; an education-based, community-managed farm located on the west bank of the Santa Cruz River, on Cottonwood Ln, south of Silverlake Rd. The surrounding neighborhood residents play a key role in the visioning, planning, construction, and operation at the Farm. Involvement in this space is open to anyone. The farm offers irrigated sunken-bed garden plots for neighbors to grow food. Each group who wishes to adopt a plot agrees to attend a monthly meeting and pay water costs (currently $6/month). Anyone is welcome to apply, but preference is given based on proximity to the farm and lack of access to home garden space. Las Milpitas also offers community facilities like a shade structures and an outdoor classroom for hosting classes and events (ours or other schools/groups' classes). These ramadas are always available and do not require reservation. A committee comprised of those interested in the day-to-day operations and future direction of the farm meets regularly to discuss issues, plan events, and provide farm support. This committee is bilingual (English/Spanish) and open to anyone.

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Program: Youth Farm Program (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
None
None
None

Program Description:

During the school year, youth 14-18 are hired as Farm Apprentices for year-long sessions to grow food in their community while addressing issues of food security and nutrition. Youth participants will visit various schools, farms, and garden sites—all within Tucson—who help build our local economy, support their communities, and teach our children and youth. Graduates of the Youth Apprentice Program age 16-24 can apply as interns to gain more responsibility in the program and learn more about sustainable agriculture, educate the community, and become advocates for their local food system. The program partners with 10 school demonstration sites who practice and promote food production and community education at their school. UA student volunteers support the school demonstration sites through a partnership with the UA School of Geography.

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Program: Gabrielle Giffords Family Assistance Center (GGFAC) (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
September 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
None
None
None

Program Description:

GGFAC supports community members through SNAP application assistance and family advocacy, SNAP Outreach and training, and family literacy education opportunities. GGFAC has three work stations dedicated to one-on-one assistance on applications for SNAP, AHCCCS, and Cash Assistance as well as one work station dedicated to family advocacy. This provides a way to connect those in need with immediate food assistance, as well as educate the community about assistance programs and connect individuals in need with other programs and services available within the Food Bank and other partner organizations. SNAP application staff performs outreach visits to pantries, schools, public libraries and events to educate the community about Community Food Bank food assistance resources in addition to processing SNAP applications at designated sites. The GGFAC staff also aims to train partner organization staff and volunteers to establish permanent SNAP assistance locations, eventually operating without CFB staff. GGFAC also offers a SNAP Promotora training where committed individuals assist others with SNAP/AHCCCS applications and are educated on food systems and community organizing. Upon completion of the training, promotoras will be equipped to assist those in their community with applications, either from the GGFAC office or another site. The GGFAC also teaches an Economic/Family Literacy curriculum to parents who wish to provide better opportunities for their children. Classes are available for groups upon request. Class topics include information about assistance programs and services that are available, nutrition and diet, cultural/family exercises, and community building activities.

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Program: Backpack Program (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
None
None
None

Program Description:

The BackPack Program utilizes a unique relationship with community partners and participating schools to provide children who have been identified as needing additional food assistance over the weekend with a pack of nutritious, child-friendly food. Staff members at participating schools identify the children with the greatest need at their respective schools and every Friday these children go home with a pack full of healthy food to see them through the weekend. Each school has a community partner (a faith-based organization, civic group, another school, etc.) who, every week, picks up food in bulk from the Community Food Bank, puts the BackPacks together for each student of their partner school and then delivers those packs to the school. Through handouts provided with the BackPacks, we are able to provide education to the children and their families about health and nutrition information, programs and services of the Community Food Bank, and federal, state and local programs for which the family may qualify. Currently we provide weekend meals to 1,615 children for 38 weeks during the school year operating in 18 schools in Pima County and 2 schools in Santa Cruz County and have 14 Community Partners. School qualifications include: 75% of the students attending the school must be eligible for the Free and Reduced Breakfast and Lunch Program; school must have a secure, temperature controlled area to store BackPacks until distributed; School must provide a BackPack coordinator who will be responsible for the program at the school, attend meetings, and submit monthly reports.

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Program: After School Meals & Snacks Program (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
September 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
None
None
None

Program Description:

The After School Snack program partners with five Tucson Parks and Recreation sites through their KidCo and Inbetweeners Club programs—after-school recreation programs for children ages 5-14. Throughout the school year we provide healthy, after-school snacks five days a week to each site through the USDA at Risk after School Child and Adult Care Food Program, administered state-wide by the Arizona Department of Education. The program’s snack menu uses a four-week, rotational menu that meets ADE and USDA guidelines. Currently, there are 185 kids participating in the After School Snack Program at five Tucson Parks and Recreation sites. The program runs 38 weeks during the school year as well as throughout most school breaks through the Parks and Rec “Schoolzout” program. In addition, we have partnered with five Boys and Girls Clubs and one Tucson Parks and Recreation Center (Roy Drachman Boys and Girls Club, Steve Daru Boys and Girls Club, Frank and Edith Morton Boys and Girls Club, Jim and Vicki Click Boys and Girls Club, Holmes Tuttle Boys and Girls Club, and Freedom Recreation Center) to provide full healthy meals to children who participate in their programs. Fresh meals are delivered to these sites every day around supper time and are served to the children free of charge by volunteers and program staff. This meal program was made possible through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), which provides federal funding to help supply meals to children in need. Currently approximately 350 suppers per day are served each week day during the school year.

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Program: Summer Meals Program (GuideStar Exchange,
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September 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
None
None
None

Program Description:

The Summer Meals program is funded through The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) within the US Department of Agriculture. This program provides funding to non-profit organizations across the United States so that they can serve meals to children in need during the summer months when school is out.

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