Youth Development

Leadership Education and Athletics in Partnership

  • New Haven, CT
  • http://www.leapforkids.org

Mission Statement

LEAP's mission is to develop the strengths and talents of young leaders who create and implement year-round, community-based programming designed to achieve positive academic and social outcomes for children and youth living in high-poverty urban neighborhoods who might otherwise be limited by the geography of their birth: neighborhoods with high levels of violence, a massive academic achievement gap for children of color and a lack of high quality entry level jobs to help move families out of poverty. LEAP's vision is that young people can turn inner city neighborhoods around; they can be the solution and not the problem. Our goal is to create and implement a multi-tiered mentoring model where young people of all ages are welcomed, educated and provided opportunities to grow within LEAP.

Main Programs

  1. LEAP Children's Program
  2. LEAP Youth Development Program
  3. LEAP Computer Science: Learning to Code
  4. LEAP Aquatics Program
Service Areas

Self-reported

Connecticut

LEAP serves children from five neighborhoods in New Haven: Church Street South, Fair Haven, Dwight, Dixwell and Farnam Courts. We work closely with community partners including five New Haven Public Schools that provide classroom space: High School in the Community, Clinton Avenue School, Troup School, Hillhouse High School and Conte School. We also operate a comprehensive community center on Jefferson Street in New Haven on the edges of Downtown, Fair Haven and Wooster Square.

ruling year

1994

Principal Officer since 2014

Self-reported

Mr. Henry Fernandez

Keywords

Self-reported

LEAP, children, education, youth, leadership, youth development, academic enrichment, poverty, low income, urban, academic preparation

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EIN

22-2906547

 Number

3133092933

Also Known As

LEAP

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Swimming, Water Recreation (N67)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Accomplishments:We significantly expanded the number of young people served to 500 during the summer and 600 during the academic year. This represents growth of 66% over last year.We expanded the number of days we work with children during the week from 4 to 6 (an increase of 50%) and expanded the number of weeks during the year that we work with children.100% of our junior counselors graduated from high school and were accepted to college. LEAP reopened its pool, allowing hundreds of low income New Haven children the opportunity to learn to swim. LEAP hires and trains local young college and high school students to teach swim classes. This is essential as the CDC reports that 11-12 year old African American children are 10 times more likely to drown in a pool than white kids. LEAP began a new initiative to teach children to learn to write computer code. Elementary and middle school students learn the basics of computer science as well as data structures and algorithms.We began cooking classes (run by high school students in the culinary arts program at Eli Whitney Tech), as well as classes in painting, martial arts, drama and dance.Goals:Over the next two years, our goal is to expand such that over 1000 low income New Haven children are enrolled in LEAP.To expand our swim instruction programs to become open to a larger number of children beyond kids enrolled in LEAP.To make major repairs at the LEAP community center at 31 Jefferson Street in New Haven as the building hits its 100th birthday in 2015. While a grand old building, it needs repairs to lower energy costs, stop leaks and keep the pool operational.To build stronger community support for LEAP through expanding our work with volunteers, ensuring that our new community Halloween party becomes an annual event, using community artists to teach our art classes, and opening our pool for community use.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

LEAP Children's Program

The Children's Program provides children ages 7-12 with academic year, weekend and summer programming to help them develop academically and socially. In the afterschool component that includes weekends, children receive a healthy snack, homework help and instructional resources such as art, dance and science; and enrichment clubs such as computer technology, swimming, healthy cooking, tennis and puppetry are taught at The Roslyn Milstein Meyer LEAP Community Center. In the summer component, the focus is on strengthening the children's reading and writing skills and building social skills. This component features academics in the morning and enrichment activities, including field trips, in the afternoon. Overnight camping and a ropes challenge course for team building are annual summer highlights.

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$1,460,903

Program 2

LEAP Youth Development Program

The Youth Development Program is multi-tiered and targeted to meet the unique developmental needs of this age group.* Leaders-in-Training (13-15) have their own curriculum that recognizes their social and educational needs while preparing them for leadership. LITs build peer mediation/violence prevention skills; learn to problem solve; make good decisions on health/sexuality; PSAT prep.* Junior Counselors (16-19) are high school students who support Senior Counselors in serving LEAP children, thus gaining job experience. JCs receive mentoring and preparation for college, including SAT prep.* Senior Counselors (19-23) are college students gaining work experience, career credentials, and support in their personal, educational, and professional development.With JCs as support, SCs serve LEAP children as teachers, counselors and mentors, creating curricula that maximize their children's learning capacity and broaden the youngsters' worldview. All youth complete community service projects.

Category

Youth Development, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$263,733

Program 3

LEAP Computer Science: Learning to Code

LEAP is again tackling the "digital divide" that exists for inner city children. In 1994 LEAP led the nation in introducing the internet to children living in high poverty urban neighborhoods. Today we remain at the forefront nationally by teaching computer coding to children, primarily of color, ages 7-12, to address the dismal numbers of girls, African-Americans and Latinos taking the AP exam in Computer Science. (20% girls; 3% African-American; 8% Latino). http://bit.ly/1rNvokO Today's software expansion has transformed reading and writing code into a new form of literacy. Preparing children for this technical revolution is crucial for their future and ours. Learning to code however is not simply about equipping the next generation to work as software engineers. Coding is not just a skill; it is an entirely new way to approach problem solving. The broader value in teaching children to code is the way it teaches them to think using a step-by-step logical flow to solve complex problems and build models.

