Educational Institutions

La Raza United

  • Houston, TX
  • www.larazaunited.org

Mission Statement

We lead Latino youth and adults to further improvements in their quality of life and civic engagement.

Main Programs

  1. Intensive ESL
  2. Bilingual GED Preparation Class
  3. Electricity (Vocational training)
  4. Youth Empowerment Program (YEP)
  5. Zumba
Service Areas

Self-reported

Texas

La Raza United's service area is composed of zip codes of 77011, 77023, 77020, 77029, 77012, 77017, 77087, and 77003. These zip codes are located in Houston's Southeast area, which is locally known as the Greater East End area. The analysis using US Census data found that that the Houston's East End area has been a historical low-mid income area heavily populated by Latino/Hispanics. There are approximately 234,128 people living in the East End area. More than half (52.3%) of the population is male, and 48.7% is female. The majority of them (80.6%) are Latino/Hispanic and about 30% of them are recent Latino immigrants, mostly from Mexico and Central America. Moreover, about one in three (28%) of the population in the East End either doesn't speak English or doesn't speak it well. That is more than twice compared to Houston's percentage at 13.7%. The average age in the area is 31 years of age. The average household income in the target area is $33,700, lower than the average income for South East Houston of $48,020 and a significantly lower than Houston's average of $59,354.
Around 31% of the population in the target area are living below the poverty level. The unemployment rate in the area is about 7.1% (compared to 5.5% for the City of Houston average) and 21.9% of the targeted population uses food stamps.
Geographically, the target area is located on the eastern edge of downtown to the Port of Houston and South to Hobby Airport. The area is home to Houston's early history and industry and was the site of the Town of Harrisburg, the seat of government for the Republic of Texas in 1836. Although the East End consists of many different ethnic groups, Latinos make up almost 75% of the 234,128 resident. The target area includes two of Houston's oldest Hispanic neighborhoods, Magnolia Park, and Second Ward. Second Ward is also known as Segundo Barrio, one of the four original wards of the city in the nineteenth century. The Magnolia and Second Ward today have mainly Mexican American residents and to date is the Center of local Latino political forces. The northern end of the community is largely industrial, leading to massive warehouse complexes along the Bayou. There are also many industrial buildings, some of which have found new life as lofts, on the western edge of the neighborhood nearest to Downtown.
The East End area is beset by low education performance, high dropout rates, and low college completion levels. Among the population over the age of 25, almost half (47.1%) have not graduated from high school compared to Houston's average of 25%. Only 13.4% have obtained a Post-Secondary education degree after high school compared to Houston's average of 33.8%.

ruling year

2011

President / CEO since 2008

Self-reported

Luis Angel Garcia-Alvarez

Keywords

Self-reported

Adult Education Youth Empowerment ESL, GED, Literacy Electricity, Zumba Job Skills

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EIN

26-2955047

 Number

3348749781

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Intensive ESL

Our Intensive English program has been carefully designed in order to assure the best approach of every student. We have developed a modern and efficient methodology named TMI Method ©. The English course has 16 levels (beginner, intermediate, and advanced), and aims to prepare adults for written and verbal self-sufficiency in the community, the home, and the office.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Adults

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Hispanics

Budget

65210.76

Program 2

Bilingual GED Preparation Class

GED Instructor provides a weekly, 4-hour-long, bilingual GED-preparation class to students.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Adults

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Hispanics

Budget

9880.99

Program 3

Electricity (Vocational training)

Not available

Category

Employment

Population(s) Served

Adults

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Hispanics

Budget

14821.49

Program 4

Youth Empowerment Program (YEP)

YAP assists Houston’s courts in preventing youth offenders from engaging in misconduct. YAP Instructor provides at-risk, truant youth participants with monthly, 3 hour-long interactive class on how to make positive life choices and good decisions.

Category

Crime & Legal

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Crime/Abuse Victims

Budget

13642.5

Program 5

Zumba

Zumba-certified instructor teaches students hour-long Zumba class daily (Mon-Fri afternoons).

