International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security

Mayan Families

  • Santee, CA
  • www.mayanfamilies.org

Mission Statement

Mayan Families provides opportunities and assistance to the indigenous and impoverished people of Guatemala, through education and community development programs.

Main Programs

  1. Student Sponsorship
  2. Preschool Nutrition Centers

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

Areas Served Narrative

Mayan Families is based in Panajachel, Department, Solola, Guatemala and works with indigenous families, focusing on programs and services for impoverished women, men, children and the elderly. Services are offered in numerous indigenous languages as well as Spanish. Programs and services include elementary, middle and high school sponsorships, emergency food, clothing and medical services, veterinary services for stray dogs and cats, free preschools, community centers and feeding programs for the elderly.

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

2007

President

Mr. Dwight Poage

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

Guatemala, Mayan, Indigineous, Maya, Lake Atitlan, Panajachel, Chichicastenengo, San Jorge la Laguna, Tierra Linda, San Antonio Palopo, San Andres, Santa Catarina, International, Student Sponsorship, Micro Finance, Micro Loans, Chickens, Medical, Dental, Animal, Animal Welfare, Hope for the Animals, Dental, Vision, Veterinarian, Americas, Central America, Animal Welfare, Student Sponsorhsips, Volunteer, Spanish, Water Filters, Environmental Issues

Self-reported by organization

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2014, 2014 and 2013.
Register now

EIN

20-8433997

 Number

1935346966

Physical Address

2609 Hartford St.

San Diego, CA 92110 2315

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Education Programs. School Scholarships- In 2008 Mayan Families assisted over 800 students to access primary/secondary and post secondary education, and in 2013 we have grown to over 2,500 plus sponsored students! The Microfinance - MicroCredit Project- Over 320 Microcredit packages distributed enabling many indigenous women the opportunity to develop local home based business.The Panajachel Sewing Project- hundreds of adult female students have completed the Mayan Families 3 month Sewing Skills Course. Many of these students have developed home based businesses with their new skills.Construction Programs: Numerous Homes have been built, repairs made, special needs work completed such as wheel chair ramps etc.Classroom Construction: Mayan Families have facilitated the construction and improvement of numerous classrooms in rural impoverished villages to create a better learning environment.                                                                                  

Community Centers: Mayan families have lead and facilitated the construction of 2 rural community centers. In 2009 these community centers will house various Mayan Families Programs - such as sewing classes for women, after school program, medical and veterinary clinics, early learning center, feeding program, adult education, and library and internet access.The Onil Stove Project- Over 1,000 stoves distributed in Panajachel & Lake Atitlan area enabling thousands of adults and children to live in safe smokeless houses.The Rotary Filter Project- 3,000 filters distributed in Panajachel & Lake Atitlan area providing approximately 16,000 with clean drinking water.This is only a partial list of the numerous major accomplishments of Mayan Families over the years.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Student Sponsorship

Guatemala has one of the highest illiteracy and lowest school enrollment rates in Latin America,
primarily due to the high cost of attending school which prevents many indigenous families from receiving an education.

We strongly believe that a good education is the key to breaking the cycle of poverty and can create a better future for children and their families.
That is why we promote education in each of the communities by facilitating sponsorships for thousands of students who otherwise would not have a chance to attend. When we invite you to sponsor a student, we are inviting you to invest in the future of Guatemala, one child at a time.

Student Sponsorship:
The cost of education is prohibitively expensive for many families;

Receiving an education is one of the most significant ways children can improve the standard of living for their families.

Sponsorship Details
Over 3,000 students were sponsored in 2015 to attend school and more than 3,000 for 2016.  These children would not have had the opportunity to go to school without a sponsor.

To become a sponsor please go to Sponsor a Student please go to this link
https://mayanfamilies.org/donate/index/Elementary

Student Sponsorship through Mayan Families provides a student with:

enrollment fee,
school uniform,
backpack,
school supplies,
school shoes and sports shoes,
t-shirt and shorts for gym.

