Educational Institutions

Cambodian School Project

  • Madison, WI
  • www.khmerschool.org

Mission Statement

We educate poor farm children who will be unable to support themselves as farmers in Cambodia's changing economy. We have built 4 elementary schools and a technical school in Siem Reap Province. We supply every elementary student with a school uniform each year, as well as school supplies and sports equipment. We fund improvements at each school each year. With our partners from the Czech Republic, we built and support a technical school where we teach young adults English, computer skills and tailoring. We have placed every member of our first two classes (classes last one year) in jobs, all of whom are still working. We provide used bicycles for remote graduates of elementary schools so they can get to high school, and for our technical students so they can get to work. We cover our own fund raising expenses so all contributions we receive go to our project in Cambodia.

Main Programs

  1. JHP Skola Technical School
  2. Kok Thmey Primary School
  3. Kuoy School
  4. Poum Steung School
  5. Srei Pou School
  6. Tampoung School

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Service Areas

Self-reported

International

We operate in rural Siem Reap Province, Cambodia. Our technical school is in the town of Puok (JHP Skola Technical School). Our elementary schools are in the villages of Poum Steung, Tampoeung, Srei Pou and an un-named village near Srei Nouy where our school for the resettled Kouy ethnic group is located.

ruling year

2004

President of the Board since 1992

Self-reported

Sarith Ou

Secretary of the Board since 1995

Self-reported

Roger Garms

Keywords

Self-reported

Cambodia, poor, children, school, jobs

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EIN

02-0672858

 Number

0496249277

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

(Single Organization Support) (B11)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The single biggest problem in primary education, according to a Cambodian government report, is low school attendance and high rates of dropping out. Well over 90% of our students attend our schools regularly and graduate. Another large problem among the rural poor is poor nutrition. We have put in organic vegetable gardens at 3 of our schools, all of which are used to feed our students.

Unemployment is a large undocumented problem for young adults in rural areas. There is no longer enough land to farm and almost no industry. Our technical school has educated and placed 40 young adults, both boys and girls, for the 2 years it has been open.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

JHP Skola Technical School

Provide support for technical school that provides tuition-free classes in English, computer use, computer repair and/or sewing to students. Upon completion of their year of training, the students are assisted in job placement. Students are taught organic gardening skills and grow a significant portion of their food.

Category

Vocational Education

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

None

Budget

$22,500.00

Program 2

Kok Thmey Primary School

This school was built by CSP funds in a partnership with the village leaders. We provide school uniforms, regular improvements to the school facility, funding for school materials, and recognition for the school teachers. Graduates selected by the village because of their poverty are provided with bicycles so that they can bike to the high school some 8 miles away by unpaved path.

Category

Elementary & Secondary Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

None

Budget

$100.00

Program 3

Kuoy School

This school was built by CSP funds in a partnership with the village leaders. We provide school uniforms, regular improvements to the school facility, funding for school materials, and recognition for the school teachers. Graduates selected by the village because of their poverty are provided with bicycles so that they can bike to the high school some 8 miles away by unpaved path.

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

None

Budget

$2,100.00

Program 4

Poum Steung School

This school was built by CSP funds in a partnership with the village leaders. We provide school uniforms, regular improvements to the school facility, funding for school materials, and recognition for the school teachers. Graduates selected by the village because of their poverty are provided with bicycles so that they can bike to the high school some 8 miles away by unpaved path. Students at this school also have begun organic gardening to provide produce to use in supplementing the diet of the students.

Category

Elementary & Secondary Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

None

Budget

$3,600.00

Program 5

Srei Pou School

This school was built by CSP funds in a partnership with the village leaders. We provide school uniforms, regular improvements to the school facility, funding for school materials, and recognition for the school teachers. Graduates selected by the village because of their poverty are provided with bicycles so that they can bike to the high school some 8 miles away by unpaved path.

Category

Elementary & Secondary Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

None

Budget

$1,900.00

Program 6

Tampoung School

This school was built by CSP funds in a partnership with the village leaders. We provide school uniforms, regular improvements to the school facility, funding for school materials, and recognition for the school teachers. Graduates selected by the village because of their poverty are provided with bicycles so that they can bike to the high school some 8 miles away by unpaved path.

