Arts, Culture, and Humanities

Concord Museum (Concord Antiquarian Society)

  • Concord, MA
  • www.concordmuseum.org

Mission Statement

The Concord Museum educates visitors of all ages about the history of Concord and its continuing influence on American political, literary, and cultural life. The Museum's nationally significant collection serves as a catalyst for changing exhibitions, extended classroom learning, dynamic programs and publications relevant to an ever-changing world. Founded in 1886, the Museum is a center of cultural enjoyment for the region and a gateway to the town of Concord for visitors from around the world.

Main Programs

  1. 1) School Programs
  2. 2) The Concord Museum Collection
  3. 3) Permanent and Changing Exhibitions
  4. 4) Public Programs
  5. 5) Community Outreach Programs
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

ruling year

1929

Principal Officer since 2011

Self-reported

Dr. Margaret R. Burke

Keywords

Self-reported

Concord Museum, Concord Antiquarian Society, Family Trees, American Revolution, Literary Renaissance

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Also Known As

Concord Museum

EIN

04-2104035

 Number

7207953430

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

Museum & Museum Activities (A50)

History Museums (A54)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The Concord Museum presented exciting exhibits and programs in 2012, which significantly expanded audiences and reach. For example, the Museum was the only New England venue for the major show, Annie Leibovitz: Pilgrimage, which attracted unprecedented media attention and new visitors. Museum attendance in 2012 increased by 50% over 2011, and memberships are up by 47%. The Museum is successfully expanding its financial base. Annual Fund revenues have grown by 36% since 2011. We have received significant new support from local, state, and national agencies and foundations, including a $141K grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services for Early Spring: Henry Thoreau and Climate Change. More than $100K in additional funds were raised for changing exhibits. Our Guild of Volunteers organized seven successful fundraising events, exceeding its annual goal. With $262K in capital grants, we are completing extensive preservation work on the Museum's 1930 building, including masonry repairs and a new slate roof. A new 5-year Strategic Plan, created with significant Board, community, and staff input, has established ambitious goals for Engagement, Education, Collaboration, Financial Sustainability, and a Campus Master Plan. Community outreach is greatly expanding. A new Community Access Program (CAP), in partnership with the Concord-Carlisle Community Chest, provides deeply discounted admission to area groups. New partnerships with the YMCA of Greater Boston and Big Brothers Big Sisters offer free admission to participants. Building upon 2012, top goals for 2013 are to:Broaden and deepen our reach to underserved communities in the region by establishing a vigorous and robust educational outreach programCreate a campus master plan, laying the groundwork for a capital campaignExpand marketing, including the creation of a new marketing positionFurther broaden our donor baseCollaborate in meaningful ways with other area community and history organizations

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

1) School Programs

The Museum is a vital educational resource. More than 7,000 K-12 students from all socio-economic backgrounds and more than 50 towns across Massachusetts and 15 states visit the Museum annually for award-winning object-based learning programs. On-site school programs enable students to learn from real artifacts and to discover the origins of the American ideals of freedom, self-government, and the ability of individuals to affect change. Students explore the world of Thoreau, analyze objects and documents as primary sources, and solve dilemmas as 18th-century citizens. Historical detective work and role-playing are combined with problem solving, tactile learning, and critical thinking so that students have fun and come away with a real sense of history. Programs align with State Curriculum Frameworks and are multi-disciplinary to support students with different learning styles. Programs for students with special needs, English language-learners, and home-school groups are also offered.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

$135,300.00

Program 2

2) The Concord Museum Collection

The Museum's superb collection of 35,000 objects is the only comprehensive collection of Concord history and culture. It contains American icons, such as Paul Revere's lantern; exceptional Revolutionary War artifacts; the contents of Henry David Thoreau's cabin at Walden Pond, including the desk on which he wrote Walden; Ralph Waldo Emerson's study; and superior Native American holdings. It also includes major holdings related to everyday life in the area, including well-documented paintings, furniture, clocks, silver, and textiles. The Museum maintains a high standard of professional collections care and follows museum best practices in the cataloguing, exhibition, storage, and conservation of objects. A new website offers a searchable online database of the Henry David Thoreau collection, the largest collection of Thoreau objects in the world. The Museum seeks grant support to digitize and provide online access to the remainder of its collection.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Adults

Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)

Other Named Groups

Budget

$169,100.00

Program 3

3) Permanent and Changing Exhibitions

The Museum's core exhibition, Why Concord?, uses the collections to explore Concord's remarkable role in our shared national values of freedom, self-government, environmentalism, and individual choice. An active roster of changing exhibitions explores new ideas and puts the Museum's collections in a broader national context. In 2012, the Museum was the first stop on a national tour and only New England venue for the exhibition, Annie Leibovitz: Pilgrimage, organized by the Smithsonian Museum of American Art. In 2013, Early Spring: Henry Thoreau and Climate Change, explores three centuries of careful observation of seasonal data in Concord, which has made the town one of the best places in the world to study climate change. A new mobile application, Concord's Thoreau Trail, engages visitors inside and out. In the fall, Daniel Chester French: Sculpture from His Concord and Chesterwood Studios, will be the first show of this renowned sculptor in 30 years.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Other Named Groups

Adults

Other Named Groups

Budget

$659,800.00

Program 4

4) Public Programs

The Museum's public and family programs foster a lifelong love of history, literature, community culture, and the arts. An engaging and diverse calendar of public programs maximizes our ability to reach broad local, regional, and national audiences and has established the Museum as a center for learning and cultural enjoyment for all ages. The Museum is a trusted resource for exploring the important principles that have shaped America. Accordingly, the Museum strives to offer an array of widely appealing programs to enhance awareness of Concord's past and its influence on American political, literary, and cultural life. Programs include forums, lectures, gallery talks, informal discussions, film screenings, author readings, town walks, community-based programs and open houses, living history performances, family-focused programs, craft workshops for adults and children, and hands-on history programs. Attendance at public programs, exhibition openings, and events increased 127% in FY12.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Adults

Other Named Groups

Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)

Budget

$84,500.00

Program 5

5) Community Outreach Programs

The Museum is deeply committed to serving students from all socio-economic backgrounds, broadening horizons, and enriching lives across generations. Accordingly, we partner with a broad group of area organizations, such as Big Brothers Big Sisters, local Boys and Girls Clubs, and the Highland Street Foundation, to offer free or greatly reduced admission. Our Community Access Program (CAP) provides deeply discounted admission to clients of agencies supported by the Concord-Carlisle Community Chest, including Open Table, Concord Family and Youth Services, Concord Housing Authority, Domestic Violence Services Network, and Minuteman Arc. We also seek to reach students, regardless of socio-economic background, through participation in programs such as the Associated Grant Makers Summer Fund camp programs and the YMCA of Greater Boston's Summer Learning Project, designed to close the achievement gap between low-income students and their higher income peers.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Other Named Groups

Other Named Groups

Budget

$35,800.00

Service Areas

Self-reported

International

Funding Needs

Educational outreach: A key goal in our new Strategic Plan is the establishment of a robust and sustainable educational outreach model for underserved youth. Accordingly, we seek a $100K challenge grant to establish a 3-year pilot program to offer our education programs to low-income schools in Middlesex County.Space: Our programs, collections, and operations have outgrown current space. A campus master plan, costing $100K, will provide the framework for addressing these needs to accommodate our growing visitors, programs, collection, and staff.Digitizing our collection: While the Museum's new website offers a searchable online database of our Thoreau collection, we seek funding to digitize and provide online access to the remainder of our superb collection. Project costs total $150K.Upgrade of permanent exhibitions, installed in 1993: More fully engaging our many audiences is a top priority. A more flexible design and the creative use of technology will make exhibits more accessible to all visitors, particularly younger learners. Costs will be identified through the campus master plan.Preserving the teaching of history: History education is eroding, along with the lack of public engagement with history. The Museum is working with the Town to bring History Day, a national program, to Concord public schools. The cost of this multi-faceted effort over several years is $100K.

