Human Services

Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, Inc.

  • Boston, MA
  • http://www.bcnc.net

Mission Statement

The mission of BCNC is to ensure that the children, youth, and families we serve have the resources and supports they need to achieve greater economic success and social well-being.

Main Programs

  1. Family Child Care & Early Education
  2. Adult Education
  3. Family Services
  4. Youth Center (YC)
  5. Arts and Enrichment & Recreation
  6. Red Oak After School Program
Service Areas

Self-reported

Massachusetts

BCNC has expanded its reach to become a critical service provider and regional leader for Asian Americans of all ages and income levels in New England, with program participants coming from Suffolk, Middlesex, Norfolk, Plymouth, Essex, Bristol, and Worcester counties. Of over 2,000 people BCNC serves each year, an equal number of its community members reside outside Boston city limits as those within. In Boston, 50% of its participants call the neighborhoods of Chinatown, South End and Back Bay home, while the other half represents virtually every neighborhood in the city, including Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. Outside Boston, 46% of BCNC's program participants are from Quincy, 26% are from the Middlesex County towns of Malden and Medford, and 28% are from surrounding areas. Recognizing the quality of BCNC services, a number of participants travel from communities that are over 20 miles away, such as Andover, Acton and Bridgewater.

ruling year

1972

Principal Officer since 2013

Self-reported

Mr. Giles Li

Keywords

Self-reported

Immigrant, Asian American, ESOL, Youth, Adult Education, Family Services, After School Programs

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Also Known As

BCNC

EIN

23-7209691

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Ethnic/Immigrant Services (P84)

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

As a family-centered organization, BCNC seeks to leverage resources and maximize impact with families through coordination and alignment of services from toddler to adult. In 2013, BCNC served over 2,000 people with an annual operating budget of $4,680,604. Focusing on low-income families, over 70% of BCNC's constituents meet poverty guidelines for food stamps, Mass Health Insurance, or subsidized child care. Of the youth served by BCNC, 88% are of Chinese descent, and 77% do not speak English at home. Of the adults served, nearly 100% are immigrants, 98% have Chinese as their primary language and one-third have less than a 9th grade education from their home country. With a long history of success, some of BCNC's 2013 accomplishments include: BCNC undertakes a successful leadership transition and names Giles Li as its new Executive Director. Executive Director Giles Li appointed to serve on newly elected Mayor Marty Walsh's transition team. BCNC was the lead agency in Boston for Asian Americans Advancing Justice's ""A Community of Contrasts"" Asian demographics report, which compiled disaggregated data across metrics such as demographic trends, civic engagement, immigration, language, education, income, employment, housing and health. BCNC met with Malden Mayor Gary Christenson to discuss how to make its services more accessible to the city's growing Asian population. BCNC's Quincy office was established, increasing access to its services to the growing Asian American community in Norfolk County. Both of its Boston and Quincy Adult ESOL programs were ranked among the state's top three Adult Education programs. Not willing to rest on its achievements, BCNC's organizational goals for 2014 are: Provide high-quality, holistic services to more than 2,000 clients through its family-centered approach. Increase access and availability of supportive youth, adult, and family services to an additional 200 clients outside of Boston/Suffolk County. Embark on the agency's next strategic planning process. BCNC works with families to determine their best plan for success and helps to find the resources to get them there, whether family and community engagement, education or workforce initiatives, childcare, or other supports. From providing quality early education and child care that supports a parent's ability to go to work, to ESOL and job readiness that moves a new immigrant from survival to success, BCNC has a proven track record that it continues to build on. BCNC's ability to design and implement innovative programs resulted in the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Families Count national award, which celebrates organizations that help support strong, capable families. BCNC's youth program was recognized by the Nellie Mae Education Foundation as a model program that engages in best practices. BCNC also received The Boston Foundation's My Neighborhood: Boston Award for improving the quality of life in Boston's neighborhoods.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Family Child Care & Early Education

