Educational Institutions

JFYNetWorks

  • Boston, MA
  • www.jfynet.org

Mission Statement

JFYNetWorks is a Boston-based nonprofit organization with the mission of providing increased opportunity to disadvantaged urban youth and adults. For nearly 40 years, JFYNetWorks has served high-need populations in Massachusetts by developing and delivering education and job training programs that equip young people with the skills needed to succeed in our changing economy. JFYNetWorks brings student-centered and data-driven instructional resources and assessments into classrooms, supports teachers in using these tools effectively, and ultimately helps students both graduate from high school and enter college at the credit-earning level.

Main Programs

  1. JFYNet College Readiness
  2. JFYNetWorks Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) Preparation
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

JFYNetWorks serves youth in schools primarily throughout the state of Massachusetts, as well as Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD. Last year, we worked directly with 13 schools.

ruling year

1977

Principal Officer since 1985

Self-reported

Mr. Gary Kaplan

Keywords

Self-reported

"JFYNet", "Jobs for Youth-Boston", "JFY", "college readiness", "blended learning"

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EIN

04-2607239

 Number

1129491788

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Secondary/High School (B25)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

JFYNetWorks addresses the need for developing college-level skills in high school. An associate's degree is worth $330,000 more in lifetime earnings than a high school diploma; a bachelor's degree $840,000. However, fewer than half of our high school graduates complete any level of post-secondary degree or certificate. In community colleges, 63% of incoming high school graduates are assigned to remedial courses because they do not have the requisite skills to perform at the college level. Remedial courses cost students full tuition and fees but give no degree credit, causing a drain on students' limited financial resources and valuable time that could otherwise be spent earning college credit. A staggering 90% of remedial students drop out of community college without a degree. JFYNetWorks addresses this college readiness problem by providing focused blended learning programs in high school to help students build the academic skills they need to enter college or technical training earning academic credit. We administer the state-mandated Accuplacer college placement exam and enroll students in an online curriculum tailored to their individual needs. By integrating our instruction with regular math and English classes, we maximize classroom time and teacher expertise to focus on the particular skills needed for college success. At the conclusion of instruction, we re-administer the Accuplacer test. We send passing scores directly to colleges, exempting students from corresponding remedial courses. Our use of the Accuplacer, integration into the school curriculum, and direct conversion of program results into remedial exemptions are unique among college-focused services. The JFYNetWorks blended program model -- infusing specialized online content into the regular curriculum -- also facilitates scalability, as the low cost of the online platform can easily be expanded to entire schools.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

JFYNet College Readiness

We administer the state-mandated Accuplacer college placement exam and enroll students in an online curriculum tailored to their individual needs. By integrating our instruction with regular math and English classes, we maximize classroom time and teacher expertise to focus on the particular skills needed for college success. At the conclusion of instruction, we re-administer the Accuplacer test. We send passing scores directly to colleges, exempting students from corresponding remedial courses. Our use of the Accuplacer, integration into the school curriculum, and direct conversion of program results into remedial exemptions are unique among college-focused services. The JFYNetWorks blended program model -- infusing specialized online content into the regular curriculum -- also facilitates scalability, as the low cost of the online platform can easily be expanded to entire schools.

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

$495,596.00

Program 2

JFYNetWorks Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) Preparation

The JFYNetWorks MCAS Preparation program is designed to help 9th and 10th grade students reach Common Core-aligned standards with the goal of on-time grade progression and ultimately successful graduation from high school and success in college.