In special cases help could be provided for projects, summer school classes, a musical instrument, and arts and crafts supplies.   

Sponsorship Fees for 2016
Preschool through 12th grade per year: $360 per year per student, which is less than $1.00 a day!

   UNIVERSITY  is $1,350 per year.


Sponsorship Dates

In Guatemala the school year runs from January through October. We accept support for school sponsorship throughout the year.    

Sponsorship Program:

The Mayan Families Student Sponsorship Program was established in loving memory of Dr. Bettyjane Poage and the many other amazing Teachers who have touched our lives!

Category

Education

Budget

$809,334.00

Population Served

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- Other Specified Group

Females, all ages or age unspecified

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program 2

Preschool Nutrition Centers

We are proud to run five Preschool Nutrition Centers in the Lake Atitlán region. These centers give hundreds of children from the some of the most impoverished families the chance to start their education as early as possible, and to receive critical nutritional assistance so they can grow up healthy and strong. At no cost to our students or their families, Mayan Families’ Preschool Nutrition Centers are the best possible investment in the lives of indigenous children; setting them up for success from the very start and giving them a better chance to break out of the cycle of poverty.

Category

Education

Budget

Population Served

Infants/Babies (under age 5)

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- Other Specified Group

Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

Self-reported by organization

1. Number of program participants who receive a secondary school diploma or GED

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years), Indigenous people

Connected to a Program?
Student Sponsorship
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Through our support, 65 students achieved their high school diploma this year! An incredible feat, considering that the average years of schooling for indigenous youth is 3.5 years.

2. Number of children who have emerging literacy skills such as beginning letter recognition and phonological awareness, story comprehension, and use of writing materials.

Target Population
Infants to preschool (under age 5), Indigenous people

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
In 2015, Mayan Families operated 7 Preschool Nutrition Centers and 450 indigenous children attended and obtained early numeracy and literacy skills.

3. Number of students enrolled

Target Population
Females, Males, Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
Student Sponsorship
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
These students were provided with the tools to succeed in education, from preschool to university, through school enrollment, supplies, primary health care and close monitoring by a social worker.

4. Number of family members participating in school activities

Target Population
Adults, Parents, Indigenous people

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
In our Preschool Nutrition Centers, families participate in educational workshops on topics like: study support, health and nutrition.

5. Number of clients who complete job skills training

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years), Indigenous people, Minorities

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
In 2015, 333 young men and women learned new skills in our vocational schools! These schools empower indigenous youth with skills in sewing, carpentry, welding and beauty.

6. Number of loans issued

Target Population
Females, Indigenous people, People of Latin American descent

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Our micro-finance program empowered 344 indigenous Maya women through the distribution of microloans and creation of micro-enterprises in various areas including textiles, small stores, food vending.

7. Number of children with disabilities receiving early intervention services

Target Population
Indigenous people, People with intellectual disabilities, People with physical disabilities

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Mayan Families provides children with special needs with access to quality health care, nutrition and social support to ensure optimal development.

8. Number of students receiving information on HIV/AIDS and STDs

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years), Indigenous people

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
In our Ojos Abiertos program, 558 Maya female and male youth participated in educational workshops on sexual and reproductive health.

9. Number of clients served

Target Population
Indigenous people, Minorities

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Mayan Families provides access to education, food security and nutrition, healthcare and shelter to approximately 10 000 indigenous children, youth, adults and elderly in the Lake Atitlan region.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Self-reported by organization

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Some of our Goals for 2013 are:

