Human Services

Educate the Children, Inc.

  • Ithaca, NY
  • http://www.etc-nepal.org

Mission Statement

Educate the Children works with women and children in Nepal to improve health, welfare, and self-sufficiency by building skills that families can pass down to later generations.  Programs include scholarships for children from very poor families, improvement of school facilities, training of teachers, establishment of kindergartens, sustainable agricultural development, and services for rural women that incorporate literacy- and numeracy-building, health education, and income generation components.

In the aftermath of the severe earthquakes and aftershocks of spring 2015, ETC quickly raised additional funds to support the construction of (1) temporary shelters for hundreds of suddenly homeless families, and (2) temporary classrooms that enabled children to resume their interrupted educations as soon as was reasonably possible. Full and permanent reconstruction will take many years. In the meantime, ETC is committed to ensuring that schools can continue to operate, and that marginalized and impoverished women can build the skills and confidence to enable them to earn higher incomes and grow greater quantities of more nutritious food. Education, income generation, and proper nutrition will all be more important now than ever before, as village residents work to rebuild their devastated communities.

Main Programs

  1. Education Program
  2. Women's Empowerment Program
  3. Agricultural Development Program
  4. Ongoing support for post-quake rebuilding
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

Nepal (focus on Dolakha District of east central Nepal, the epicenter of the 12 May 2015 earthquake)

ruling year

1991

President of the Board

Self-reported

Ms. Elisabeth C. Prentice

Keywords

Self-reported

international development, women's literacy, children's education, Nepal, sustainable agriculture, community development, empowerment, women's rights, microcredit, public health, community development

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EIN

16-1383981

 Number

6049098521

Also Known As

Educate the Children International, ETC

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Single Organization Support (Q11)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

ETC works for multi-year project cycle periods in regions of rural Nepal, serving several contiguous communities at a time through the following activities:

1. We help the local residents improve and expand the capacities of their schools, including the establishment of kindergarten programs and the provision of scholarships for children whose families would not otherwise be able to pay tuition and buy supplies.

2. We help set up women's groups through which participants establish microcredit funds, support each other in the acquisition and application of job and life skills (such as record-keeping and sanitation/disease prevention), and develop a sense of personal empowerment.

3. We provide basic and advanced literacy and numeracy training for women (in some parts of rural Nepal, the literacy rate for adult women is 25% or lower);

4. We provide training and supplies to encourage the development of sustainable agriculture, from personal kitchen gardens to semi-commercial agriculture.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Education Program

The Education Program works to improve access to, and the quality of, rural government schools in Nepal. The program includes: in-kind scholarships, competitive higher education scholarships, establishment of pre-primary education, school facilities improvement, provision of school supplies, teacher training, improved school/community relations, and improved administration.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Budget

$75,000.00

Program 2

Women's Empowerment Program

The Women's Empowerment program is a 5-year process that leads to organized women emerging as community leaders. Activities include: formation of women's groups, establishment of savings and loan funds, literacy training, legal literacy, family health improvement, off-farm income generation, and the creation of cooperatives.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Female Adults

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$46,000.00

Program 3

Agricultural Development Program

The Agricultural Development program works to improve food security and increase incomes for families in rural Nepal. The keystone to the program is working for family food security through the establishment of kitchen gardens on plots controlled by members of the women's groups in the Women's Empowerment Program. With that foundation the program introduces organic soil management techniques, composting, nursery establishment and maintenance, off-season vegetable production, livestock management and improvement, reduction/elimination of agrochemical use, planning and production of commercial agriculture.

Category

Food, Agriculture & Nutrition

Population(s) Served

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Female Adults

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$34,000.00

Program 4

Ongoing support for post-quake rebuilding

ETC will continue to support post-quake rebuilding efforts, especially at schools. Activities will include physical improvements to existing temporary classrooms, for longer-term use; providing replacement school materials and supplies to replace those destroyed in the quakes; and providing health and sanitation supplies and garden/farm seeds to village residents.

Category

International, Foreign Affairs & National Security

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

$150,000.00

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Number of clients who become literate because of literacy education programs by the nonprofit

Target Population
Females, Adults, Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
Women's Empowerment Program
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
ETC conducts literacy training for women during the first two years of each of our multi-year program cycles. 2015 included the first six-month (beginning/basic) training.