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

$242,498.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The overall goal of JFYNetWorks is to ensure that all high school graduates are college and career ready. We accomplish our goal by building statewide networks of college readiness programs in high schools designed to eliminate the need for remedial courses in college. The official state definition of college and career readiness is ""Successful achievement of specified levels of competence in English Language Arts/Literacy and Mathematics … to be placed into entry-level courses in college or … certificate or workplace training programs without the need for remediation. "" The ""specified levels of competence"" are defined by cutoff scores on the Accuplacer college placement tests, a suite of assessments adopted in 1998 by the Board of Higher Education as the Massachusetts statewide standard. JFYNetWorks administers the Accuplacer tests in high school, uses the results to place students in the appropriate level of our online curriculum, monitors each student's progress through the curriculum, and administers the Accuplacer again at the end of the course. If the final scores meet college cutoff scores, the test report is sent to the college and the student is exempted from the corresponding remedial courses. Ultimately, our goal is to make JFYNet available to every high school student who needs help reaching college and career-ready standards. We quantify this target population in Massachusetts at 7500—the annual total of high school graduates enrolled in remedial courses in our state higher education system. We will reach that goal over the next three years.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    JFYNetWorks provides blended learning that combines online and teacher-led instruction in the classroom. Combining online resources with teacher direction gives students a wide range of materials to learn from and teachers a wide range of teaching tools to select from. Each JFYNetWorks partner school has an assigned Blended Learning Specialist who performs a range of supportive functions: orienting students to the program and to college placement tests, administering assessments, enrolling students in the online curriculum, providing teachers with ongoing support, and professional development to master the blended learning method and use real-time student performance data to differentiate instruction. The program structure is abbreviated as AIM2: Assess, Instruct, Measure, Manage. Assessment of student needs is the first step. In 11th and 12th grade this means administering the four Accuplacer Diagnostic tests in English and math. These assessments determine where the student is placed in the online curriculum. At the 9th and 10th grade MCAS level, assessment is performed with Common Core-aligned tests. Instruction is the core of the program. JFYNetWorks curates a high-quality library of software to meet varied student needs. Online instruction offers flexibility in choice and utilization of materials. It is also by nature self-paced. No other form of instruction allows as much control of content and pace. The power to individualize instruction is a necessary capability when dealing with the diversity of student skills, learning styles, languages and cultural backgrounds that characterize urban schools. Measurement means tracking student activity online by following individual progress through the curriculum and performance on embedded mastery quizzes. JFYNet software allows for monitoring progress and addressing problems in real time. Management is onsite and online oversight and support using online student activity data to make reports and recommendations to teachers and administrators that keep students on track. JFY staff visit each school regularly throughout the year to confer on student performance and instructional strategies. Hands-on professional development with teachers builds skill and confidence in the blended methodology, gradually transforming teaching practice so that all instruction becomes student-centered. JFYNet served 3000 students in 2014-15 and plans for 4000 in school year 2015-16. Participation is 1-2 hours per week with 34 weeks available for instruction.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    JFYNetWorks has provided support to high school students and young adults for nearly 40 years, and has a proven track record of making a measurable difference on high school graduation, college entrance, and college success performance metrics. Through strong leadership and the keen ability to pivot organizational priorities to fit changing academic and economic demands, JFYNetWorks has solidified its ability to support low-income students in the skills they need most to succeed. Our combination of deep expertise, efficient cost structure, a solid funding base, and organizational capacity provides a foundation uniquely suited to eliminating the college preparation gap, particularly for low-income students. JFYNetWorks has been recognized for our successes from the White House College Opportunity Summit to the state, local, and individual school levels. Financially, JFYNetWorks successfully achieved a dedicated line item in the Massachusetts state budget for the first time in FY 2016, providing a solid foundation for continued, sustained impact as we work to meet our goals. The fact that JFYNetWorks is named in the line item as the implementer of the statewide college and career readiness program confirms that the organization has established itself as a reliable, consistent, trusted producer of student achievement gains. Additionally, our cost structure is highly efficient, with our per student cost covered via state appropriations, school district fees, and private philanthropy. In fundraising terms, every dollar raised is tripled in impact thanks to this tripartite model. We have saved students over $1M in tuition and fees thanks to the success of the JFYNet College Readiness program. This is only the immediate financial return on better preparation for success in post-secondary education and in life. Staff members include Executive Director Gary Kaplan as project manager and four outstanding professional blended learning specialists. In addition, Deputy Director Paula Paris provides grant management, program compliance, and fund cultivation, and Fiscal Director Patricia Parisella provides financial management and fiscal accountability. Gary has provided visionary leadership to JFYNetWorks since 1985. During his tenure, JFYNetWorks has addressed the issues of literacy and job skills among youth and adults with a series of innovative programs. Gary's career in education and training began in the 1960s with the Upward Bound program, where he counseled and taught urban youth. He served on Governor Patrick's Workforce Development transition team, the Workforce Accountability Task Force, the Governor's Advisory Commission on STEM, and the National Commission on Jobs and the Economy. Gary earned a Bachelor of Arts from Northwestern University and a Master of Arts from the University of Chicago. Additional staff details may be found here: https://jfynet.org/jfy-staff/.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    JFYNet conducts two programs: JFYNet College Readiness and Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) Preparation. Each has its own metrics. College Readiness Metrics The success measurement in College Readiness is increased points on the Accuplacer tests after participation in the JFYNet blending learning program. The benchmarks are point gains and remedial courses eliminated. Accuplacer is the suite of College Board skill assessments that all Massachusetts community colleges and state universities and many other colleges use to place students into either credit-bearing courses or non-credit remedial courses. Four standard Accuplacer tests are used by most institutions: Arithmetic, Algebra, Reading Comprehension and Sentence Skills. Pre-test scores for JFYNet's population typically range low enough to place a student in three or more developmental courses. The task of JFYNet is to increase those scores and eliminate remedial courses. In school year 2014-15, the average gain of 20 points was enough to test out of 449 remedial courses. In AY 2014-2015, 1723 students were enrolled in JFYNet Accuplacer Competency. 82% of those who pre and post-tested gained points; the average was 20 points. The gains reduced the number of remedial courses by 44% of the pre-test total. At average community college tuition and fees these students saved $246,000 — money that would have been wasted on non-credit remedial courses, that could instead be invested in courses leading to a degree. MCAS: In Academic Year 2014-15 JFYNet prepared 1121 students in 2 high schools for the 10th grade MCAS. Schools customarily assign their lowest-performing students because those are the students whose performance impacts school ranking. One school's MCAS scores improved by 9 percentage points in English and 7 points in math. In 2015-16 we intend to bring on up to four new schools, all predominantly high needs, low-income and minority, to increase our enrollment from 3000 to 4000. Our performance goal is to eliminate 50% of remedial courses and save students $250,000 in tuition and fees. We will measure our success by (1) point gains on the Accuplacer college placement test, (2) number of remedial college courses eliminated, (3) dollar value of remedial tuitions and fees saved to students, (4) improved MCAS scores, (5) teacher and administrator satisfaction surveys, and (6) testimonies and stories from students and teachers about the impact of the program on their lives.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    The business community and the legislature recognize that the skilled worker gap can be closed by reducing the number of high school graduates lost to remedial college courses. The number lost at the community colleges alone, 6000, would fill the gap. This is why both the state and private funding community have empowered JFYNetWorks to establish a statewide college and career readiness program. In FY 2015, JFYNetWorks operated programs in eleven schools in Massachusetts and one outside the state. Our total enrollment was 3,192. Enrollment is projected to exceed 4,000 in FY 2016. Our three-year growth plan will reach an annual capacity in excess of 7,500 students, the total annual number of high school graduates in remedial college courses statewide. The scale of the college readiness issue is manageable. JFYNetWorks is equipped to reach that scale. Workforce needs will increasingly drive education policy as economic growth and changing demographics produce more and more critical shortages of skilled workers. JFYNetWorks' unique position at the nexus of education and workforce development-College and Career Readiness—and our documented ability to raise student/worker skill levels provide a powerful platform for future growth in Massachusetts and nationally. On December 10, 2015, the Every Student Succeeds Act was signed into law. This new federal education law reaffirms the goal of College and Career Readiness, identifies blended learning and digital learning as approved methodologies, and specifically authorizes funding for the programmatic components of JFYNet. This federal action completes the spectrum of local, state and federal support for the mission and methods of JFYNetWorks.
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

