Educational Institutions

International Yacht Restoration School, Inc.

  • Newport, RI
  • http://www.iyrs.edu

Mission Statement

The IYRS Mission:

-- To teach the skills, history, art, and science of making, building, maintaining, and restoring;
-- To preserve the knowledge, heritage, craftsmanship and aesthetic genius inherent in these objects;
-- To show that honest work, integrity and mastery of a craft are among life's great achievements.


IYRS is state-certified and accredited by the ACCSCT. IYRS is a world-class experiential learning school dedicated to teaching highly technical and deeply craft-oriented skills. The school’s education model is based on a proven methodology that combines hands-on problem-solving with important career skills, including teamwork, project management, and critical thinking. IYRS has three accredited schools: School of Composites Technology, School of Boatbuilding & Restoration, and School of Marine Systems.

IYRS is a launch pad for a wide range of career paths. Some graduates travel around the world as race-boat shore crew; some set up their own business; others go into education or onto curatorial careers; some head to jobs with a diverse range of companies working with many different materials, including laminates, fiberglass and carbon fiber. The commonality is that IYRS grads leave each program feeling confident in their abilities and ready to work in their chosen industry. IYRS student services help each student define career goals, network with alumni and industry partners, and secure internships and jobs. Visit our website, www.iyrs.edu, for alumni stories and to see where our grads have gone on to work. Hear our students' stories at www.iyrs.edu/videos

Main Programs

  1. Program 1
  2. School of Boatbuilding and Restoration
  3. School of Composites Technology
  4. School of Marine Systems

ruling year

1993

President since 2004

Self-reported

Mr. Terry Nathan

CFO/COO since 2011

Self-reported

Mrs. Rhonda Landers

Keywords

Self-reported

Education, Technology, Composites, Maritime, Boat, History, Yacht

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Also Known As

IYRS

EIN

05-0470320

 Number

4022239743

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Vocational Technical (B30)

Historical Societies and Related Activities (A80)

Historical Societies and Related Activities (A80)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

IYRS was founded in 1995 and made its home in Newport on a waterfront tract of land with two abandoned historic buildings. The school is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC). The ACCSC has awarded IYRS a “School of Distinction” award for its excellence in training and graduate outcomes, along with five-year accreditation, the commission’s maximum term of accreditation.

As a result of the collective progress of the school’s programs and campus development, IYRS is acknowledged in the community and region as an important contributor to economic development and quality of life. From 2005 – 2012, IYRS invested over $10 million in program creation and building and campus development in order to create a strong foundation for delivering its core education mission. Approximately 18,000 people visit IYRS each year to see the school and its students in action. It is one of Newport’s centerpieces with still more opportunity ahead.

85% job placement between 2008 and 2013
100% internship placement
3 full time experiential learning programs
Students from 18 countries and 25 states
11:1 student / faculty ratio
35+ hours per week in the shop
13% of incoming 2012 class were Veterans
2 local universities accept IYRS certificates for credits

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

In addition to the school and our public programs, IYRS is in the process of restoring Coronet, America's most historic yacht. Coronet was built in 1885 and survives today with much of her original fabric, including a Victorian interior, intact. The Coronet project has much to offer the fields of maritime preservation, American history, and decorative arts. The project will also support the IYRS educational program by offering unique challenges to our advanced students.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Program 2

School of Boatbuilding and Restoration

SCHOOL OF BOATBUILDING & RESTORATION
Students spend two academic years learning career skills in building, restoring and finishing fine yachts and related joinery work. From mastering the materials to managing your project, they work in teams to restore one boat and build another.

IYRS is the only school in the USA with a 20-month Boatbuilding & Restoration program.

Students transform themselves and their career opportunities. IYRS graduates
pursue careers both in and outside the marine industry with the skills they
develop in the Boatbuilding & Restoration program.

The IYRS School of Boatbuilding & Restoration is about mastering a craft based on the fundamentals of wooden boatbuilding.

The traditional plank-on-frame method is still very valued by today’s builders and boatyards, and remains a core theme of the program. This approach teaches a systematic method of hull construction. It also instructs analytic skills, craftsmanship, and the ability to produce superior work in restoration yards and state-of-the-art boatbuilding facilities.

This program is regarded by many builders and yards as the highest level of industry training, and their willingness to hire IYRS graduates has never been stronger.

The 20-month School of Boatbuilding & Restoration Program at a glance:

Year One

--Safety procedures and small scale projects to develop core wood working skills.
--Hull measurement, lofting, drafting, and half-scale model building.
--Full restoration of a small plank-on-frame boat including documentation, backbone construction, steam bending, planking, spar making, and finish work.
--Boat handling, navigation, and seamanship.
--Independent study project or industry internship during the summer in area of interest.