There is a critical need for affordable quality early education and child care for the state's Asian American and Asian immigrant community. Unfortunately, due to prohibitive costs, limited availability, and language and cultural barriers, low-income immigrant families are less likely to receive the benefits of a high quality center based childcare program. The cost of childcare in Massachusetts is among the highest in the country. With a dearth of affordable early education and child care in the city of Boston, BCNC's Acorn Center for Early Education and Care and Family Child Care (FCC) provides affordable childcare and creates licensed home-based child care providers for critically needed services to the community. BCNC's Acorn Center for Early Education and Care is a NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) accredited program that serves families five days a week, from 7:30 to 5:30 by providing quality early childhood programming for 81 children throughout the year. Acorn was the first bilingual child care program in the state of Massachusetts. Supported by the current research on promoting children's English language acquisition and brain development, Acorn provides children with a dual language learning environment that builds English on a child's firmly developed home language and utilizes the recommended Massachusetts Guidelines for Preschool Learning. Every classroom has a Chinese speaking lead teacher who can communicate with families in their home language and understand the family's cultural practices. BCNC's Family Child Care program trains Chinese-speaking immigrant women to run a high-quality fully-licensed home-based family child care businesses. The program has three components that offer participants the support they need to become independent business owners: 1) licensing support 2) a professional network 3) intensive support services for state funded system providers. The two programs served nearly 500 participants in 2013, with 49% residing in Suffolk County, 26% in Norfolk, and 24% in Middlesex County. To learn more visit: http://bcnc.net/index.php/programs/early-education-and-care.html

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)

Asian/Pacific Islander

Other Named Groups

Budget

$1,554,481.00

Program 2

Adult Education

The need to increase English proficiency among adult immigrants is well-documented. Research shows that immigrants who do not speak English at all or do not speak it well are considerably less likely to be employed than those who speak English ""very well."" English speaking immigrants earn nearly twice that of non-English speaking workers - on average, an immigrant in Massachusetts who speaks only English earns $38,526 annually compared to an immigrant who does not speak English well, who earns $14,221 (Commonwealth Corporation Report: Breaking the Language Barrier, 2011). BCNC Adult Education program provides English language classes that are offered three days a week and are three hours long, for a total of nine hours minimum of study each week. Classes are offered both in the morning and in the evening to accommodate student schedules. Additional program activities and services include supplemental writing and computer skill classes, a volunteer tutoring program, educational and career advising, and citizenship and naturalization assistance. Of the over 400 adults served by the program each year, approximately 40% come from Suffolk County, 33% from Norfolk, 23% from Middlesex, and the remainder from Essex and Plymouth Counties. Nearly 100% are immigrants, 98% have Chinese as their primary language and one-third have less than a 9th grade education from their home country. 60% have been in the US for less than five years; of those, 46% have been here for less than one year. To learn more about the program go to: http://bcnc.net/index.php/programs/adult-education.html

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Adults

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Other Named Groups

Budget

$982,869.00

Program 3

Family Services

In the public sector, there is a growing understanding that programs that work with entire family units and with the community are essential if organizations are to tackle persistent health, educational, and economic issues. The long-held tendency of social service programs to work with individuals rather than family units has created uncoordinated and siloed prevention, intervention and treatment programs. This lack of coordinated and integrated service impacts those with highest need: immigrant and low-income families. BCNC Family Services, operating in Boston and Quincy, is a holistic parent education and family support program that uses a strengths-based approach to support participants to address their needs. This is accomplished through: * Parent Solutions, a curriculum which supports parents to be advocates for their children in public schools, has been adopted by Boston Public Schools to teach all immigrant parents how to become engaged in their children's education * Parenting Journey, a support group for parents that encourages positive parenting * Shining Star Project, to support children with autism and their families, including art classes, playgroups, expressive therapy, and support and education for parents * Health and Wellness education, such as healthy cooking classes, stress reduction workshops * Family Connectors, consisting of case management, individual consultation and counseling, information and referral services, and parent advocacy * Public education and family events * Counseling service and referrals Family Services served 300 participants in 2013. Approximately 60% of Family Services participants reside in Suffolk County, 20% in Norfolk, almost 20% in Middlesex, and the remainder in Essex. To learn more about BCNC's Family Services program go to: http://bcnc.net/index.php/programs/family-services.html

Category

Human Services, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Asian/Pacific Islander

Adults

Other Named Groups

Budget

$208,885.00

Program 4

Youth Center (YC)

Asian American and immigrant youth have many challenges in their home, school and social lives. At home, there are intergenerational conflicts with parents who do not understand American culture. Many Asian youth serve as informal interpreters for family, forcing them to take on adult responsibilities at an early age. Often both parents work, which means there are limited means for close parental supervision. A quality youth program is an important resource for Asian youth who developmentally are going through many academic and social transitions. BCNC's Youth Center addresses this need by providing culturally and linguistically sensitive education, leadership and enrichment programs that empower low-income immigrant youth with the life skills and education foundation necessary to achieve post-secondary success. YC Education: English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes for recent immigrants College Access Program supports youth from 11th grade through application process, who are usually the first in their families to finish high school YC Leadership: YouLead, a 2 year program where youth develop leadership, teamwork and mentoring skills Chinese Immigrant Student Leadership (ChISL), a 2 year program based at Charlestown High, teaching youth to be leaders and build bridges with other students Leadership culminates in a third year Youth Advisory Group (YAG) where youth develop and implement community-based projects In 2013, YC served 225 youth ages 11 to 18; 90% are low-income and 80% do not speak English at home. An estimated 85% of participants are residents of Boston, including Chinatown, South End, Allston-Brighton and South Boston; an additional 8% come from Middlesex County, 4% from Norfolk, and the remaining from Plymouth. In late 2013, BCNC Youth Center began operations in Quincy, serving over 30 youth on a weekly basis. To learn more about BCNC's Youth Center go to: http://bcnc.net/index.php/programs/youth-center.html

