Educational Institutions

Catholic Schools Foundation Inc.

  • Boston, MA
  • www.csfboston.org

Mission Statement

The Catholic Schools Foundation changes lives by providing families with demonstrated financial need an opportunity to give their sons and daughters a quality education, focused on Christian values and character formation at Catholic Schools located throughout the Archdiocese of Boston, regardless of race, religion, ethnicity or gender.

Main Programs

  1. CSF Scholars Programd
  2. CSF Counseling Program
  3. Engineering is Elementary
Service Areas

Self-reported

Massachusetts

Archdiocese of Boston

ruling year

1984

Principal Officer since 2006

Self-reported

Mr. Michael Reardon

Keywords

Self-reported

Scholarship Catholic Boston CSF ICSF Back to School Cup

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Also Known As

Inner-City Scholarship Fund

EIN

22-2485502

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Accomplishments in the Last Five Years * Over 5000 students receiving scholarship support annually * Over 3500 students receiving direct support to address non-academic barriers to learning * Over 110 teachers trained integrating technology into the curriculum through a partnership with Boston College * Over $600,000 raised in Matching Gifts by schools through CSF Challenge Grants * 259 Hispanic students enrolled in Catholic schools through the Hispanic Recruitment Initiative Current Goals for the Fiscal Year * Implement student tracking system to demonstrate long-term outcomes * Increase number of scholarship recipients * Enhance application process to focus on academic, financial and governance metrics * Develop programs to address issues relative to performance in the above areas * Develop programs to assist schools with fundraising and marketing

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

CSF Scholars Programd

The Catholic Schools Foundation (CSF) Scholars program was established in 2011 to more directly connect high school students who receive CSF funds to CSF and its donors. CSF Scholars are selected by Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese of Boston upon their acceptance to the school. Students must have a demonstrated financial need, a passing grade point average (GPA), and good conduct. In order to keep the pipeline between Catholic elementary and high schools alive, preference for selection as a CSF Scholar is given to students coming from Catholic elementary schools. In addition, in the spirit of the original mission of Catholic education preference is also given to students who are new immigrants to the United States. Students are awarded a scholarship equal to 30% of their tuition, and are guaranteed this scholarship fortheir entire four years of high school provided they remain enrolled in their current high school; maintain their financial need, passing GPAs, and good conduct each year; and their families remains up to date on their portion of the tuition,The Class of 2015 just completed their ninth grade year at 30 Catholic high schools throughout the Archdiocese. On Thursday May 3, 2012 at a Mass at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross celebrated by Cardinal Cardinal Sean O'Malley, over 170 students in the Class of 2016 were welcomed as the new class of CSF Scholars. This brings the total number of students in both classes to over 340. In speaking of her newest CSF Scholars, Mary Ellen Barnes, the Head of School at Fontbonne Academy in Milton said, ""The CSF Scholars program has been a huge benefit to Fontbonne and these students. Truly, without the funding from this program these young women would not have been able to enroll at our school.""

Category

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$931,330.00

Program 2

CSF Counseling Program

This Program provides schools with a nationally-recognized program housed at Boston College that connects at-risk children with a set of prevention, intervention, and enrichment services to provide for the social, emotional, and spiritual needs of young people. The City Connects Counseling Program provides 3,776 students in 11 Boston Catholic schools with the resources they need to succeed inside and outside of the classroom.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

Program 3

Engineering is Elementary

Engineering is Elementary (EiE) is a rigorously researched, classroom–tested curriculum that increases students’ interest in and confidence about engineering. EiE is designed to encourage all children—including those from underrepresented groups—to envision themselves as potential engineers. Developed in conjuncture with scientists, this is a high quality program that meets national as well as Massachusetts state standards. This Program partners with the Museum of Science (MOS) to open doors to new experiences beyond the classroom. Investments to this Program can provide schools with the MOS award-winning Engineering is Elementary curriculum

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Through our signature program, the Inner-City Scholarship Fund (ICSF), CSF assists families who wish to send their children to a Catholic school but are unable to afford tuition, with a goal of never having a student choose another school because of financial considerations. CSF guarantees all funding at the same level for students who are currently scholarship recipients in grades K-8, this ensures that these students receive scholarships from kindergarten through grade eight (pending qualification). Our long-term goal is to establish a scholarship continuum from grades K-12. We are also working to increase the number of scholarships distributed and to better target low-income students to allow them to receive a Catholic education.
    A related goal is to continue to provide program aid to students and schools in the form of counseling, technology, marketing, and Hispanic recruitment initiatives. Our financial support of guidance counselor staffing at Catholic schools in the Boston area has had a major impact on the well-being of students. Our Hispanic recruitment program is aimed at identifying and recruiting children for Catholic schools from Boston-area parishes. Because of its success, the concept has been shared widely and is becoming a national model for other cities. And by supporting technology efforts at our schools, we help to ensure that our students are gaining crucial technological skills that they will carry into the workplace.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    We continue to meet great success as more than $8 million in scholarship funds was awarded to low-income students last year. These scholarships are not merely helpful to the families receiving them, they are essential. During the 2016 campaign year, we anticipate providing approximately $7 million in scholarship support for low-income students.

    Last year, CSF moved to a one to one model whereby students receive a scholarship continuum from PreK-8th grade. This model guarantees funding for these students, alleviating the stress families face each year in not knowing whether or not they can stay in a school because of financial concerns. Because we are better able to track each student as they move through the school system, schools are better able to work with families and students when enrollment or retention issues arise. Together, CSF and the schools can address any problem in a more streamlined and efficient manner through this one to one model and our new tracking system. We believe that this model will help with retention rates as well as provide more opportunities to leverage support for the Inner-City Scholarship Fund.



