Animal related

WOODSTOCK FARM ANIMAL SANCTUARY INC

  • High Falls, NY
  • http://woodstocksanctuary.org

Mission Statement

Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary is a 501(c)3 charitable organization with a mission to educate the public about the mistreatment of animals in animal agriculture. Our shelter takes in farmed animals rescued from cases of abuse, neglect and abandonment. It is a place where children and adults can come face to face with the animals who most only know as “dinner" and learn about the devastating effects of modern-day agribusiness on the animals, the environment and human health.

Main Programs

  1. Inner City Youth Farm Visits
  2. Farm Visits Every Weekend
  3. Traveling Humane Education Team
  4. Shelter Caregiving

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

2005

chief executive

Mr. Doug Abel

Self-reported by organization

co-chief executive

Jenny Brown

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

vegan, farm, animal, welfare, shelter, rights, rescue, sanctuary, vegetarian, cow, pig, chicken, duck, sheep, lamb, goat

Self-reported by organization

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012.
Register now

EIN

20-1552990

Also Known As

Woodstock Farm Sanctuary

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Nestled in the Hudson Valley region of NY, Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary provides shelter to cows, pigs, chickens, turkeys, ducks, sheep, goats, and rabbits who have been rescued from cases of abuse, neglect and abandonment.

We are a place where visitors can come face to face with the animals they may only know as dinner and learn about the devastating effects of modern-day agribusiness on the animals, the environment and human health. Here you can frolic with goats in a large open pasture, sit down with a pig who wants nothing more than a belly rub, cuddle with chickens who seek out your attention or get nuzzled by some very friendly sheep!

At the heart of our mission is the hands-on work of rescuing, rehabilitating and caring for farmed animal refugees — as well as educating the public about the typically horrific treatment of animals who are raised for food.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Inner City Youth Farm Visits

This program allows groups of urban kids who've never been in a rural area, let alone met a farm animal, travel up spend a day at our farm and learn how modern factory farming works.

Category

Animal-Related

Budget

$20,000.00

Population Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Program 2

Farm Visits Every Weekend

During our open season, April through October, we are open for farm tours.  Visitors learn in detail about the plight of animals in the factory farming system while making connections with the "ambassadors" who've managed to escape it.

Category

Animal-Related

Budget

$25,000.00

Population Served

Adults

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program 3

Traveling Humane Education Team

We take the farm on the road to schools in major urban areas like NYC pull back the curtain to the hidden world of modern animal agriculture.

Category

Animal-Related

Budget

$12,000.00

Population Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Program 4

Shelter Caregiving

The main shelter operations for over 200 rescued farm animals, including feeding, cleaning, rehabilitation, ongoing medical treatments, etc.

Category

Animal-Related

Budget

$300,000.00

Population Served

Adults

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Self-reported by organization

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary (WFAS) has a twofold mission: to rescue and care for farm animals from cases of abuse, neglect and abandonment, and to educate the public about the effects of industrialized animal agriculture on our health, the planet and of course the animals. The Sanctuary has opened in a new, larger location in High Falls, New York, and our residents include pigs, cows, chickens, turkeys, goats, llamas, sheep, rabbits, ducks and geese. It is a place of compassion and empathy, where children and adults come face-to-face, often for the first time, with animals for food.

    In 2016 and beyond, we aim to increase our impact via our larger facility and increased ability to save more animals from cruelty, abuse and neglect. We will also aim to have school tours where young children will be able to learn about what eating meat results in and how our organization is helping to save the animals. In addition, we are aiming to have retreats for organizations looking for a peaceful environment and a betterment for themselves and others.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    WFAS is one of the leading farm animal sanctuaries in the United States. We have helped rescue and relocate thousands of animals and are currently home to over 350 rescues. A significant number of our residents have severe medical conditions because of past mistreatment, neglect or the reckless way that they were bred—genetically altered to grow faster or to produce much more milk or eggs than they naturally would. At the sanctuary, animals who have only known fear and suffering now enjoy warm, clean barns, nourishing food, and care.