Category

Recreation & Sports

Population(s) Served

Adults

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Hispanics

Budget

12351.24

Service Areas

Self-reported

Texas

La Raza United's service area is composed of zip codes of 77011, 77023, 77020, 77029, 77012, 77017, 77087, and 77003. These zip codes are located in Houston's Southeast area, which is locally known as the Greater East End area. The analysis using US Census data found that that the Houston's East End area has been a historical low-mid income area heavily populated by Latino/Hispanics. There are approximately 234,128 people living in the East End area. More than half (52.3%) of the population is male, and 48.7% is female. The majority of them (80.6%) are Latino/Hispanic and about 30% of them are recent Latino immigrants, mostly from Mexico and Central America. Moreover, about one in three (28%) of the population in the East End either doesn't speak English or doesn't speak it well. That is more than twice compared to Houston's percentage at 13.7%. The average age in the area is 31 years of age. The average household income in the target area is $33,700, lower than the average income for South East Houston of $48,020 and a significantly lower than Houston's average of $59,354.
Around 31% of the population in the target area are living below the poverty level. The unemployment rate in the area is about 7.1% (compared to 5.5% for the City of Houston average) and 21.9% of the targeted population uses food stamps.
Geographically, the target area is located on the eastern edge of downtown to the Port of Houston and South to Hobby Airport. The area is home to Houston's early history and industry and was the site of the Town of Harrisburg, the seat of government for the Republic of Texas in 1836. Although the East End consists of many different ethnic groups, Latinos make up almost 75% of the 234,128 resident. The target area includes two of Houston's oldest Hispanic neighborhoods, Magnolia Park, and Second Ward. Second Ward is also known as Segundo Barrio, one of the four original wards of the city in the nineteenth century. The Magnolia and Second Ward today have mainly Mexican American residents and to date is the Center of local Latino political forces. The northern end of the community is largely industrial, leading to massive warehouse complexes along the Bayou. There are also many industrial buildings, some of which have found new life as lofts, on the western edge of the neighborhood nearest to Downtown.
The East End area is beset by low education performance, high dropout rates, and low college completion levels. Among the population over the age of 25, almost half (47.1%) have not graduated from high school compared to Houston's average of 25%. Only 13.4% have obtained a Post-Secondary education degree after high school compared to Houston's average of 33.8%.

Social Media

Funding Needs

There are other factors that help document the need for this program in such area. First, with an already low-income and low educational constraints, and constant increases in the cost of higher education and decreases in federal and state financial aid available, there is less post-secondary education (PSE) opportunities to residents of the target area. According to a recent report by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the cost of higher education has increased by an average of 50% in the last five years in Texas public universities. However, even when getting into college is accomplished, the battle for a PSE degree is not won since graduation rates from the public Colleges and Universities that minority students can afford extremely low. Based on the latest data from the State agency cited above, only 10% of students entering the University of Houston-Downtown (UHD), a local university close to the target area with reasonable admission requirements and tuition, will graduate within six years. Moreover, for students attending Houston Community College (HCC), only 34% will complete their associate program and only 12% will transfer to a four-year institution. Some researchers have found that a significant factor contributing to the low graduation rates in College is the bad advising students receive at their school career and counseling departments and/or from their degree advisors. Second, cultural attitudes about seeking PSE degree are negative among Latinos and African-Americans students. A recent survey showed that less than 20% thought that not seeking a PSE degree was a negative decision compared to 60% in the White Non-minority communities. Community norms and beliefs have been found to be directly related to individual attitudes and beliefs. Fourth, the target area is also beset by high crime, teen pregnancy and other antecedents for low PSE seeking behaviors. First, According to City of Houston Police Department statistics, the crime rate in the East End area is 2.4 higher than the overall average of Houston. The East End reported Crime in 2015 was the number of 7419, a little above from the 7284 from the South East and quiet above from the Houston's 5685 (/100k people). There were 1294 Violent Crime (/100k people) reported in the East End, 1270 (/100k people) in the South East, and 5685 (/100k people) in the Houston area. All of the of the crime indicator rates in the target area are above the average, making this area a crucial point where educational resources are a key factor to improve the quality of life of its residents. Researchers have found that increasing crime and incarceration rates, much of which is unjustified in the hands of a discriminatory and unjust judiciary system against low-income populations, especially among young Latino and African American youths significantly limits both secondary and PSE opportunities for minority communities. Teen pregnancy is also a problem for seeking PSE degree. Many of young women, as well as young men, have to abandon their education as they can care for their children and seeking low-income minimum wage jobs. In regards to unexpected teen pregnancy, more than 16 million women 15–19 years old give birth each year, about 11% of all births worldwide. Moreover, the East End area has one of the highest adolescent pregnancy rates in the Houston area. The adolescence pregnancy rate in the East End is of 50-75 (/1000 females aged 15-19), having the same rate for the South East, and 25-50 as a Houston's average rate. The percentage of single-mother households in the East End is also higher with a 22.9%, compared with a 22% for the South East and a 21.1% for the Houston's average. 95% of these births occurs in low- and middle-income families. The average adolescent birth rate in middle-income families is more than twice as high as that in high-income families, with the rate in low-income families being five times as high. In low- and middle-income families, almost 10% of girls become mothers by age 16 years, with the highest rates in Latino and African American neighborhoods. Births to unmarried adolescent mothers are far more likely to be unintended and are more likely to end in induced abortion. Coerced sex, reported by 10% of girls who first had sex before age 15 years, contributes to unwanted adolescent pregnancies. Many girls who become pregnant have to leave school. Unexpected pregnancy has long-term implications for them as individuals, their families, and communities. Studies have shown that delaying adolescent births could significantly lower population growth rates, potentially generating broad economic and social benefits, in addition to improving the health of adolescents. Adolescence pregnancy rate in the East End is a is about 50-75 (/1000 females 15-19), having the South East the same estimated numbers, and both having higher rates than the Houston average of 25-50 (/1000 females 15-19).