2. Average change in income of clients served (in dollars)

Target Population
Females, Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people, Farmers

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Estimated minimum household income increase for women able to sell excess garden produce. Represents 10% or greater increase in household income. Many women did much better.

3. Number of clients served

Target Population
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Estimated minimum number of people directly served (predominantly teachers, farmers, women seeking literacy training, and school-age children and their parents). Indirect # served was appx. 10,000.

4. Number of people trained

Target Population
Adults, Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people, Farmers

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Includes 452 women trained in leadership and financial management skills, 247 participants in several different agricultural trainings, and 109 participants in teacher training workshops

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    ETC's mission is to work with women and children in Nepal to improve health, welfare, and self-sufficiency by building skills that families can pass down to later generations. In order to fulfill this mission, we strive for the following goals:

    1. To ensure that women can become literate and numerate, start their own small businesses, gain personal confidence and social standing, and contribute significantly to their families' well being.

    2. To ensure that children can attend and succeed in school even if their families cannot afford to send them.

    3. To combat malnutrition and food insecurity by helping women farmers produce greater quantities of nutritious food, using low-cost, earth-friendly methods.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    ETC's program staff of 16 Nepalis works intensively in a predefined geographic area for several years, providing training and resources as well as helping local residents develop the leadership skills and confidence that will enable them to manage the activities without external help. With one year remaining in a program cycle, ETC begins to phase out our involvement; by the end of the final year, the programs are fully managed and supported locally.

    Our integrated community development program model includes three mutually reinforcing components:

    1. Women's empowerment: Through their participation in ETC-sponsored women's groups, women become literate, learn basic business skills such as handling money and keeping records, learn to establish their own small businesses to help support their families, and gain a stronger sense of self-worth.

    2. Children's education: ETC covers the costs of fees, uniforms, and supplies for children who would not otherwise be able to attend school. We also improve schools by training teachers; launching kindergarten programs; providing classroom supplies such as educational games, maps, charts, and musical instruments; and making physical improvements to the buildings, including ensuring the availability of clean drinking water.

    3. Sustainable agricultural development: ETC training and resources improve nutrition and increase families' incomes. Agricultural activities include both crop farming and livestock husbandry.

    By involving local residents all along - during the planning, implementation, and evaluation stages of the program cycle - we ensure maximum "buy-in," maximum efficacy during the program cycle, and thus long-term sustainability. We do not seek to "do good" by rushing in to impose an inflexible program model upon an unprepared and possibly unwelcoming group of people. Instead, we go where we are invited, and all along we seek to learn from the residents - i.e., the actual program beneficiaries - what specific needs and challenges their communities face, and we tailor and adjust our programs accordingly.

    Our work reaches across generations to ensure that members of a participating family will never again be illiterate or unable to earn a living.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    ETC has nearly a quarter of a century's experience in providing effective development programs in Nepal. The 16 people who comprise our Nepal staff, led by Ms. Mira Rana (who joined ETC in 1994), possess extensive skills and knowledge in their specific fields (women's empowerment and rights, agriculture, and education) as well as excellent communications skills, knowledge of the culture in which they will be working, and deep commitment to the organization's mission.

    ETC is grateful to acknowledge our supporters in the United States and in nations around the world. Many of our supporters have been involved with ETC for more than 10 years, and some for more than 20 years. They have told us that they support ETC not only because of a belief in the importance and efficacy of our work, but also because they are confident that their donations are used wisely and well.

    ETC is pleased and proud to have enjoyed programmatic partnerships with many other governmental and non-governmental organizations over the years. These include but are not limited to the Advocates for Human Rights (Minnesota); Faselung Social Services; the Resource Management and Rural Empowerment Centre; the Dolakha District Livestock Office; Nepal Netra Jyoti Sangh, a.k.a. the National Society for Comprehensive Eye Care; Nyayik Sansar Nepal, an initiative of the Israeli NGO Tevel b'Tzedik; the Rotary Club of Jawalakhel; and the Dolakha District Biogas Office. (All of these partners are located in Nepal unless otherwise noted.)
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Because our program cycle is of several years' duration, we cannot here list every evaluative indicator that we use. Below are listed some of the more significant indicators:

    1. Ninety percent of literacy class participants (i.e., previously illiterate women) will pass exams at the halfway point and at the end of each of three six-month sessions, indicating that they have gained and continue to improve their literacy skills. These exams will be administered and graded by their class teachers; the entire literacy program is overseen by a committee of ETC personnel, teachers, and local leaders. Literacy is a precondition for the women to be able to start and later expand their own small businesses. It will also help them assess their children's progress in school, because they will be able to review and help with homework and understand the children's progress reports.

