Environmental Quality Protection, Beautification

The Trust For Public Land

  • San Francisco, CA
  • www.tpl.org

Mission Statement

The Trust for Public Land conserves land for people to enjoy as parks, gardens, and natural places, ensuring livable communities for generations to come.

Main Programs

  1. Parks for People
  2. Land and Water
  3. Working Lands

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1978

chief executive

Mr. Will Rogers

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

conservation, parks, public land, gardens, community gardens, national, GIS, watershed, coastal, forests, wilderness, urban parks, greenways, trails, voters, trust, open space, wilderness, playground

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

23-7222333

Physical Address

101 Montgomery St Suite 900

San Francisco, 94104

Also Known As

Trust for Public Land

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Founded in 1972, The Trust for Public Land is the leading nonprofit working to conserve land for people. Operating from more than 30 offices nationwide, The Trust for Public Land has protected more than three million acres from the inner city to the wilderness and helped generate more than $34 billion in public funds for conservation. Nearly ten million people live within a ten-minute walk of a Trust for Public Land park, garden, or natural area, and millions more visit these sites every year. Learn more at www.tpl.org

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Parks for People

The Trust for Public Land works in cities and suburbs across America to ensure that everyone, in particular every child, enjoys close-to-home access to a park, playground, garden, or natural area.

For the 80 percent of Americans who live in or near a city, neighborhood parks offer the closest connection to nature. Yet, today there is only 1 park for every 14,000 people in America. As a result, an entire generation is growing up disconnected from nature and the outdoors, missing out on the fun, fitness, and relaxation that parks provide.

In park-poor neighborhoods, children play in streets, alleyways, or vacant lots instead of on grassy meadows or soccer fields. Or they simply stay inside—a national crisis of inactivity that has contributed to higher rates of obesity, diabetes, asthma, anxiety, and depression.

Research shows that parks promote public health and revitalize local economies. They make cities more energy-efficient and less vulnerable to the effects of climate change. They connect neighbors to the great outdoors and to each other.

The Trust for Public Land was founded to conserve land for people to enjoy as parks, gardens, and other natural places, and we’re still the only large conservation organization focused on this goal. Today, nearly ten million Americans live within a ten-minute walk of a park or natural area we’ve protected. We’re working toward a day when everyone has easy access to a safe, green place to play.

Category

None

Budget

Population Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Adults

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Program 2

Land and Water

The Trust for Public Land conserves wilderness, including places that safeguard clean drinking water and preserve the natural beauty of coasts and waterways.

The American conservation movement was born from a shared desire to protect our wildest places. Early visionaries proposed setting aside land to safeguard natural resources and connect people to the great outdoors. These park pioneers believed that as cities grew, access to nature would become one measure of a great nation.

Today, the wilderness and waterways they protected are integral to our health, happiness, and quality of life. In addition to providing unsurpassed opportunities for recreation and renewal, these special places perform critical behind-the-scenes services—from helping mitigate the effects of climate change to protecting clean drinking water for millions of Americans.

With an estimated two million acres of land lost to development every year, preserving these places is more important than ever. The Trust for Public Land helps communities nationwide balance the demands of growth with the protection of wilderness and open space. We use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology to identify and prioritize conservation goals—then we employ our finance, legal, and transaction expertise to accomplish them. Whether improving the health of a local bay or preserving public access to a beloved mountain trail, we're protecting life-giving land and water resources for all to enjoy.

Category

None

Budget

Population Served

None

None

None

Program 3

Working Lands

The Trust for Public Land protects farms, ranches, forests, and other working lands that foster a healthy, vibrant agricultural system and support land-based livelihoods.

America’s farms, ranches, and working forests yield food and timber, support local economies, safeguard clean water, and form some of our nation’s most beautiful landscapes. Whether a deep northern forest, an emerald mosaic of ranchland in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains, or the last farm in a New England town, working lands supply valuable resources and a link to our shared rural heritage.

These places are too important to lose. But in many communities, rising property values are making it difficult for ranchers and farmers to pay taxes on their land, or to resist the pressure to sell to eager developers.

The Trust for Public Land partners with landowners and public agencies to keep working lands working, preserving their benefits to the environment and the greater community. Often, we use conservation easements to safeguard property from development while compensating the landowner for the value such development might represent. This strategy conserves productive land and enables ranching, farming, or sustainable forestry to continue.

Our work protects both land and livelihoods—beautiful farms, meadows, and forests that support our jobs, our health, and our quality of life.

Category

None

Budget

Population Served

None

None

None

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

Social Media

@tpl.org

@TPL_org

@+trustpublicland

@the-trust-for-public-land

@TrustforPublicLand

@trustpublicland/

Videos

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

THE TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND
Fiscal year: Apr 01-Mar 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

The Trust For Public Land

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Mr. Will Rogers

BIO

Will Rogers is the president and CEO of The Trust for Public Land. He has been with the organization since 1991, first as the director of California, Hawaii, and Nevada operations and as CEO beginning in 1998.

Rogers is a nationally recognized advocate for land conservation and has given major addresses or interviews to the Urban Land Institute, the National Smart Growth Conference, the National Brownfields Conference, and Talk of the Nation, among others.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mrs. Paige Knudson Cowles

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Race & Ethnicity
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Senior Staff, Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.

Disability
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Senior Staff, Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.