Category

Elementary & Secondary Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

None

Budget

$800.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    We wish to improve literacy, school attendance and graduation rates in our primary schools.

    We wish to train and place our technical school students in permanent jobs.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    We join with local politicians, school officials, parents and local monks to meet and plan for our schools. Together we share resources and make these plans. We follow up each year with funds for improvements and we provide school uniforms for all students. This has served to change attitude in the villages so that parents are more supportive of attending school and the villagers feel that they own their school. We provided used bicycles to graduates who live far away so they can commute to high school and graduate. In our technical school, we train for one year, then fund internships and early job placement (which we find) until the graduates are fully employed. Our schools, teachers, parents and officials meet whenever there is a school related issue to discuss so we maintain our partnerships.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    We have, so far, met our goals. In our oldest primary school, over 95% of students graduated and 75% went on to high school. This is double the primary students and triple the high school student attending when we started the school 12 years ago. Our other schools have also improved dramatically, with attendance above 90% in every school and high school attendance increasing as we supply graduates who need it with transportation. Our technical school has graduated and placed all students in its two years of existence. We have completed a large organic garden there, installed a fish pond and chicken coop and have enough production to feed our students and give some surplus to the neighbors. Three of our elementary schools also have gardens.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Students will stay in school and will get jobs. Teacher retention rates will remain high. Villagers will volunteer at the school. Schools will improve, physically: At two of our schools, we have supplied materials and the parents have built an outdoor kitchen where meals for students are prepared. At one school, we and the village split the cost of a piece of land next door that we are using this year to increase the size of our garden. At another school we split the cost of road repair after floods and the road by the school is in good condition now. We have added wells or ponds to 4 of our 5 schools. We have a solar electric system at our technical school. We supplied materials so parents could build a bridge over the small river near a school, making access much shorter.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    We have not managed to raise any money to speak of in Cambodia. We have a model school, with organic gardens and fish farming, where good teaching and learning goes on every day. We had hoped to invite visitors from nearby Siem Reap, which entertains over a million tourists a year who come to Angkor Wat. We hoped that if some of these travelers would come to visit our school, they might be willing to donate and help out. We have been unable to compete with other attractions, however, and still have not raised funds this way.
    We have had some volunteers, and are better prepared for this now, but will need to revamp our website and extend our Facebook presence to do better at this. These improvements are under way.
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

We operate in rural Siem Reap Province, Cambodia. Our technical school is in the town of Puok (JHP Skola Technical School). Our elementary schools are in the villages of Poum Steung, Tampoeung, Srei Pou and an un-named village near Srei Nouy where our school for the resettled Kouy ethnic group is located.

External Reviews

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Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Cambodian School Project

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2010, 2008 and 2008
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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President of the Board

Sarith Ou

Secretary of the Board

Roger Garms

BIO

Mr. Ou was a Cambodian refugee to the United States who has now returned to live in Cambodia. He lost both parents and a younger sister during the Cambodian holocaust. He was a guerrilla fighter against the Khmer Rouge, escaped over the border to Thailand and was in a refugee camp there before coming to the U.S. He was the leader of the Cambodian refugees in Madison, WI. He chaired their Board that built a temple and brought a monk to it from Cambodia. He was president of the board of United Refugee Services and a board member for the mental health center. He co-founded the Cambodian School Project in 1994 when he began to visit Cambodia and help poor rural children stay in school. He supervised the building of our 5 schools and the running of our technical school.

STATEMENT FROM THE President of the Board

"Our goal is to assist poor children from rural Cambodia get an education. We have built 4 primary schools and a technical school for young adults. We provide school uniforms and school supplies for all our primary student (some 1,600 all together). We support our students at the technical school with room and board as needed. All are poor and we charge no tuition.

We strive to send all the contributions we receive from others to Cambodia. We do not charge for fund-raising or our own personal expenses to do this. We have excellent school attendance and have place our technical school graduates in jobs."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Sarith Ou

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

No

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?