    2. During any given program cycle, ETC pays special attention to supporting pre-primary (pre-school and kindergarten) programs, often including establishment of programs at schools where none presently exist. In many cases, this will entail building and furnishing new classrooms and training pre-primary teachers. This enables hundreds of young children per year to benefit from early education, giving them a better chance at academic success in later years, and their older sisters will not have to stay home to care for them. Evaluative tools include official school records and ETC staff members' direct observations and reports.

    3. By the end of a multi-year program cycle, about 90 percent of women's group members have taken out and repaid loans from their women's groups' microcredit funds to start or expand their own small businesses – such as goat or poultry farms, market gardening enterprises, and small retail establishments. The household incomes of participating families will increase by an average of 30% or more as a result of women's entrepreneurial activities. This will enable the women and their families to improve their own and their peers' standard of living in important ways: They will eat more nutritiously, the children will be enrolled in school instead of being kept home due to parents' inability to pay for fees and supplies, and their increased purchasing power will benefit their local economies. Evaluative tools include ETC staff members' direct observations and reports, official records of women's groups (including microcredit loan disbursement and repayment records), and statements from the participating women.

    4. Women and their families are healthier (lower incidence of diarrhea and dysentery, rates of preventable illness, etc.) after having begun to grow nutritious food in their kitchen gardens and participated in health trainings. This leads to children missing fewer days of school. Evaluative tools include data received from local health posts' and schools' records, and reports from the women themselves at monthly women's group meetings.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    In 2009, ETC's long-term results from past program areas were studied by a team of independent evaluators. In general, the findings were very positive, especially as they related to the long-term benefits and sustainability of our work. The evaluators noted many strengths and advantages that ETC possesses, which are not shared by all organizations similar in budget size and programmatic scope. Among these are:

    (1) Effective focus on underserved populations (i.e., the very poor and socially marginalized)
    (2) Effective local resources mobilization and collaboration with local institutions (i.e., leveraging partnerships with and support from other agencies)
    (3) Local ownership (i.e., buy-in and commitment on the part of the program beneficiaries)
    (4) Procedural simplicity
    (5) Strong and regular monitoring
    (6) Synergistic effect in communities served
    (7) Transparency

    Specific achievements from past program cycles have included the following:

    (1) 91% of our literacy class participants have passed their exams, indicating that they have achieved at least basic literacy. Compare this to the national literacy rate among women, which is just over 50% at best and closer to 25% by some estimates.
    (2) Participants have reported an average annual household income gains of $150 to $200 from women's ETC-trained income generating activities (which are usually agriculture in nature, thus serving the dual purpose of providing a family with more nutritious food). This amount represents, for many families, a 50% or greater increase in household income; some particularly successful women report that their household incomes increased by 100% or more.
    (3) Women's status in their communities has improved dramatically due not only to their newfound literacy and financial contributions to their households and local economies, but also to their own much greater self-confidence.
    (4) Every pre-primary (early education) classroom we have launched during earlier program cycles is still in operation.
    (5) Virtually 100% of women's group members in our previous program areas continued to enroll their children in school after ETC left their areas. This occurred because families now have a heightened sense of the value of education and because, due to higher household incomes, they can afford to keep their children in school instead of having to withdraw them.
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

Nepal (focus on Dolakha District of east central Nepal, the epicenter of the 12 May 2015 earthquake)

Social Media

Funding Needs

Restricted and unrestricted support

Videos

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External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

EDUCATE THE CHILDREN, INC.
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Educate the Children, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2015 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Co-Chair
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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President of the Board

Ms. Elisabeth C. Prentice

BIO

Ms. Prentice is a retired non-profit executive and community volunteer. She served two years in the Peace Corps in Nepal.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ms. Elisabeth Prentice

retired non-profit executive

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?