    Continuing to assist the impoverished Children, Women and Families in rural Guatemala through support with education costs and resources necessary to attend school, with a special focus on empowering those most disadvantaged or at risk--female students and single-parent families--through our student sponsorship program, which currently includes over 2,000 students.
    Continue to develop community empowerment programs within the various Education Centers we have. Planned programs include after hours school support, quarterly medical clinics, a computer skills program, health and nutrition education.
    Protect and preserve the local ecosystem. Environmental education and awareness through further distribution of sustainable fuel-efficient stoves, water filters and education projects here in Guatemala.
    Continue to host and facilitate visiting medical teams, specialized surgical teams, dental teams, vision teams and veterinary teams, enabling access to health education and treatment.
    Construction of local village education centers, schools and homes to support and strengthen the indigenous communities.
    Build and equip our New Trade Schools in Panajachel and San Andres. Grow our computer labs and sewing classes to include more villages.
    Spay and neuter hundreds, possibly thousands of animals this year through our Hope for the Animals program.
    Continue to grow the Mayan Families Micro Loans Program and empower women to build and grow their own small businesses.
    Build and grow our sustainable projects throughout the year.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    We are Fundraising and getting Sponsors for over 2,500 students through our web site and Social Networking.
    Help form Indigenous Women's groups to assist us in getting the needs of the village met through Micro-credit and other programs that the Women's group indicated they want.
    Install household portable Water Filters to improve overall access to clean potable drinking water.
    Install Onil Fuel Efficient stoves that reduce deforestation by 70% over open pit 3 rock cook fires.

    Coordinate and promote on our web site and through University contacts medical teams, specialized surgical teams, dental teams, vision teams and veterinary teams, enabling access to health education and treatment.

    Construction of local village education centers, schools and homes to support and strengthen the indigenous communities.
    Rotary helped us equip the Trade School here in Panajachel.
    We are actively looking for funding and or grants to support our Monthly Spay and Neuter clinic, also through Social Networking using Facebook.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Thanks to a very generous gift from an Anonymous donor we now have a permanent Building in Guatemala from which to work from and organize our various projects. It has 60 rooms for storage, office space and class rooms as well as emergency housing. Over 80% of our staff is Indigenous Mayan and speak both Kaqchikel and Quiche. Our staff has decade of experience working in Guatemala.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    We measure heights and weights of the over 400 plus children ages three to five years of age, at the seven Pre-school - feeding program that Mayan Families operates in rural Guatemala. We use this data to target the most at risk and malnourished children.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    We have seen the impact in thousands of children who have benefited from the nutrition program with increase in body mass, weight, musculature and increased height. They oral health has improved also with fewer having rotten teeth, oral hygiene issues etc.The public schools administrators and teachers have noted how are students are so much better at scholastic activities that there peers in the same age groups and grades.

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

Areas Served Narrative

Mayan Families is based in Panajachel, Department, Solola, Guatemala and works with indigenous families, focusing on programs and services for impoverished women, men, children and the elderly. Services are offered in numerous indigenous languages as well as Spanish. Programs and services include elementary, middle and high school sponsorships, emergency food, clothing and medical services, veterinary services for stray dogs and cats, free preschools, community centers and feeding programs for the elderly.

Self-reported by organization

Blog

The organization's Blog

Social Media

@mayanfamilies.org

@mayanfamilies

@u/0/b/102949977950285630714/102949977950285630714/posts

@3203028?trk=tyah

@mayanfamiliesvideo

@mayanfamilies/pins/

@mayanfamilies

Funding Needs

We are looking for Grants for our Student Sponsorship Program that currently helps over 2,400 impoverished students go to school each year. These are children, that without this program, would not be attending school.

photos




External Reviews

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits
Source: greatnonprofits.org

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

MAYAN FAMILIES
Fiscal year: Oct 01-Sep 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Mayan Families

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

President

Mr. Dwight Poage

STATEMENT FROM THE President

"Mayan Families is a unique organization that gets projects accomplished. We offer a diverse selection of programs because we believe in the 360 degree approach to helping families get a hand up in life through education, clean potable water, environmental issues, construction, animal welfare and more."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Bryan Bagnas

No Affiliation

Term: Oct 2010 - Sept 2013

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?