Year Two

--Restoration of larger plank-on-frame sailboat or power boat.
--Marine business study: How companies operate.
--Survey reporting of an historic yacht.
--Project management, materials estimation, labor costs, contract agreements.
--Advanced lofting techniques, joinery work on cockpits, decks, furniture, hatches, and interior bulkheads.

Category

Vocational Education

Population(s) Served

Adults

Military/Veterans

Female Adults

Budget

$0.00

Program 3

School of Composites Technology

SCHOOL OF COMPOSITES TECHNOLOGY
Students immerse themselves in six months of training with skilled instructors, industry experts, engineers, makers, builders and craftspeople at the leading edge of building with advanced materials.

Composites are rapidly being used in virtually every field of construction today.

Students learn career skills that help make them scalable—from the smallest to larger than life sized construction.

School of Composites Technology:

Building with advanced materials.

6-month programs starting March 2014 and September 2014

Work with next generation building materials, equipment, and techniques
Apply your training in fields such as boatbuilding, aerospace, aviation, wind energy, and construction.

Training in: Vacuum Infusion Processing, Advanced Composites Molding, CAD/CAM Operations, Robotic CNC Plug Building, Composites Restoration Practices, Molding Processes and Methods, In-Mold Coating Techniques, CAD/CAM Equipment Operations

Careers: CNC Operator, Composites Technician, Marine-Certified Composites Technician, CAD/CAM Operations, Carbon Fiber Fabrication/Repair, Boat Builder

This program is sponsored in part by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

The aerospace, wind energy, automotive, marine, and construction industries are just a few places where composites are used. This is because the demand for lighter, stronger building materials has never been greater. Nor is the demand for people who understand how to work with them.

The IYRS School of Composites Technology has four cornerstones: Composites Fundamentals, Composites Manufacturing Methods, Composites Tooling Development, and Composites Repair and Refinishing.

Students learn skills such as vacuum infusion processing, advanced molding, CAD/CAM operations, robotic CNC plug building, repair practices, and more.

During the 6-month program, students prepare to take several ACMA certification exams – the gold standard of composites credentials.

The 6-month School of Composites Technology at a glance:
Course 1. Composites Fundamentals.
Course 2. Composites Manufacturing.
Course 3. Drawing and CAD/CAM.
Course 4. Composites Tooling.
Course 5. Class Project: Boat Construction.
If you are new to composites technology, read more about this dynamic field—including the top five reasons you should consider this profession, and a list of FAQs about composites, their use in industry today, and IYRS training.

The six-month program runs twice a year with the Fall session from September through February and the Spring session from March through August at the school’s satellite campus in Bristol, a Rhode Island coastal town with a high concentration of marine companies.

Classes are held Monday through Friday, from 9 am to 5 pm.

Category

Vocational Education

Population(s) Served

Adults

Military/Veterans

Female Adults

Budget

$0.00

Program 4

School of Marine Systems

SCHOOL OF MARINE SYSTEMS
For six months in a team setting with skilled instructors, students learn the theory and technologies associated with integrated systems. Students learn to install and troubleshoot everything from engines to computer-based electronics.

Whether on land or at sea, IYRS grads have the technical and problem-solving skill set to successfully navigate the challenges ahead.

School of Marine Systems:

Critical training for on board performance.

6-month programs starting March 2014 and September 2014

--Receive hands-on experience under the direction of industry professionals
--Use the latest technologies in preparation for ABYC and NMEA certification exams
Industry internship
--Training in: Electrical Systems, Electronics, Steering, Marine Pumps, Fuel Systems, Diesel Engines, Gasoline Inboard Engines, LPG Systems, AC and Refrigeration, Fire Fighting Systems
Careers: Marine Systems Engineer, Marine Electrician, Diesel Mechanic, Marine Systems Technician, Electrical Designer, Outboard Technician

This 6-month program trains students to install, repair, and maintain every essential system on boats of all sizes: Electrical, navigation, electronics, steering, diesel engines, plumbing, firefighting, HVAC, refrigeration, and more. It’s an intense immersion into the world of modern boat systems.

Students work in teams. They get top-tier instruction and guidance from industry experts. They face the challenges and complexities of today’s technologies, and they emerge with a base of knowledge that will take them into any professional situation with the ability to succeed. Student externships deepen the exposure to actual work environments.

ABYC and NMEA certification exam prep is a core part of the curriculum, so students are ready to take the tests, and enter the industry.

The 6-month School of Marine Systems at a glance:

Systems covered: Electrical, Electronics, Steering, Fuel, Diesel engines, Gasoline inboard engines, Inboard/outboard and sail drive gear systems, Marine pumps, On-board tankage, Marine sanitation, Marine LPG. AC/refrigeration, Fire fighting systems.
Installation, trouble shooting, major systems maintenance and repair for sail and power boats.

Industry internship:
Integration with the Boatbuilding & Restoration and Composites Technology Programs for practical application.

