Educational Institutions

Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut

  • Bridgeport, CT
  • www.jawct.org

Mission Statement

Junior Achievement (JA) is the world's largest non-profit organization dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their future, and make smart academic and economic choices. JA programs are delivered by corporate and community volunteers, and provide relevant, hands-on experiences that give students from kindergarten through high school knowledge and skills in financial literacy, college/career readiness and entrepreneurship. JA programs empower students to make a connection between what they learn in school and how it can be applied in the real world - enhancing the relevance of their classroom learning and increasing their understanding of the value of staying in school. Today, Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut (JAWCT) is working in partnership with over 1,000 community/corporate volunteers and educators providing empowering programs to over 22,000 students across 20 communities. JA reaches 4.6 million students per year in 113 markets across the United States, with an additional six million students served by operations in 119 other countries worldwide.

Main Programs

  1. Financial Education
  2. Financial Education-Ansonia, Derby, Seymour and Shelton Schools
Service Areas

Self-reported

Connecticut

JA of Western Connecticut has had a positive influence for students in the following communities: Bridgeport, Fairfield, Stratford, Trumbull, Bethel, Brookfield, Danbury, Monroe, New Fairfield, New Milford, Newtown, Wilton, Ansonia, Derby, Seymour, and Shelton improving educational outcomes for students from all racial, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds by providing empowering financial literacy, work readiness and entreprenurial programs for over 22,000 students in grades K-12.

ruling year

1994

Principal Officer since 2008

Self-reported

Ms. Bernadine Venditto

Keywords

Self-reported

education, business, enterprise,financial literacy,work readiness, Valley

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Also Known As

JA

EIN

06-0644315

 Number

8371738773

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Business, Youth Development (O53)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Our three year strategic plan outlines student growth of 10%; including a shift from elementary to middle elementary school; a focus on underserved communities and an increase in middle and high school markets. This target has been met one year ahead of plan to student distribution: 1% ahead for middle school and 4% ahead for high school. Earned JA USA's highest national Five Star Award in recognition of JA staff and boards that meet national operational standards for compliance, student impact, operational efficiency, financial stability and sustainability. During the 2014-2015 school year, Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut taught 22,658 students about business, jobs and the importance of education for success. 1,200 business and community volunteers provided JA programs to 20 Connecticut towns in the Greater Bridgeport, Lower Naugatucuk Valley and Greater Danbury service area resulting in: Increased students' understanding of money, the world of work and the importance of education for a successful futureIncreased mentoring relationships provided by caring adults in the communityNew business and education partnerships that create a bridge between the classroom and the workplace.Increased student awareness of local businesses, industries and career opportunities. Program accomplishments include: -The fifth JA Titan High School Business Challenge, a web-based business simulation where students run a virtual company, was held in March 2015 at Fairfield University, Dolan School of Business. Sixteen area high schools participated. Participants from the top two teams each were awarded scholarships. Fifty area businesses sponsored the event.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Financial Education

JA offers a distinct method of empowering youth to own their future economic success. The central theme found across JA's research-based financial literacy, entrepreneurship and work readiness curriculum is that excellence in school leads to success in the real-world. All programs emphasize this school-to-career idea while teaching real-life concepts, such as ethical decision-making, opportunity costs, money management, career preparation and global competition while reinforcing important life skills, such as critical thinking, public speaking, teamwork, problem solving and budgeting. JA's K-12 curriculum is organized into grade-specific elementary, middle and high school programs, and taught by local volunteers from the business community during the regular school day. These volunteers are recruited and trained by JA staff, and their time spent in the classroom is fundamental to our success; they lead activities while sharing their own life experiences, challenge students to think beyond their present circumstances, and reinforce basic skills crucial to succeeding in our modern economic system. All JA programs are FREE to participating schools, volunteers and students.

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Program 2

Financial Education-Ansonia, Derby, Seymour and Shelton Schools

A generous multi-year grant from The Valley Community Foundation will provide vital financial literacy education and life skills programs for nearly 5,000 students in grades K-12 in the lower Naugatuck Valley communities during the 2015-2018 school years.

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

Service Areas

Self-reported

Connecticut

JA of Western Connecticut has had a positive influence for students in the following communities: Bridgeport, Fairfield, Stratford, Trumbull, Bethel, Brookfield, Danbury, Monroe, New Fairfield, New Milford, Newtown, Wilton, Ansonia, Derby, Seymour, and Shelton improving educational outcomes for students from all racial, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds by providing empowering financial literacy, work readiness and entreprenurial programs for over 22,000 students in grades K-12.

Additional Documents

Funding Needs

All programs are provided free of charge to schools and students. Each fiscal year we need to re-raise our organizational budget to deliver existing program and meet requests for program expansion. 1. Volunteers to teach JA programs in grades K-12 in theGreater Bridgeport, Greater Danbury and Lower Naugatuck Valley communities. 2. Funding to support new and existing K-12 programs in the Greater Bridgeport, Greater Danbury and Lower Naugatuck communities.

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Junior Achievement of Western CT Inc
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Ms. Bernadine Venditto

BIO

Bernadine joined Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut in the fall of 2005 as a Program Manager and was promoted to President in July 2008. Under her leadership, the organization has achieved financial stability moving from operational deficits to consistent surpluses while, at the same time, each year increasing the number of students participating in JA programs by 10% and expanding program at the middle and high school levels. One of the new initiatives Bernadine has brought to the organization is the highly successful High School Business Challenge, a mission based fundraising event. Bernadine holds a B.A. in International Trade from Hofstra University.

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

"The past year was a successful one for Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut, donations were up, revenue and participation in our special events increased dramatically and once again we were recognized by Junior Achievement USA as one of its best local organizations in the U.S. In the toughest economic environment in decades, we served even more young people in Connecticut than in the previous year. In fact, 22,658 students participated in our financial education, career development and entrepreneurial programs. JA of Western Connecticut's vision is to be a premier organization, making a positive impact on the lives of all students in our franchised service area by developing habits for long term success and giving them a hand up for their future. Behind each one of these 22,000 young people were many caring and generous adults who donated their time, energy, passion and financial resources. Members of our team included: * More than 1,000 volunteers from corporations and the community who invested countless hours of their time; 1,000 educators at 81 schools in 18 communities. * 150 individuals, foundations and corporations who donated nearly $300,000 last year. * More than 1,000 friends of Junior Achievement who participated in special events that netted nearly $300,000. * 21 members of our board of directors, along with 4 members of our Valley community board, 7 members of our Danbury community board and 8 members of our Bridgeport community boards who are deeply committed to the Junior Achievement mission. * The eight incredibly dedicated and hardworking members of JA's staff. These numbers underscore what helps to make Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut so effective - the powerful partnership between businesses, schools and the community, all focused on empowering students to own their own economic success. Thank you to each volunteer, educator, funder and community leader who invested time and resources in Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut. We invite you to support this remarkable effort which ensures a brighter future for each of our Junior Achievement students - and, as a result, for our community."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Craig Winslow

GE Capital

Term: July 2015 - June 2017

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?