Human Services

Project Home

  • Philadelphia, PA
  • www.projecthome.org

Mission Statement

The mission of the Project HOME community is to empower adults, children, and families to break the cycle of homelessness and poverty, to alleviate the underlying causes of poverty, and to enable all of us to attain our fullest potential as individuals and as members of the broader society. We achieve this through a continuum of services comprised of street outreach, a range of supportive housing, and comprehensive services. We address the root causes of homelessness through a multi-pronged neighborhood approach that includes affordable housing, economic development, and environmental enhancement programs, as well as through providing access to employment opportunities, adult and youth education, and free and/or affordable health care.

Main Programs

  1. Program 1
  2. Housing
  3. Opportunities for Employment
  4. Medical Care
  5. Education
Service Areas

Self-reported

Pennsylvania

Project HOME serves all of Philadelphia, PA, with services centering in Lower North Philadelphia, the second poorest ZIP code of our city.

ruling year

1989

President and Executive Director since 1989

Self-reported

Sr. Mary Scullion

Associate Executive Director and Chief Financial Officer since 1989

Self-reported

Joan Dawson McConnon

Keywords

Self-reported

homelessness, community development, youth development,adult education, economic development, advocacy, employment programs

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EIN

23-2555950

 Number

8071950470

Physical Address

1515 Fairmount Ave

Philadelphia, 19130

Also Known As

Project HOME

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Project HOME has a vast array of achievements in all four areas of our focus: Housing, Opportunities for Employment, Medical, and Education. We have leveraged $106 million for housing and economic development; our Employment Services program works with over 200 residents and alumni each year on educational assistance, job search, job coaching, resume writing and budgeting ; we recently opened the nearly 30,000-square-foot Stephen Klein Wellness Center, a Federally Qualified Health Center where Project HOME, Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, and other partners provide community-based, uniquely integrated health and wellness services targeted to the needs of the Lower North Philadelphia Community; and our Honickman Learning Center and Comcast Technology Labs (HLCCTL), a state-of-the-art, 38,000-square-foot technology center in Lower North Philadelphia, provides critical educational and workforce development programs for residents along with neighborhood children and their families—over 1,000 individuals in FY15 alone. Project HOME was recognized by CBS News and The New York Times as a National Model for Ending Homelessness and by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as one of “100 Best Practice" organizations.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Project H.O.M.E. provides a continuum of care of services comprised of street outreach, supportive housing facilities and comprehensive services including health care, education and employment. We also work to prevent homelessness through comprehensive neighborhood-based revitalization.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Program 2

Housing

Project HOME offers supportive housing for vulnerable adults in three types of facilities: safe havens, transitional model, and permanent.

Safe havens provide a critical point of entry for chronically homeless adults with mental illness and those with co-occurring disorders. Residents have access to shelter, meals, health care, case management or psychiatric rehabilitation services, and mental health and recovery services. Twenty-four hour staffing helps residents stabilize their lives and begin their path to recovery.

Transitional model housing provides another point of entry for chronically homeless adults with special needs and includes private rooms, group meals, twenty-four hour staffing, case management or psychiatric rehabilitation services, and specialized addiction programs. Residents often begin working on education and employment plans with the goal of moving to permanent housing and greater self-sufficiency.

Permanent supportive housing serves adults and families who have stabilized their lives and are ready for more independent living. Residents, who because of their disability require regular—not constant—supportive services and supervision, pay thirty percent of their income for rent, the remainder of which is covered by federal housing subsidies.

Project HOME has developed 714 units to date; we also have 88 units under construction, 87 units in predevelopment, and 157 units in the pipeline. Among the 714 units developed are units specifically dedicated to low socioeconomic status persons who are at-risk of homelessness, as well as units earmarked for veterans who have been homeless and young adults who have experienced or are at-risk of homelessness.

Project HOME’s Outreach Coordination Center (OCC) dispatches teams around the clock throughout the city in order to build trusting relationships with individuals living on the streets so that they will accept appropriate housing placement and services. In FY 2015, the OCC made 9,544 contacts with individuals living on the streets of Philadelphia, and made 1,979 residential placements. The OCC coordinates the outreach services of four external teams in addition to the Project HOME outreach team.

Supplementing our year-round street outreach operations is our temporary walk-in engagement center, the Hub of Hope, located inside Center City Philadelphia’s Suburban Station. Many people who are homeless find shelter during cold winter months in this underground network of regional rail and subway connections, making it the ideal location to build relationships with vulnerable individuals. The Hub provides medical care, housing placements, linkages to other services, or just a safe, warm place to have a cup of coffee. In FY15, the Hub served 1,261 unique individuals, placing 176 people into different housing options around the city.

Category

Housing

Population(s) Served

Homeless

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Program 3

Opportunities for Employment

Project HOME residents and neighbors in our target area of Lower North Philadelphia have access to workforce development initiatives. Through the Adult Learning and Workforce Development Program (ALWD), we provide job training and resume building workshops, employment readiness classes, and linkages to open positions across the city. ALWD served 830 adults in FY15 with both education and employment initiatives.

Project HOME residents who need to develop employment skills and build work experience have access to our Employment Services program, which offers a job skills and job coaching initiative that works in tandem with an internship program that runs several cycles each year. Residents who may not be ready to take on regular employment or an internship have access to our Social Enterprises initiatives. These small, Project HOME-run businesses, including the HOME Spun Resale Boutique, HOME Page Café and Library Restroom Attendant Program (both located within the main branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia), and seasonal initiatives provide work experience and help residents earn income. In FY15, 68 Project HOME residents and alumni earned money in our Social Enterprises program.