Accreditations

American Association of Museums

Affiliations + Memberships

American Association for State and Local History

Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau

American Association of Museums - Member

Metrowest Nonprofit Network

Women in Development

photos


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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Concord Antiquarian Society
Fiscal year: Oct 01-Sep 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Concord Museum (Concord Antiquarian Society)

Leadership

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Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
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Principal Officer

Dr. Margaret R. Burke

BIO

Margaret R. Burke was appointed Executive Director of the Concord Museum in 2011. She brings visionary and strategic leadership skills, strong museum and other not-for-profit management experience, an exceptional fund-raising track record, and an outstanding background in the arts and humanities. From 2007-2011, Ms. Burke was Director of Foundation Development at WGBH in Boston, where she oversaw a 10-person department raising national foundation support for programs such as American Experience, FRONTLINE, Masterpiece, and NOVA. From 2002-2007, she was Executive Director of the Maryland Humanities Council, a statewide grant-making foundation that she transformed into a vigorous and visible institution providing meaningful public humanities programs to 1.5 million Marylanders each year. A major statewide initiative, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Remembrance and Reconciliation, was awarded the Schwartz Prize from the Federation of State Humanities Councils for nationally significant public humanities programs. She authored History and Social Studies in Maryland: A Cause for Concern, revealing the narrowing of the arts and humanities curriculum in Maryland public schools, and co-chaired the Social Studies Task Force for the Maryland State Department of Education, resulting in significant curriculum reform. Previously, as a cultural resources consultant, Ms. Burke provided professional services in strategic planning, organizational development, programming, and fund-raising to organizations throughout New England and the mid-Atlantic region. She was Director of Museums and Properties and Director of Development at Historic New England (formerly SPNEA); and Curator of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art. A scholar in the field of American art, Ms. Burke holds a Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Delaware, an M.A. in Early American Culture from The Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum and the University of Delaware, and a B.A. in Art History from Wheaton College.

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

" The Concord Museum was founded by Cummings Davis, a self-educated man of modest means who recognized the importance of preserving the history of this town of national historic significance. Today, 150 years after he first exhibited his collection, the public understanding of history and its shared value has greatly diminished. With the hope of strengthening our common bonds, the Museum's new Strategic Plan seeks to address the erosion of history education in schools and the public's lack of engagement with history. Our spectacular collections, combined with our location in a town of national historic importance, uniquely position the Museum to offer leadership in history education. A key goal identified in the Strategic Plan is to serve as an advocate and major resource--locally and regionally--for history education in Massachusetts schools. Although it is essential for students to learn about history to become better citizens and to understand critical lessons that can drawn from the past, American history has been increasingly marginalized in our schools' curriculums. Recent studies such as the 2010 National Assessment of Educational Progress show that American schools are failing to educate students about the past. Research on core knowledge indicates that museums such as the Concord Museum that undertake object-based experiential learning can best fill that gap. The Museum's unique school programs connect real artifacts with people, places, and ideas. Serving more than 7,000 students annually, we have built strong partnerships with area schools over the last four decades and look to expand and deepen those relationships with schools throughout Middlesex County, especially in low-income areas. To achieve our mission to serve as a center for dynamic extended classroom learning for all, we feel that it is imperative to establish a robust educational outreach program for underserved audiences. The Museum's nationally significant collection and location in historic Concord also provide a singular opportunity for it to serve as a model for reversing the trend of declining attendance at history museums. Our overall visitation increased by 50% last year, and we continually strive to reach new and expand existing audiences through dynamic exhibitions and programs that stimulate critical thinking about the past and its relevance to the present. As we evolve from a traditional history museum into a more engaging resource providing opportunities for deeper public involvement, we are well-positioned to provide leadership for other history organizations. "

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Churchill G. Franklin

Acadian Asset Management LLC

Term: Sept 2009 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?