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Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

La Raza United

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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President / CEO

Luis Angel Garcia-Alvarez

BIO

Within the last 12 years, Mr. Garcia-Alvarez has become a highly experienced and skilled Latino community leader. With a Master's Degree in Human Rights and International Law from the Instituto Europeo Campus Stellae (Santiago de Compostela, Spain) to his name, Mr. Garcia-Alvarez has demonstrated his dedication to his community from an early age. Volunteering in several community affairs in Mexico during his high school years, he learned the patience and responsibility that comes from being a leader. After his mother died when he was a teenager at a car accident, and he being injured in the same accident, they were assisted by volunteer paramedics. He realized the importance of social services and started to volunteer in numerous programs. Once in Houston, he became getting involved with the nonprofit environment, learning about at-risk families' concerns in the US, as well as community and political organizing. With lots of projects waiting to be worked on, he loves to work in benefit of our needed communities not only for Latinos but to all of those who need a boost to succeed in life. As Founder and current President of LRU, Mr. Garcia-Alvarez has provided inspirational leadership and direction to all executives, and ensure the continued development and management of a professional and efficient organization; established effective decision-making processes that enable to achieve its long- and short-term goals and objectives. Mr. Garcia-Alvarez has have the opportunity to advocate for education reforms at the state and local level, including reforms that increase teacher and principal effectiveness, support school autonomy with accountability, and expand instructional time, which improves student achievement and close the achievement gap. Recruiting parents, educators, and community members to build a strong community oriented to education success. By working in various nonprofit organizations Mr. Garcia-Alvarez had the opportunity of Supervise the administration of specially funded or contract projects assigned to the Adult Education area. He also supervised personnel working with assigned instructional programs, and oversaw the distribution of all publicity material for Adult Education events. Mr. Garcia-Alvarez currently works in several programs and committees; he is part of the Harris County Juvenile Advisory Board, Super neighborhood #51 delegate, HISD Superintendent's Public Engagement Committee, Rice University Undergraduate Research Symposium (RURS) judging table, and a member of the NHPO (National Hispanic Professionals Organization).

STATEMENT FROM THE President / CEO

"Every day more young people are dropping out of school, more teenagers are getting pregnant, more families are getting separated, more parents are losing their jobs, and education should be an important part of an at risk family. It's a worthy idea, to bring educational and cultural resources for those individuals, for those teenagers who have lost their path, for those single mothers who desire a better life for their children, for those parents who are proudly in charge of their families and want to succeed and improve their quality of life, for all of those who wants to grow and succeed. We are working to make a difference in our communities and we need your help to make it happen.
As a result of reflecting on my accomplishments and activities in leadership in adult education, youth awareness, and civic engagement my definition of leadership is the creating of conditions that cause a group of people to get done what they need to get done.
Luis A. Garcia-Alvarez
"

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Luis Angel Garcia-Alvarez

La Raza United

Term: July 2008 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Race & Ethnicity
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
Yes
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
Yes
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
Yes
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
Yes
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
Yes
We have a diversity committee in place
Yes
We have a diversity manager in place
Yes
We have a diversity plan
Yes
We use other methods to support diversity
Diversity notes from the nonprofit
La Raza United focus on diversity at all levels. Fully embracing the concept of diversity is necessary for achieving a vibrant, inclusive community that reflects the world beyond our efforts, challenges and encourages us to broaden our perspectives and worldviews, and helps to fully prepare students to make valuable contributions as citizens of a diverse, globally integrated world. Our diversity model: • Recognizes how identities and social positions shape and are shaped by our understandings of the world, ourselves and those around us. • Takes responsibility for learning about and being empathetic to the experiences and perspectives of each member of our inclusive community. • Respects differences among individuals and groups. • Builds and sustains equitable systems, actions and attitudes. • Emphasizes the historical context of diversity at our community. • Infuses a focus on justice and inclusion in all levels of decision-making, policies, and practices.