Category

Employment

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Program 4

Medical Care

The Stephen Klein Wellness Center (SKWC) is a 28,000 square foot Federally Qualified Health Center that opened in late December 2014, taking the place of our St. Elizabeth’s Wellness Center, a location that offered primary, mental, and behavioral health services in our target neighborhood of Lower North Philadelphia for 18 years. Services at St. Elizabeth’s were limited, however, and didn’t address the health disparities faced by those we serve. As a federally designated Medically Underserved Area and Dental Health Shortage Professional Area, Lower North Philadelphia’s residents face lower life expectancies and higher risks of varying health problems, which contribute to the risk of homelessness. Project HOME developed SKWC with these disparities in mind. SKWC is a “health home” that offers primary, mental, and behavioral healthcare; dental care; a YMCA fitness center; a pharmacy; physical therapy; and a host of wellness services—all under a single roof and offered in a team atmosphere that maximizes whole person care. In FY15, since opening in December, SKWC held 2,475 primary care visits and 446 behavioral health visits.

Category

Health Care

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Program 5

Education

The Honickman Learning Center and Comcast Technology Labs (HLCCTL), located in our target neighborhood in Lower North Philadelphia, is a 38,000 square foot, state-of-the art learning center. Programs for children and youth including afterschool and summer programming for students in grades K-12 that provides critically needed academic, technology, and arts programming. Programming is specifically tailored to prevent summer learning loss and improve academic skills in reading, math, science, and technology. Students in our Teen Program are additionally provided with opportunities to develop employment skills through paid internships and are supported through the process of preparing for, applying to, and succeeding in post-secondary education through the College Access Program. In FY15 our K-12 afterschool and summer education programs served 351 children and youth. The Adult Learning and Workforce Development Program (ALWD), previously mentioned, also operates out of the HLLCCTL and offers adult education programs ranging from basic literacy and GED preparation to technology classes and college support.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Adults

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    According to our Strategic Plan, we have five key goals: to end chronic street homelessness in Philadelphia; to eliminate health disparities for people who are experiencing homelessness, Project HOME's residents, alumni and the children, youth and adults who live, work or go to school in Lower North Philadelphia; to improve educational and employment opportunities for Project HOME's residents, alumni and the children, youth and adults who live, work or go to school in Lower North Philadelphia; to ensure that all developments reflect the shared values of economic, social and, to the greatest extent possible, environmental sustainability; and finally to build Project HOME's capacity to achieve our mission and strategic goals.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Not available.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Not available.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Not available.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Not available.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Pennsylvania

Project HOME serves all of Philadelphia, PA, with services centering in Lower North Philadelphia, the second poorest ZIP code of our city.

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

PROJECT HOME
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Project Home

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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President and Executive Director

Sr. Mary Scullion

Associate Executive Director and Chief Financial Officer

Joan Dawson McConnon

BIO

Sister Mary Scullion has been involved in service work and advocacy for homeless and mentally ill persons since 1978. She was a co-founder, in 1985, of Woman of Hope, which provides permanent residential and support services for homeless, mentally ill women. In 1988, she founded the first Outreach Coordination Center in the nation, an innovative program coordinating private and public agencies doing outreach to chronically homeless persons living on the street.

In 1989, Sister Mary and Joan Dawson McConnon co-founded Project HOME, a nationally recognized organization that provides supportive housing, employment, education and health care to enable chronically homeless and low-income persons to break the cycle of homelessness and poverty. Under their leadership, Project HOME has grown from an emergency winter shelter to over 700 units of housing and three businesses that provide employment to formerly homeless persons. Project HOME also prevents homelessness in a low-income neighborhood in North Philadelphia. This initiative includes economic development, homeownership for the working poor, and the Honickman Learning Center and Comcast Technology Labs – a 38,000 square foot, state-of-the-art technology center that offers comprehensive educational and occupational programming.

In 2015 Project HOME opened the Stephen Klein Wellness Center. The Stephen Klein Wellness Center is a model for integrated health care including primary care, behavioral health, dental, a YMCA, pharmacy and wellness services. It serves those that are homeless and is located in the second poorest zip code in Philadelphia.

Sister Mary is also a powerful voice on political issues affecting homelessness and mentally ill persons. Her advocacy efforts resulted in the right of homeless persons to vote as well as a landmark federal court decision that affects the fair housing rights of persons with disabilities.

Sister Mary has received numerous honorary doctorates for her leadership in the City of Philadelphia. She was named 2011 Citizen of the Year by the Philadelphia Inquirer and selected by Time Magazine as one of the “World's Most Influential People in 2009". In addition, Sister Mary and Joan Dawson McConnon received the Laetare Medal from the University of Notre Dame in 2011. She was awarded the Eisenhower Fellowship in 2002 as well as the Distinguished Alumnus Eisenhower Award in 2010.

Sister Mary serves on the Board of Trustees of St. Joseph's University and the Board of the Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation. She also chaired the Hunger and Homelessness Committee for Pope Francis's visit to Philadelphia in 2015.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Kathleen Owens

Gwynedd Mercy College

Term: Nov 2010 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?