JFYNetWorks serves youth in schools primarily throughout the state of Massachusetts, as well as Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD. Last year, we worked directly with 13 schools.

Social Media

Funding Needs

Large numbers of young people, 40% according to the U.S. Department of Education, are leaving our high schools without the basic academic skills needed to qualify for college entrance at the credit-earning level—the definition of ""College and Career Readiness."" This skill deficit severely limits long-term career prospects. A college degree is now the minimum credential required for meaningful participation in the workforce. In addition to higher lifetime earnings potential for college graduates, the unemployment rate for workers without a college degree is double that of those with a degree. Yet 63% of Massachusetts high school graduates who enter community colleges must take remedial courses, 6000 students each year. Nine out of ten of these students drop out before completing a degree. Rates of remedial placement correlate directly to income and demographics, so the penalty of being unprepared falls heaviest on those who need college the most— low-income, minority, and underperforming community college entrants whose hopes for a sustainable future depend entirely on their ability to get a two-year degree, the first step up the economic ladder. Remedial courses cost students their financial resources and time, and their futures.

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

JFYNetWorks, A Non-profit Corporation
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

JFYNetWorks

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Mr. Gary Kaplan

BIO

Gary Kaplan has been executive director of JFYNetWorks since 1985. During his tenure, JFYNetWorks has addressed the issues of literacy and job skills among youth and adults with a series of innovative programs in competency-based GED curricula, entrepreneurship training, the alternative high school diploma, industry-based skill training in biotechnology, health care, financial services, environmental technology and green jobs, and the JFYNet e-learning program which creates and supports technology-based academic instruction programs in schools throughout Massachusetts.Mr. Kaplan's career in education and training began in the 1960s with the Upward Bound program, where he counseled and taught urban youth. He served on Governor Patrick's Workforce Development transition team and on the Workforce Accountability Task Force. He is a current member of the Governor's Advisory Commission on STEM and the UMass Lowell Clean Energy Career Workgroup. He is also a member of the National Commission on Energy Policy's Task Force on America's Future Energy Jobs. He holds a bachelor's degree from Northwestern University and master's degree from the University of Chicago.

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

"The following elements distinguish JFYNet from other college readiness programs: * Focusing on academic skills needed for college-level work. * Targeting students generally not served by other programs - GPA below 2.5, low MCAS scores. * Focusing on community college as the most viable pathway for low-income students * Focusing on the Accuplacer - the gateway community college standard -- rather than the SAT. * Community colleges accept Accuplacer score reports from JFY. Students do not have to take the tests again. * Students benefit from individualized instruction targeted to their learning needs. Blended learning enables JFY to scale the program. * Working with teachers and students in their regular academic classes ensures the program's alignment with the regular curriculum. * Working as a classroom partner with public school teachers in a collaborative model. * JFYNet is the only program of its kind in Massachusetts, and the largest college readiness program in Greater Boston. "

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Otis A. Gates

United Housing Management

Term: Jan 1998 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?