Youth Development

Los Angeles Robotics

  • Manhattan Beach, CA
  • http://larobotics.org/

Mission Statement

The
specific purposes for which this corporation is organized include, but are not
limited to:  (1) Serving the public by
offering fun, technology-based enrichment activities for youth and community
outreach with a focus on robotics programs that are affordable and sustainable
throughout Southern California.  (2) Partnering
with FIRST® LEGO® League (FLL®) to support regional FLL
and Junior FIRST LEGO League (Jr.FLL®) events and the development of FLL and Jr.FLL
teams and volunteers.  (3) Partnering
with FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC®) to support regional FTC events and the development of FTC
teams and volunteers.  (4) Partnering
with FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC®) to support regional FRC events and the
development of FRC teams and volunteers.  (5) Partnering with VEX Robotics Competition
(VRC) to support regional VRC events and the development of VRC teams and
volunteers.  (6) Supporting the
development of volunteers for regional and national events.

Main Programs

  1. Los Angeles Region FIRST LEGO League
  2. Los Angeles FIRST Tech Challenge
  3. Southern California Regional Robotics Forum (SCRRF)
  4. Los Angeles Region Junior FIRST LEGO League

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Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Southern California

ruling year

2005

Principal Officer since 2012

Self-reported

Liberty Naud

Keywords

Self-reported

Los Angeles, Southern California, Robot, FRC, FIRST Robotics Competition, VRC, VEX Robotics Competiiton, FTC, FIRST Tech Challenge, FLL, FIRST LEGO League, Jr.FLL, Junior FIRST LEGO League

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EIN

20-0572530

 Number

0403414345

Physical Address

1457 3rd Street

Manhattan Beach, CA 90266 6335

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Scholarships, Student Financial Aid, Awards (B82)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Supported five programs designed to encourage young people to pursue
careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM): Jr.FLL, FLL, FTC
and SCRRF.  (1) Jr.FLL:  Supported 112 teams involving 500 primary
school students ages 6-9. Organized two events for teams to share their work.  (2) FLL:  Supported 297 teams (up 30% from previous year) involving 2,400 elementary
and middle school students. Organized 16 expositions, 10 coach training
workshops, 10 challenge release workshops, 14 practice tournaments, 10
qualifying tournaments and 2 championship tournaments supported by 1,200 event
volunteers. Provided financial support for 24 teams in economically
disadvantaged schools or communities.  (3)
FTC:  Supported 54 teams involving 500
high school students and 100 adult mentors. Organized two expositions, a
kickoff, a coach training workshop, 5 qualifying events and a championshi200 adult mentors, and 40
event volunteers.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Los Angeles Region FIRST LEGO League

FIRST®
LEGO® League introduces younger students (9-14 years old) to real-world engineering challenges
by building LEGO-based robots to complete tasks on a thematic playing surface.
FLL teams, guided by their imaginations and adult coaches, discover exciting
career possibilities and, through the process, learn to make positive
contributions to society.  Elementary
and middle-school students get to:  (1) Design, build, test and program robots using LEGO MINDSTORMS® technology  (2) Apply real-world math and science concepts (3) Research challenges facing today’s scientists  (4) Learn critical thinking, team-building and presentation skills  (5) Participate in tournaments and celebrations.  What
FLL teams accomplish is nothing short of amazing. It’s fun. It’s exciting. And
the skills they learn will last a lifetime.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Budget

$62,298.00

Program 2

Los Angeles FIRST Tech Challenge

FIRST
Tech Challenge is designed for those who want to compete head to head, using a
sports model. Teams of up to 10 students are responsible for designing, building,
and programming their robots to compete in an alliance format against other
teams. The robot kit is reusable from year-to-year and is programmed using a
variety of languages. Teams, including coaches, mentors and volunteers, are
required to develop strategy and build robots based on sound engineering
principles. Awards are given for the competition as for well as for community
outreach, design, and other real-world accomplishments.  Students
get to: (1) Design, build, and program robots  (2) Apply real-world math and science concepts (3) Develop problem-solving, organizational, and team-building skills (4) Compete and cooperate in alliances and tournaments (5) Earn a place in the World Championship (6) Qualify for nearly $10 million in college scholarships

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

$14,526.00

Program 3

Southern California Regional Robotics Forum (SCRRF)

SCRRF
Supports FIRST® Robotics Competition (FRC®) teams in Southern California. "The
varsity Sport for the Mind," FRC combines the excitement of sport with the
rigors of science and technology. Under strict rules, limited resources, and time
limits, teams of 25 students or more are challenged to raise funds, design a
team "brand," hone teamwork skills, and build and program robots to
perform prescribed tasks against a field of competitors. It’s as close to
"real-world engineering" as a student can get. Volunteer professional
mentors lend their time and talents to guide each team.  Students
get to: (1) Learn from professional engineers (2) Build and compete with a robot of their own design (3) Learn and use sophisticated software and hardware (4) Compete and cooperate in alliances and tournaments (5) Earn a place in the World Championship (6) Qualify for nearly $15 million in college scholarships.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

$5,752.00

Program 4

Los Angeles Region Junior FIRST LEGO League

Focused on building an interest in science and engineering
in children ages 6-9, Junior FIRST® LEGO® League
(Jr.FLL®) is a hands-on program designed to capture young children's
inherent curiosity and direct it toward discovering the possibilities of
improving the world around them. Just like FIRST® LEGO® League
(FLL®), this program features a real-world challenge, to be solved
by research, critical thinking and imagination. Guided by adult coaches and the Jr.FLL Core Values, students work with
LEGO elements and moving parts to build ideas and concepts and present them for
review.Younger elementary school students get to:
- Design and build challenge solutions
using LEGO elements
- Apply real-world math and science
concept
- Research challenges facing today’s
scientists
- Learn team-building and presentation
skills
- Develop Show-Me poster

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

$122.00

Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Southern California

Funding Needs

Funding is needed to start and maintain additional FLL and FTC teams in economically disadvantaged communities.

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Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Los Angeles Robotics

Leadership

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Principal Officer

Liberty Naud

BIO

Liberty Naud is a Veteran of the US Army, a member of the Coalition for Science After School, the President of LA Robotics, Parenting Magazine’s 2012 Mom Congress Delegate for California, a Tournament Director for Jr. FLL, FLL, FTC, and FRC and mentor to many robotics teams in Southern California.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Liberty Naud

SMaRT Education

Term: May 2012 - May 2013

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


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BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?