Youth Development

Enrichment Alliance of Virginia Inc

  • Charlottesville, VA
  • www.enrichva.org

Mission Statement

The Enrichment Alliance of Virginia brings together people, ideas, and resources to enrich the out-of-school time of critically under-served children and youth.

Main Programs

  1. The Enrichment Place
  2. Project Access
Service Areas

Self-reported

Virginia

Charlottesville and Albemarle County and surrounding counties in Central Virginia.

ruling year

2004

Principal Officer since 2005

Self-reported

Mary Anna Dunn

Keywords

Self-reported

enrichment, afterschool, accessible afterschool, inclusive afterschool, inclusion afterschool, children and leisure time, disability and afterschool, rural afterschool, rural enrichment, low-income enrichment, low-income afterschool,

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Also Known As

EAVA

EIN

20-1179901

 Number

1426647807

Physical Address

1106 West Main Street Suite 10

Charlottesville, VA 22903

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

Education N.E.C. (B99)

Other Art, Culture, Humanities Organizations/Services N.E.C. (A99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Through our own
programs and alliances,  we included an estimated 100
children in the arts, sciences, and humanities. This number includes low income and disabled children and refugees. The
actual impact on children is much broader, due to the number of individuals we
have trained in inclusion this year. In total, during the 2008-2009 fiscal year, The Enrichment
Alliance of Virginia provided exposure to, support for, and training in the
inclusion of special needs children and English Language Learners to an
estimated 94 people. At
our spring training alone, the minimum number of children served by the
programs attending was 130.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

The Enrichment Place

The Enrichment Place directly serves up to eight children per session by providing a variety of enriching programmed and supervised unprogrammed activities. We regularly include special needs children and refugees. These children are supported through Project Access, described below. Through Project Access we bring in occupational therapists, trained volunteers, and accessible materials in order to support and encourage these children as they explore creative activities and the arts and sciences, and develop healthy lifestyles.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Mentally/Emotionally Disabled

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$3,000.00

Program 2

Project Access

Project
Access provides children with disabilities opportunities to participate in
enriching, safe, and meaningful activities during out of school hours. We do this by: 

Training
enrichment program staff and volunteers to support and accommodate children
with disabilities.

Piloting
afterschool and summer inclusion programs.

Increasing
exposure to and understanding of children with special needs among afterschool
and summer enrichment communities.

Working
collaboratively with other community organizations who share our goals.

 Helping
connect professionals such as occupational therapists and special educational
teachers with enrichment programs for the purposes of direct services and
consultations.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

$9,000.00

Service Areas

Self-reported

Virginia

Charlottesville and Albemarle County and surrounding counties in Central Virginia.

Funding Needs

During the academic year, volunteer support is sufficient to meet the needs of children who require mentors to be successfully included in after school activities. However, because summer programs typically run daily for a week or more at a time volunteers are not available to support these children. Funding is needed to pay mentors to assist special needs children so that their summer days can be spend productively engaged in meaningful learning and social experiences. We will need to move out of our building, which we rent for a nominal fee, when it is torn down in the next year or so. We will need to be able to pay rent at market value. Scholarships are needed to support the continued inclusion of low income children in our own programs and in programs we collaborate with.

Affiliations + Memberships

Afterschool Alliance

photos




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Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Enrichment Alliance of Virginia Inc

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2009 and 2008
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Mary Anna Dunn

BIO

Mary Anna Dunn is the founder and program director of The Enrichment Alliance of Virginia, which she has served for the past six years.  Dr. Dunn has been in the field of education for 25 years. She holds a Doctorate of Education in Curriculum and Instruction from The Curry School of Education at The University of Virginia.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Hong Fan Bloom

Wells Fargon

Term: June 2010 - May 2011

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?