The six-month Marine Systems program runs twice a year with the Fall session from September through February and the Spring session from March through August at the school’s satellite campus in Bristol, a Rhode Island coastal town with a high concentration of marine companies.

Classes are held Monday through Friday, from 9 am to 5 pm.

Category

Vocational Education

Population(s) Served

Adults

Military/Veterans

Female Adults

Budget

$0.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    A core principle of an IYRS education, and a clear path to building lasting self-confidence, is learning through a process of experience and experiment. IYRS teaches students that through failure we learn how to see where things go wrong and, most importantly, how to create positive outcomes. The IYRS education model can be replicated into a broad range of building arts where the common thread is to build, create, manufacture, and innovate in partnership with designers, engineers, and others.

    There are three important concepts to the educational model at IYRS:
    • Teaching the technical and often deep craft skills needed to create three-dimensional objects such as cars, boats, planes, furniture, industrial objects, etc.;
    • Wrapping this knowledge with essential career skills; and
    • Teaching values that include embracing learning as a life-long experience.

    Thanks to support from educators, financiers, industrialists, foundations, and government, IYRS is focused on a plan for long-term sustainability and to help meet the new needs of the 21st century workforce. Through Building the Future of IYRS, we will increase the number of graduates ready for the new economy and expand our program offerings through collaborations with secondary and post-secondary schools. We seek to achieve the following outcomes:

    • Program Development. Grow enrollment from 87 to 160 full-time students by 2016 in existing and newly created accredited programs; the latter in high technology fields that use modern materials like composites and carbon fiber; Goal: $1 million
    • Scholarships: To attract the brightest and motivated students, we also need to grow our endowment and annual fund to provide scholarships based on need, merit and academic achievement. Goal: $4 million
    • Infrastructure: Develop a new best purposes facility to deliver a state-of-the-art educational experience. Goal: $2 million
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Major Initiatives: Expand Experiential Learning to Change Lives and Improve our Regional Economy

    The IYRS education model can be replicated into a broad range of building arts where the common thread is to build, create, manufacture, and innovate in partnership with designers, engineers, and others. The core of our model is based on three important concepts:
    • Teaching the technical and often deep craft skills needed to create three-dimensional objects such as cars, boats, planes, furniture, industrial objects, etc.
    • Wrapping this knowledge with essential career skills; and
    • Teaching values that include embracing learning as a life-long experience.

    IYRS intends to leverage this core competency with its successful outcomes by moving the school into a broader experiential learning institution. IYRS will remain faithful to its deep craft-orientation, but apply the program model to opportunities beyond the marine industry. Some opportunities will be stand-alone programs similar to current offerings; others will be collaborative with engineering, industrial design and related programs to our build programs, per recent joint training with Harvard, RISD, Roger Williams, etc.

    The short, or incremental product plan, is as follows:
    • Continue to improve on existing programs with direct engagement with industry partners;
    • By 2015, add at least two more accredited programs
    • Build more articulation agreements with area colleges to accrue elective credits toward associate and bachelor degrees;
    • Add short-term advanced programming for existing programs;
    • Continue to probe for opportunities that while they may not be vertical market, remain consistent with our core mission and competency of building.

    IYRS will continue to be laser focused on growing the school. Strategy and activities will be measured in terms of how they contribute to fulfilling school mission and goals. This will require constant evaluation of all enterprise-wide activities and resource allocation.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    In 1996, the first IYRS students entered the school’s two-year program in Boatbuilding & Restoration. As IYRS graduates matriculated into the workforce, the school’s reputation for training craftsmen took hold—and a synergy began between the school and the marine industry, an industry that is historically challenged to find the skilled workforce. Since establishing its first educational program in 1996, the school has worked closely with the marine industry to develop new educational programming. In 2004, IYRS launched a continuing education program with an emphasis on professional development. In 2006, a second full-time program in Marine Systems—where students are trained to install, maintain, and troubleshoot onboard systems—was developed in partnership with the American Boat & Yacht Council (ABYC). Working in partnership with organizations such as the Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation, the United Way of Rhode Island and The Rhode Island Foundation Newport County Fund, IYRS developed shorter-term programs for high school students and adults, as well as an annual Marine Industry Career Day, to give individuals the basic training needed to move into the marine workforce and connect with area employers.

    In 2010, IYRS launched its third full-time program, in Composites Technology, in part with funding from the U.S. Department of Labor. The first of its kind in Rhode Island in the rapidly growing composites field, this program was developed to meet a broader training need than just the marine industry, providing graduates with a wide choice of career paths including wind energy, aerospace, construction, and transportation. According to the American Composites Manufacturers Association, the U.S. composites industry employs 550,000 people and generates $70 billion in revenues per year.