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$29,480.00

Program 4

LEAP Aquatics Program

As part of extending our Healthy Living initiative, LEAP now offers swim instruction 6 days a week. http://bit.ly/1EFU5Bo. Not only is swimming a new skill most of our children would not otherwise learn, it is also a healthy and affordable sport and can be continued throughout life. LEAP teaches swimming because to combat the high drowning rate among African American children, which the CDC reports is 5.5 times times that of their white peers overall and 10 times that for 11-12 year olds. Participation in formal swimming lessons reduces the likelihood of childhood drowning by 88%. Swimming also enhances the mind/body connection through exercise and increased self-esteem, both of which promote stronger school performance. The Community Alliance for Research and Engagement (CARE) found that students with healthier personal practices are more likely to perform better on the Connecticut Mastery Test, a key indicator of whether students meet the academic benchmarks for their age/grade.

Category

Recreation & Sports, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$68,440.00

Service Areas

Self-reported

Connecticut

LEAP serves children from five neighborhoods in New Haven: Church Street South, Fair Haven, Dwight, Dixwell and Farnam Courts. We work closely with community partners including five New Haven Public Schools that provide classroom space: High School in the Community, Clinton Avenue School, Troup School, Hillhouse High School and Conte School. We also operate a comprehensive community center on Jefferson Street in New Haven on the edges of Downtown, Fair Haven and Wooster Square.

Additional Documents

Funding Needs

1. Expand # of children served. Our goal: increase by 100 young people this year at a cost of $100,000.2. College readiness program. We would like to continue to run PSAT prep for freshmen, SAT prep for sophomores and juniors, and to provide a multi-state college tour for juniors and seniors. This will impact 100 New Haven high school students at a cost of $35,000. 3. Swimming program. Our pool needs minor repairs that will total $5000. We want to expand the number of hours the pool is open during the week with a total cost for the school year of $6,000. 4. Professional Development. To run an effective academic and social development program that engages teens and young adults to work with young children, we need to maintain our focus on high quality training for our counselors. Our professional development needs for our counselors are $25,500. Advancing the professional development of our program staff is also a significant priority at a cost of $5,000. 5. Technology. LEAP relies heavily on technology both for teaching our children in our computer learning center and in being able to maintain our evaluation and administrative elements. LEAP needs to upgrade our computers and maintain our high speed internet connection at our community center. This has a cost of $17,500.

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

LEADERSHIP EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS IN PARTNERSHIP INC
Fiscal year: Sep 01-Aug 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Leadership Education and Athletics in Partnership

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
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Principal Officer

Mr. Henry Fernandez

BIO

Current Senior Fellow at the Center for American ProgressCurrent CEO, Fernandez Advisors consulting firm, advising non-profits, government agencies, and companies on management, planning and strategyFormer economic development administrator, City of New HavenMember of the Obama/Biden transition team stationed at the US Dept. of Housing and Urban DevelopmentFormer executive director of LEAPGraduate of Yale Law School

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

" Twenty-three years ago, in my early twenties I was fortunate to join with a group of amazing people to start LEAP in New Haven. I served as executive director for seven years, during a period of amazing growth. Thousands of children came through LEAP, and I met hundreds of teenagers and young adults who served as counselors. Now almost every day in New Haven I run into talented young adults who share with me their current successes and remind me of when we first met that they were in LEAP as an elementary school student. I also hear regularly from former college and high school students who were LEAP counselors and now serve as elected officials, business executives, teachers, principals and heads of non-profit organizations.LEAP builds and nurtures future leaders. It is an amazing institution. When the LEAP Board approached me about once again serving as LEAP's executive director at a time when LEAP planned a mindful expansion, I did not hesitate. I have found the children, teens and young adults just as inspiring as two decades ago. Our focus now is in growing LEAP significantly. We have expanded the number of children served in both our summer program and after school program. We have added a fifth LEAP site at the Farnam Courts public housing development. We have re-opened our pool and are now teaching hundreds of children to swim. We have established a new initiative teaching children the basics of computer programming. We also have increased the number of high school students working for LEAP by 66% with 50 high school junior counselors and another 50 young teens in our Leaders In Training program. We now work with children 6 days a week, up from 4 days a week last year. We still have a lot of work to do. Our goal is to serve 1000 children in the next two years, making high quality academic enrichment and social development programs available for children in New Haven's low income neighborhoods. We want to not only grow but do a better job, ensuring that children have more access to good books in our literacy program, that our counselors are better trained to be mentors and educators, and that we have strong partnerships to expose our children to the arts, overnight camping and other new challenges that expand their understanding of the world. None of this would be possible without the generosity and support of our great donors and volunteers. So thank you for considering supporting LEAP. "

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ann Baker Pepe

The Foote School, Director of Development

Term: Oct 2014 - Oct 2017

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?