    In the spring of 2006 we officially opened our doors to the visiting public and the Sanctuary quickly became a popular destination for local residents and tourists alike. Currently we moved to a larger facility in High Falls, NY. Our visitors and volunteers meet the animal “ambassadors" and learn about the billions of animals who are being born, living, and dying on factory farms. The bucolic images of green pastures and picturesque barnyard scenes as depicted in ad campaigns do not reveal the reality of today's farming practices. On today's factory farms, animals are crammed by the thousands into filthy, windowless sheds and confined to wire cages, gestation crates, barren dirt lots, and other cruel confinement systems. Most won't feel the sun on their backs or breathe fresh air until the day they are loaded onto trucks bound for slaughter. We are able to teach visitors about the truth of where their food comes from in a environment where they are meeting the animals themselves.

    The tours allow people to interact with animals and get to know them as individuals. With our proximity to New York City, many urbanite visitors who would otherwise never cross paths with these animals now have that chance.

    In addition to the tours, we conduct education and outreach program on and off site—including humane education workshops, group presentations, and additional outreach opportunities like our popular “Blessing of the Animals" and “ThanksLiving" events. We use news media to promote veganism and compassion and to teach those who can not visit the Sanctuary. We are going to continue to use and maximize this strategy to save more animals.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Founded in 2004 on 23 acres of land with empty, unfenced pasture, the Sanctuary has grown to over 120 acres with more and larger buildings – including separate barns for goats/sheep, cows, pigs, and a medical barn for the sickly that need care. We also have pond/habitats for ducks and geese, and a building that features office space for our administrative staff who ensure our mission can continue.

    WFAS has an active and engaged board and a staff of 19 FT staff that include the two founders, Jenny Brown and Doug Abel.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    WFAS has over 212,000 social media followers on Facebook and over 11,000 follwers on Twitter. Every year, total revenue increases as does the number of visitors and volunteers. Name recognition also increased after a story about WFAS in the New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/01/nyregion/01goat.html) and Jenny Brown's memoir, The Lucky Ones: My Passionate Fight for Farm Animals, which was published in 2012 and has brought many new constituents to WFAS while promoting the mission through media programs such as the Diane Rehm Show. Our move allowed us to have a "grand re-opening" event in September, 2015 which brought in thousands of visitors and further highlighted our work and mission.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    WFAS impact is measured by visitors, volunteers, social media impact, and animals saved. We also try to find homes for animals who can't come to the Sanctuary which helps promote rescue and veganism. Our goals and strategies are aimed to continue to increase that impact and spread our mission of compassion. Recently, we were part of an emergency rescue of over 100 animals from a private farm where the animals were extremely neglected and living in their own feces. This rescue allowed us to save a mother pig and her 5 baby piglets, goats, sheep, and chickens.

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

Social Media

@https://www.facebook.com/WoodstockFarm

@https://twitter.com/WoodstockFarm

@http:/youtube.com/woodstocksanctuary

@http://www.pinterest.com/WoodstockFarm/

@http://instagram.com/woodstocksanctuary

Funding Needs

General operating funds are our greatest need, our annual budget is over $500,000.

Videos

photos


External Reviews

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits
Source: greatnonprofits.org

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

WOODSTOCK FARM ANIMAL SANCTUARY INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

WOODSTOCK FARM ANIMAL SANCTUARY INC

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Mr. Doug Abel

co-chief executive

Jenny Brown

BIO

Doug was a film editor . Doug played a key role in editing the Academy Award award-winning documentary The Fog of War. Other recent credits of Doug's include Metallica: Some Kind of Monster, NBC's TV series 30 Rock, and Louis CK's show Louie.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Douglas Abel

No Affiliation

Term: Jan 2010 - Dec 2014

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?