    During this same period of program and enrollment growth, the school completed the restoration of its campus. This included a 27,000 square foot historic mill that was completed in 2009 and is currently 100% occupied with the school’s library, administration offices, and commercial tenants, both in and outside the marine trades field. As a result of the collective progress of the school’s programs and campus development, IYRS is acknowledged in the community as an important contributor to economic development and quality of life. Approximately 18,000 people visit IYRS each year to see the school and its students in action. It is one of Newport’s centerpieces with still more opportunity ahead.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    IYRS has built an extraordinary model for educating a generation of makers and builders. The outcomes are indisputable based on our placement rates, despite extraordinary economic headwinds. With external support, the training of builders, makers, restorers, crafts people, and technicians will be enhanced and expanded, not only for the marine trades but for allied fields as well.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    As of September 2013:
    IYRS has 71 students, ages 18-68,15 states, 5 countries, 10 US Military Veterans, an artist, chemist, engineer, Coast Guard, USMC, contractor, real estate agent, college student, US Airforce, skate shop manager, high school student, commercial fisherman.
    IYRS Class of 2014/15 is quite diverse. We expect to reach 100 full time students in the 2013-2014 academic calendar.

    IYRS was founded in 1995 in Newport, Rhode Island to teach highly technical, deeply craft-oriented building skills. Today, IYRS trains in three primary areas: Boatbuilding and Restoration, Marine Systems and Composites Technology. From 2005 – 2012, IYRS invested over $10 million in program creation and building and campus development in order to create a strong foundation for delivering its core education mission. Today, the school is a magnet for talented students from across the US and around the world--students who are passionate about careers that allow them to work with their hands.

    A core principle of an IYRS education, and a clear path to building lasting self-confidence, is learning through a process of experience and experiment. IYRS teaches students that through failure we learn how to see where things go wrong and, most importantly, how to create positive outcomes.

    Over the past 3 years we have awarded $330,000 in financial aid.

    Community Involvement
    IYRS reaches out to the local community, its schools, the general public and other area cultural institutions. Some examples include:
    • The IYRS After-School program hosts students from the Newport area schools;
    • A record number of career professionals and vocational students attend IYRS;
    • Continuing Education workshops cater to restoration enthusiasts and boatyard employees;
    • Hundreds attend our spring and fall lecture series on topics related to boat building and restoration.

    Since 1996, we have graduated 272 students. We have a full time faculty and student service staff of 9; an administrative staff of 12; more than 50 volunteers and a very active 37 member Board of Trustees along with an International Advisory Council. In the 2012-2013 school year enrollment stood at 87: thirty-five students from Rhode Island, 78 from 15 other states across the country, and 9 foreign students. Eight percent of our students are female; 92% male. Thirty out of 40 students requesting financial aid were in the category of financial need designated by federal standards. In 2012-2013 academic calendar, IYRS provided a total of $166,295 in financial aid. We also welcome more than 18,000 visitors a year to our facilities.

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

THE INTERNATIONAL YACHT RESTORATION SCHOOL INC
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

International Yacht Restoration School, Inc.

Leadership

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President

Mr. Terry Nathan

CFO/COO

Mrs. Rhonda Landers

BIO

Terry Nathan is a member of the Board of Trustees and President at IYRS. He joined the school in 2004 following a career of over two decades in the software industry. In 1985, he and two others founded The Media Services Group, a software company for books, magazines, and newspapers. Later, in 2001, he joined two Hewlett Packard execs in a content and digital asset management start-up. He has consulted on technology for major publishers in the U.S. and Canada. Nathan is a coastal cruiser and lover of classic yachts. He is a member of the New York Yacht Club and enjoys life in Newport, as well as the travels and sailing that his current position at IYRS affords him.

STATEMENT FROM THE President

"Building with our hands is the essence of creativity, productivity,
human spirit, and even community—as our knowledge, passion
and our creations are passed along through generations. As
humans, we are driven to do this kind of activity, and to celebrate the
associated art and knowledge, that ability to think through our hands.
Enter IYRS, a school founded initially to reinvigorate and teach these
skills in the world of boat craft and restoration. Along the way, those
traditional and cutting edge skills, and the hands-on way IYRS teaches
them, have helped IYRS develop a whole new experiential education
model—a model that prepares deeply technical and ultra-talented
craftspeople and technicians to work with a range of materials, and
to maintain a range of mechanical systems, to help industry and the
individual. That educational model is this: students immersed both
body and spirit, with a team equally dedicated, in a condensed
timeframe, to transform materials and systems into useful, lasting
things, and in so doing transforming their own lives and careers.
When we build with our hands, immersed with others in the task, we
become attuned to the importance of all that we do.
At IYRS, students learn to make, restore and maintain things with this
heightened sense of purpose and craft, becoming truly in demand
across industries. In the process, they build more meaningful lives,
satisfied and inspired in the knowledge that, in their hands, they have the
power to build almost anything."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Joseph T Dockery

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?