  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Our Catholic high schools consistently boast a graduation rate above 98 percent. Massachusetts maintains some of the nation's highest SAT scores, but Catholic high school students in the Boston area score even higher year after year on the SAT and Advanced Placement tests than both the Massachusetts public school average and the national average. Last year, our Catholic high school students scored an average of 46 points higher on their SAT tests than their public school peers. With an average student to faculty ratio of 11 to 1, Catholic schools are able to meet the needs of many students who wouldn't thrive in the public schools.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    The following key questions are our criteria for success and guide our evaluations of success:

    Are we raising and distributing a significant amount of money each year to needy students?
    One way to determine the CSF's level of success is to measure the level of funds raised in our annual campaign efforts. By this measure, we continue to meet great success as over $8 million in scholarship funds was awarded to low-income students last year. These scholarships are not merely helpful to the families receiving them, they are essential. During the 2016 campaign year, we anticipate providing over $8 million in scholarship support for low-income students.

    Are we helping our schools to build their own capacity?
    A secondary goal of the CSF is to enable schools to become less financially dependent on CSF. In an effort to promote this independence, CSF offers tools to schools to strengthen their capacity from within with a focus on the Admissions and Development areas. CSF is also holding the schools accountable for attrition and we have strengthened our verification process of scholarship recipients.

    Additionally, CSF encourages and helps coordinate collaborations amongst schools. For example, funding from our committed supporters has allowed CSF to unite eight Catholic schools through a pilot program called the Catholic Schools Lowell Collaborative.
    In the 2014-2015 school year, the Collaborative implemented several initiatives designed to strengthen the continuum of Catholic education in Lowell. The activities also supported the needs of individual schools through a variety of training and capacity-building retreats and workshops. The successfully implemented projects included a joint seventh grade leadership retreat for selected students from each Catholic elementary school, separate eighth grade retreats for all members of each school's eighth grade class, professional development for teachers, and academic tutoring.

    The pilot phase of the Collaborative has had proven results in building community and adding needed resources across all eight schools. Fostering this culture of collaboration and dialogue ensures that all students find success academically, emotionally, and spiritually. The Collaborative is planning to expand upon these initial accomplishments, creating a vibrant presence and sustainable continuum of high-quality Catholic education that is accessible to families in Lowell.

    Are the scholarship recipients succeeding in school?
    Our Catholic high schools consistently boast a graduation rate above 98 percent. Massachusetts maintains some of the nation's highest SAT scores, but Catholic high school students in the Boston area score even higher year after year on the SAT and Advanced Placement tests than both the Massachusetts public school average and the national average. Last year, our Catholic high school students scored an average of 46 points higher on their SAT tests than their public school peers. With an
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Over the past year or so we have implemented a scholarship continuum for grades pre-k through 8. We are looking to do the same for pre-K through 12.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Massachusetts

Archdiocese of Boston

Funding Needs

1. Implementation of student tracking system - $25,000 This will better demonstrate student progress and outcomes to help determine how to focus funding. 2. Expansion of the Hispanic Recruitment program to serve more of this at-risk population - $250,000 25% of Hispanic students in MA don't finish high school. If we can get these students into Catholic schools we know that we can better their educational outcomes and provide them a solid foundation. 3. Implementation of the Catholic Schools Admissions Collaborative - $150,000 Catholic schools run at extremely low cost and therefore most do not have the resources to attract and enroll students. The net effect is that students who most need this opportunity are unaware of it. At the same time, families who could pay the tuition do not think of it as an option. 4. Expansion of the CSF Counseling program- $$100,000 Provides funding for two schools to implement a program that connects at-risk children with a set of prevention, intervention, and enrichment services to provide for the social, emotional, and spiritual needs of young people. 5. Programs to integrate technology into the curriculum - $125,000Technology is only useful if teachers make it part of the curriculum.

Accreditations

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

CATHOLIC SCHOOLS FOUNDATION INC
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Catholic Schools Foundation Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Mr. Michael Reardon

BIO

Prior to joining the Catholic Schools Foundation, Mike Reardon was the Vice President for Institutional Advancement at Boston College High School. As Vice President, he restructured the advancement program, increased annual giving by 60%, launched a $40,000,000 Capital campaign, rebranded organizational print and web collateral, and institutionalized communication and planned giving efforts. He began his career at Canisius High School in Buffalo, NY. After Buffalo, Mike worked as a lecture agent in Washington, DC before making his way back to Boston. He has his BA from Fairfield University.

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

"As the largest school system in Massachusetts outside of the City of Boston, 45,000 young people from all faiths are benefitting each day from a quality education in environments that nurture each child's unique spirit. What goes on in Catholic schools tremendously impacts the outcomes of students and families and shapes their trajectory in life. With over 82% of families supported by the CSF living below the poverty level, you would expect lower educational outcomes, but this is not the case. Our schools boast a 99% high school graduation rate. Years ago these schools were free, staffed by sisters, priests and brothers, today tuition is necessary. Although modest, averaging $3,800 at the elementary level, still out of reach for many families. Our work bridges that gap. Not only is this good for the students and families, but this is good for cities and towns. If Catholic schools were to go away, it would cost tax payers an estimated $500,000,000 in additional taxes each year and overwhelm and already stressed system. In short, Catholic schools work for the students they serve and our community in general. "

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Most Reverend Sean Cardinal O'Malley

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston

Term: July 2003 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?