Category

Youth Development, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Asian/Pacific Islander

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Budget

$467,023.00

Program 5

Arts and Enrichment & Recreation

In a 2007 report, ""Access to After School Programs"" by Priscilla Little of the Harvard Family Research Project, it was found that in Massachusetts an estimated 5,700 children ages 5 to 13 are waiting for after school services. The report documented that after school program participation varied widely between low- and higher-income children as well as between minority and non-minority children. Due to the language barrier, low-income and minority parents are considerably less likely to report that it is easy to find programs that are affordable, run by trustworthy adults, conveniently located, of high quality and/or interesting to their child.BCNC recognizes the need for comprehensive, culturally competent enrichment services. Enrollment data reflect that the majority of program participants are low income; 21% speak English at home as their primary language; 74% speak a Chinese dialect; and 5% speak other languages. Of the nearly 1,000 participants served by Arts, Enrichment & Recreation in 2013, the majority reside in Suffolk; program participants also come from Middlesex, Norfolk, Bristol, and Worcester Counties. Arts & Enrichment provides after school and weekend classes to children and youth. The program is designed to increase access to quality arts education and enrichment opportunities to support children and youth to become engaged learners and empowered individuals. Offerings encourage children and youth to explore modern modes of creative expression such as contemporary music and digital storytelling, as well as traditional art forms, such as Chinese lion dance. BCNC also offers enrichment and recreation activities through a partnership with Boston Centers for Youth and Families, including sports activities for elementary school children, as well as martial arts, clinics, and leagues for adults. To learn more about BCNC's Arts & Enrichment and Recreation programs go to: http://bcnc.net/index.php/programs/arts-and-enrichment.html.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Other Named Groups

Asian/Pacific Islander

Budget

$441,864.00

Program 6

Red Oak After School Program

Research shows that after school programs can keep children and youth safe, support working families, improve academic achievement, and promote the civic and social development of young people yet in Massachusetts thousands of school-age children ages 5-13 that are waiting for afterschool services. (Harvard Family Research Project Issue Brief: Access to Afterschool Programs: Overcoming the Barriers to Getting Youth ""in the Door"", 2007). The Red Oak After School Program addresses the issue by providing affordable licensed after school child care for up to 160 children ages 5 to 13 during both the school year and summer in a multicultural and bilingual environment. The program runs from 3:00 pm to 6:15 pm during school days, 12:00 pm to 6:00 pm during half days, and 8:30 am to 6:30 pm during school vacation weeks, professional days, and the summer. Children are provided in homework help and educational activities that are aligned with the school curriculum as well as engaged in enrichment and recreation activities such as cooking clubs, multicultural arts, chess, and Taiko drumming. Red Oak served 160 participants in 2013, with 58% residing in Suffolk County, 21% in Middlesex, and 20% in Norfolk County. To learn more visit: http://bcnc.net/index.php/programs/after-school.html

