Arts, Culture, and Humanities

CLARION FOUNDATION

  • Menlo Park, CA
  • http://www.theclarionfoundation.org

Mission Statement

The two-fold mission of the Clarion Foundation is to support the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers' Workshop and to promote the understanding that the literature of speculative fiction benefits our society in ways many have not considered.  The Mission of the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers' Workshop is to identify new writers of speculative fiction with the talent and drive to make a significant contribution to the great conversation that is literature, and to provide them the time, space and mentoring needed to foster that contribution.

Main Programs

  1. Clarion Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers' Workshop

Sign in or create an account to view revenue data

Service Areas

Self-reported

International

We provide scholarships to Clarion Writers' Workshop participants from around the world.

ruling year

2005

Principal Officer since 2008

Self-reported

Karen Fowler

Keywords

Self-reported

writing, workshop, science fiction, fantasy, scholarships

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013.
Register now

Also Known As

The Clarion Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers' Workshop

EIN

20-3114945

 Number

6072604965

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (A12)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (B12)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The annual Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers' Workshop provides an intensive six-week, short-story workshopping experience for 18-20 students, taught by six major figures in these literary genres.

Each summer, four instructors, teaching weeks one through four, teach the students in their individual styles under a critiquing process that has been vetted through 40 years of experience.  Each student produces one story a week, which is critiqued by the entire group as well as the instructor, and each student has a one-on-one session with the instructor to discuss their personal strengths and weaknesses as a writer. 

Weeks 5 and 6 follow the same pattern, except that they are co-taught by two instructors, allowing the students to begin assimilating the lessons they have learned and planning for their future as writers.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Clarion Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers' Workshop

The annual Clarion
Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers' Workshop provides an intensive six-week,
short-story workshopping experience for 18 students, taught by six major
figures in the science fiction and fantasy literary genres.

Each summer, four
instructors, teaching weeks one through four, teach the students in their
individual styles under a critiquing process that has been vetted through 40
years of experience. Each student
produces one story a week, which is critiqued by the entire group as well as
the instructor, and each student has a one-on-one session with the instructor
to discuss their personal strengths and weaknesses as a writer. Weeks 5 and 6 follow the same pattern,
except that they are co-taught by two instructors, allowing the students to
begin assimilating the lessons they have learned and planning for their futures
as writers.

The workshop takes place on the campus of the
University of California, San Diego. Students live full-time in UCSD dormitories for the entire six
weeks. During the same period, we
organize public readings for each of the six instructor/artists at the
Mysterious Galaxy Bookstore in San Diego, a well-known location for genre
afficianados. We also organize one
public lecture, bringing together one instructor/artist and one or more UCSD
faculty researchers working in cutting-edge science.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

Adults

Budget

$100,000.00

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Amount of money available for scholarships and instructor fees

Target Population
General/Unspecified

Connected to a Program?
Clarion Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers' Workshop
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
For these three years, all money shown was used for scholarships. No instructor fees were paid.

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Our over-arching goal moving forward is to raise an endowment that will make our program self-supporting.

    Annually, our top goal is to raise enough scholarship money so that every student who is accepted to the Clarion workshop can afford to attend.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    We work with a number of other organizations and individuals who contribute funds for specific scholarships. For example, we work with the Carl Brandon Society to obtain funds for the annual Octavia Butler Clarion Scholarship.

    Clarion alumni conduct various fundraisers with proceeds going toward Clarion scholarships. For example, the annual "Awkward Robots" anthologies compiled, published and sold by the Clarion Class of 2012.

    We conduct our own annual fundraiser, the "Clarion Write-a-Thon," working on the same basic principal as a walk-a-thon. Participants set goals and get pledges for completed written work. Pledges are contributed to the Clarion Foundation.

    We apply to various agencies and foundations for grants annually.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Our staff is entirely composed of volunteers, and fundraising is only one part of our mission. We also provide logistical support for the Clarion Workshop, working closely with UCSD and the Clarke Center for Human Imagination to make sure the workshop goes smoothly each year.

    Our board member, James T. Shea, a professional development officer, spends most of his volunteer time writing grants for us. Other board members use their contacts to build relationships with donors and foundations.

    Board member Charles Justin Whitney lends his web design and engineering skills to development of the Write-a-Thon web site. The site is critical to the success of that fundraiser. Trustee Nancy Etchemendy works closely with him on design and implementation issues.

    We have a crew of volunteers who help with various jobs. Most are Clarion alumni.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Our progress correlates directly with the growth of our liquid financial assets.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    We received a donation of $100,000 after the end of fiscal year 2014 which is to be used as the foundation of an endowment. We still have substantial work to do if we are to grow the endowment to the $500,000 needed to make the Clarion Workshop self-supporting.
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

We provide scholarships to Clarion Writers' Workshop participants from around the world.

Funding Needs

Due to the fact that most donations come in earmarked for scholarships, our primary funding need at present is for operating costs. Since we have no paid employees, these costs are minimal. Last year they totaled about $4,800. Half of that is for liability insurance for the Foundation's officers and trustees. When we are able, we contribute toward the payment of fees for instructors at the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers' Workshop at UCSD. There are six instructors during the workshop, and currently they are each paid between $2,000 and $3,000, depending on whether they are part of the team that teaches during the final week. Depending on budget constraints at UCSD, our contribution toward teaching fees is sometimes crucial to the workshop. Normally, we're unable to contribute unless we receive a grant or other extra income.

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Sign in or create an account to view assets data

Sign in or create an account to view this information

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

CLARION FOUNDATION

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Principal Officer

Karen Fowler

BIO

Karen Joy Fowler is the author of four novels and two short story collections. The Jane Austen Book Club spent thirteen weeks on the New York Times bestsellers list and was a New York Times Notable Book. Fowler's previous novel, Sister Noon, was a finalist for the 2001 PEN/Faulkner Award for fiction. Her debut novel, Sarah Canary, was a New York Times Notable Book, as was her second novel, The Sweetheart Season. In addition,Sarah Canary won the Commonwealth medal for best first novel by a Californian, and was short-listed for the Irish Times International Fiction Prize as well as the Bay Area Book Reviewers Prize. Fowler's short story collection Black Glass won the World Fantasy Award in 1999. She lives in Santa Cruz, California.Karen holds an M.A. in political science from UC Berkeley. She has taught at the Clarion workshop multiple times, and has served on the Clarion Foundation board since its inception.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Karen Joy Fowler

No Affiliation

Term: July 2008 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

No

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

No

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?