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Asian/Pacific Islander

Other Named Groups

Budget

$599,140.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    BCNC believes that families have enormous potential to thrive, and that when immigrants are able to participate fully in society and create their own success stories, all of society benefits. BCNC's vision is that: * Families and individuals are self-sufficient; * Families are strong, healthy, and safe; * Children have opportunities for school success; and * Neighborhoods are strong and cohesive. BCNC defines family as an interdependent group of individuals who are related biologically, legally, emotionally, or by a shared sense of history who are committed to each other and the group's well-being. BCNC believes that building and strengthening the capacity of families will ultimately impact the larger community to address their own needs.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Programs that work with the entire family and with the community are essential if organizations are to tackle the persistent educational and economic issues facing the towns and cities of the region. The long-held tendency of social service programs to work with individual units rather than family units has created uncoordinated and siloed prevention, intervention and treatment programs. This lack of coordinated and integrated service impacts those with highest need: immigrant and low-income families. To counter this lack of coordinated service delivery, BCNC's approach is to invest in impact for families. BCNC's family-centered approach recognizes that families and individuals do not face life challenges one at a time, therefore it offers constituents access to a holistic array of services that build on their strengths and offer support for their vulnerabilities. The organization believes that impact on one family can be improved through the coordination of services and provision of culturally competent professional support informed by each individual's personal identity and family history. BCNC programs are built on supporting five recognized protective factors that strengthen families: parental/caregiver resilience, social connections, social and emotional competence of children, knowledge of parenting and child development, and concrete support in times of need. BCNC's strengthening families objective is achieved through the following strategies: Facilitation of Friendships and Mutual Supports Strengthen Parenting Respond to Family Crises Link Families to Services and Opportunities Value and Support Individuals Facilitate Social and Emotional Development Observe and Respond to Early Warning Signs of Abuse and Neglect Empower communities to address identified needs Enhance community stakeholder capacity to advocate on its own behalf
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    BCNC has nearly half a century of community-based experience in serving the diverse Asian American population in the Greater Boston area. As an organization, BCNC has evolved along with the changing and growing Asian American community, and its family-centered programs have been proven to tangibly impact individuals and families on a sustainable basis. BCNC currently has 80 full and part-time staff on payroll, and over 300 active volunteers. The leadership structure of the organization is comprised of an Executive Director that manages the day to day operations of the agency and a 14 member Board of Directors that provides financial oversight, supports fundraising, sets the mission and vision of the agency, and supervises the Executive Director. Responsible directly to the Executive Director is administrative management staff that includes the Director of Development, Director of Finance and Administration, and Director of Programs. The Development Office is responsible for all fundraising as well as marketing activity. This includes individual donor cultivation; government, corporate and foundation grant writing, as well as special events. The Finance Office is tasked with maintaining BCNC's unblemished record of sound fiscal management as demonstrated through annual audits. BCNC is debt-free and maintains three months of operating reserves on hand. A cost-effective approach to high quality services is employed and a broad base of financial support is consistently maintained.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    BCNC has invested over a quarter of a million dollars in program evaluation and related systems, including a customized Social Solutions Efforts To Outcomes (ETO) deployment and a full-time Learning & Evaluation Manager. In order to achieve maximum impact and sustainability, BCNC strongly believes that programs and services should be evidence-based and community-centered. BCNC's deep commitment to evaluation enables us to monitor program effectiveness and strategic progress. In addition, BCNC regularly undergoes agency-wide strategic planning, with the next process scheduled to take place in late 2014. These strategic planning processes incorporate internal data, external research, program participant feedback, and Asian American community trends in evaluating how far BCNC has come, where it currently is, and what it will be focusing on moving forward.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Over the past 45 years, BCNC has effectively served the Asian American community in the Greater Boston area with a proven, award-winning track record. It is one of the largest Asian social service providers in New England, and its holistic, family-centered toddler-to-adult programming enables impacts to be both wide in scope and deep in impact. However, just as the Asian American community is rapidly expanding throughout the Greater Boston area, BCNC is also actively working to increase access to its services. While sustaining its high quality programming in Boston, in the coming years, BCNC plans to invest heavily in serving and supporting Asian Americans in geographic areas outside of Boston, such as Quincy and Malden. BCNC will also be integrating a research-based family-centered approach into its programmatic framework to further align services with its vision for a strong, viable community.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Massachusetts

BCNC has expanded its reach to become a critical service provider and regional leader for Asian Americans of all ages and income levels in New England, with program participants coming from Suffolk, Middlesex, Norfolk, Plymouth, Essex, Bristol, and Worcester counties. Of over 2,000 people BCNC serves each year, an equal number of its community members reside outside Boston city limits as those within. In Boston, 50% of its participants call the neighborhoods of Chinatown, South End and Back Bay home, while the other half represents virtually every neighborhood in the city, including Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. Outside Boston, 46% of BCNC's program participants are from Quincy, 26% are from the Middlesex County towns of Malden and Medford, and 28% are from surrounding areas. Recognizing the quality of BCNC services, a number of participants travel from communities that are over 20 miles away, such as Andover, Acton and Bridgewater.

Funding Needs

While the numbers of families in Massachusetts qualifying for and utilizing state-funded services has skyrocketed, the funding for many programs that ease the burden of poverty and support children's development were cut due to state budget shortfalls. For instance, in 2012 the state cut funding to public pre-kindergarten child care by 38%, making affordable child care less available for working parents (Kahn, Charlotte B.; Martin, Jessica K. City of Ideas: Reinventing Boston's Innovation Economy (2012), p. 36). Lack of low-cost child care makes staying home and out of the workforce a more cost-effective option for many parents. BCNC's Acorn Center for Early Education and Care fills an important gap in affordable high quality child care services for low-income immigrant families. Approximately 70% of BCNC's Acorn families meet Federal poverty guidelines and receive assistance to support the cost of care. The program allows families to focus on working or participating in job training to advance their careers and achieve greater self-sufficiency, and provides children with the skills for school success. Additionally, the state's health promotion and disease prevention programs were cut by 77% and employment services by 80%. BCNC's nutrition and exercise programs for adults, and recreational activities for youth, provide linguistically and culturally appropriate outreach and health education that is no longer provided by the state. Families are further supported by BCNC in navigating the Boston Public School system and social service departments to ensure they have access to the resources they need. BCNC's Adult Education program provides new immigrants with language classes and job preparation classes—all of which put immigrants on a path to increased education, career advancement and integration.

Accreditations

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) - 3 Year Accreditation

Massachusetts Department of Early and Secondary Education (Mass DESE)

Massachusetts Department of Early and Secondary Education (Mass DESE)

Affiliations + Memberships

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member

Associated Grant Makers

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

BOSTON CHINATOWN NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER INC
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
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Principal Officer

Mr. Giles Li

BIO

Giles Li joined BCNC as program manager in 2006 and was promoted to Director of Programs in 2011, where he held management responsibility over all agency programs. With more than a decade of experience in the nonprofit sector, Giles has a proven track record of direct service, advocacy work, and management experience. Having grown up locally in an immigrant family, he has a life-long connection and commitment to the community in and beyond Chinatown. Giles is a recognized thought leader and public speaker in Asian American communities nationwide. He holds a Masters degree in Public Affairs from UMass-Boston and is an alumnus of the Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership at Boston University's (BU) School of Management. Giles has also served as adjunct faculty in the Asian American Studies program at UMass-Boston, and he is currently a mentor for the Community Fellows Program at BU.

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

"Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC) was founded in 1969 based on two premises - community members know best what their needs are, and strong families contribute to strong communities. Throughout the years BCNC has remained true to its commitment to being responsive to the needs of those we serve while striving for excellence in the delivery of those services. I truly believe these core values are why we have naturally expanded beyond the Chinatown neighborhood-based after school program we started out as so many years ago. BCNC's development into a $5 million organization is necessitated in our responsiveness to the needs of the families we serve, which has been demonstrated time and again throughout our history. BCNC's connection to the community is reflected in the diversity of our leadership, staff, and the strengths-based approach in empowering and learning from our participants that permeates all of our programing. Growing up locally in an Asian immigrant family, spending more than a decade in Boston's non-profit field, and now serving as BCNC's Executive Director, I have personally witnessed the changing demographics of our constituent population and the rapid growth of Asian populations in the region (2010 US Census). Boston's Asian population grew by 27% between 2000 and 2010, which was the fastest growing race group, but still does not even compare to the growth in cities like Quincy (65%) and Malden (51%). It is because of population shifts like these that BCNC identified a priority area in our most recent strategic plan, to address the changing demographics of Chinatown. Because of changes in environment, housing prices, and social support networks in the region, large numbers of families are choosing to live in other places. In the past several years, BCNC has seen a consistent number of constituents coming to us from these cities and towns. As an organization that considers the full range of needs among our constituents, it became clear that we needed to establish a site outside of Chinatown to best support families where they live, work, and play. This is the motivation behind the recent opening of our Quincy-based office, and we are continuing to look ahead, and preparing the organization to offer our expertise and high-quality services to the communities where we can maximize impact. As the growing Asian population spreads outside of Boston, both community needs and community-based social service infrastructure echo those of Chinatown thirty years ago - poverty, linguistic isolation, lack of affordable child care, untreated mental health issues, need for civic engagement and participation, and a dearth of culturally competent, multi-service providers. Now, more than ever, there is a clear need for a regional organization like BCNC, with a proven track record of innovative, family-centered, collaborative, and culturally and ethnically competent services. BCNC was founded by the community in order to fulfill community needs, and we continue to do so within the context of our constituent population becoming more diverse, expansive, and multi-generational. Today, BCNC is honored to be one of the largest regional social service providers for Asian American and Asian immigrant families in the area. Moving forward, even as the community's geographic boundaries change and grow, we will continue to work to make our services more accessible to those most in need of our support. Giles Li Executive Director"

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ms. Selina Chow

No Affiliation

Term: May 2009 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


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BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?