Youth Development

THE GREENHOUSE

  • Sacramento, CA
  • www.thegreenhousecenter.org

Mission Statement

Our mission is to cultivate a thriving community by nurturing the emotional, spiritual, intellectual, and physical development of our youth and inspiring them to grow to their full potential.

Main Programs

  1. Evergreen
  2. R4
  3. Leaders in Training (LIT)
  4. Oasis
  5. Club 56

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Service Areas

Self-reported

California

We serve a specific neighborhood in the Gardenland/Northgate neighborhood of Sacramento, with over 550 kids living on one square block  - more kids per capita than any block in the greater Sacramento area. The youth of our neighborhood are susceptible to several risk factors, including: criminal activity, drug use, drug trafficking, gang affiliation, teen pregnancy, truancy, and apathy towards school. Some of the youth have already engaged in illegal activity and are on probation; some are teen moms or dads; some are failing their classes; some are using and selling drugs.

ruling year

2003

Executive Director since 2013

Self-reported

Mr. Brian C Heller de Leon

Keywords

Self-reported

after-school tutoring, mentoring, youth development, leadership development, spiritual development, youth groups, summer day camp

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EIN

30-0116551

 Number

2837767238

Physical Address

2201 Northview Dr.

Sacramento, CA 95833

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Student Services and Organizations (B80)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

1. 75% of our "GreenHouse Graduates" enroll in college, a crucial pathway out of poverty for their families. We have a 100% graduation rate for those students who stayed involved with our program through their senior year.

2. We've seen an increased investment in the neighborhood by the City of Sacramento in response to a three-year advocacy effort conducted by students in our "Leaders in Training" program, including a $180,000 new soccer field and other improvements at Niños Park, the local city park.

3. Teachers, parents, and children reporting that they feel safer in the neighborhood, have a stronger sense of self-efficacy, and that youth are making measurable improvements in their academics. These improvements are demonstrated through a recent CSU Sacramento research partnership with the Child Development Department, showing statistically significant improvements in reading levels and sense of self-efficacy among participants, and through parent and youth surveys. We regularly evaluate our impact by looking at long-term trends in youth developmental assets, grade-level proficiency, and math and English competency.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Evergreen

Evergreen provides 25 kids in 1st through 6th grade with a safe, fun, and nurturing environment in which to work on homework, improve academic skills, and participate in recreational activities. Children are paired with an adult volunteer, a “Study Buddy,” who helps them with homework and develops a mentoring relationship with them. Because we believe strongly in the importance of relationships, we maintain a low child-to-adult ratio (3:1). Each of our Study Buddies works with the same group of kids each week, allowing them to develop a close relationship and establish consistency in the kids’ lives. In addition to working on homework, Evergreen students complete Rocket Math worksheets to improve their math skills and Read Naturally passages to increase their reading fluency. On Fridays, kids participate in Workshops such as art, community newspaper, computers, and sewing. Workshop experiences stimulate their creativity, boost their self-confidence, and help them discover their gifts and talents.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Budget

34,395

Program 2

R4

R4 provides a safe, nurturing environment after-school where students in 7th through 12th grade can improve academic achievement, prepare for college, and learn new skills. The four Rs in R4 stand for: Relationships (building positive relationships with peers and mentors), Reading/ Writing/ Arithmetic (achieving greater competency in academic skills), Resources (accessing the resources needed to achieve future success), and Realizing (realizing our full potential together).  At R4, teens are paired with an adult volunteer who helps them with homework and develops a mentoring relationship with them. 

 

In addition to working on homework, R4 students complete Take Aim! at Vocabulary worksheets to increase their word knowledge, as well as various algebra and reading comprehension worksheets to boost these skills. R4 students participate in workshops throughout the year (computers, guitar, photography, community newspaper) which give them exposure to various art forms. Finally, students take field trips to local colleges, universities, and technical institutes to tour their facilities, meet students and faculty, and learn about their entrance requirements. R4 runs on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons from 4:00-6:00.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Budget

23,108

Program 3

Leaders in Training (LIT)

Leaders in Training (LIT) is a youth leadership team that gives youth an opportunity to develop their leadership potential.  A small team of youth (grades 7-12) is selected to serve on the team for one year. During the first half of the year (November-March), the team focuses on learning about leadership, service, and giftedness. Guest speakers from the community share personal stories with the team about how they have used their gifts in order to make positive changes in their communities. Team members learn about their own areas of interest and giftedness by taking personality inventories. They are also exposed to a variety of service projects and spend time volunteering in various capacities. 

 

During the second half of the year (April -August), LIT members break into three smaller teams based on their areas of interest and giftedness. These teams plan, develop and implement mini-service projects that address an area of the community that they care about. Projects are completed during the summer. At the end of their term, LIT members take a special field trip as a reward for their hard-work and determination. LIT meets weekly on Monday evenings from 6:00-7:00.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Budget

17,658

Program 4

Oasis

Evening youth group for junior and senior high students, focused on character formation, cultivation of ethical lens for personal decision making, building healthy relationships with adults and peers, and leadership development.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Female Youth/Adolescents (14 - 19 years)

Budget

16,074

Program 5

Club 56

Club 56 is a leadership and character development program for 5th and 6th graders in the neighborhood.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

11,233

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Goal 1: Improved academics, combined with improved academic self-confidence & enjoyment.

    Goal 2: Increased vision for positive life-outcomes and pathways to achieve those outcomes. Examples include awareness of college pathways, identifying areas of strength and passion, and having healthy adults invested in the lives of youth long-term.

    Goal 3: Leadership development and the formation of an ethical lens for making important life choices, especially for our 5th and 6th graders and our teens. We use mentoring, leadership development activities, and a nationally recognized character building curriculum that increases the self-worth of youth and helps them to reflect on the difficult ethical choices they face every day.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    GreenHouse staff and volunteers will implement the following program strategies to achieve our goals:

    1. Academic supports during the "Evergreen" and "R4" programs in the form of tutoring and mentoring three days per week from local university students and retired teachers, with reading/math enrichment workshops twice per week.

    2. Year-Round life skill building workshops such as healthy eating, photography, cooking, science, sports, and music.

    3. Regular field trips to gain exposure to resources and opportunities outside of the neighborhood.

    4. Character formation through critical reflection on peer pressures and life choices, using a nationally-recognized curriculum in Club 56, as well as through service projects with infirm elderly patients at a local assisted living facility.

    5. Strong relationships with healthy adults who serve as role models, and who reinforce the positive values of parents.

    6. A safe and well-designed facility for youth, situated in the center of a neighborhood infamous for drugs, street violence, and gang activity.

    7. Youth Leadership Development: We offer a leadership and civic advocacy program for high school students that provides a safe and encouraging environment for exploring academic goals, and coaches students to develop their passion for community service. Our Leaders in Training program ensures our students complete high school with self-confidence and a sense of ownership for their community's positive development.

    8. A new Healthy Lifestyle Program: The GreenHouse has implemented three programs that promote healthy exercise, access to freshly farmed produce, and nutritional classes that help families understand how to make healthy choices.

    a. Youth Soccer Team: In 2016 we launched a youth soccer team that not only teaches 5th & 6th grade students how to work as a team and provides leadership lessons, but also promotes regular physical activity in a fun context. Research shows that young children are more likely to make exercise a part of their daily routine when it is anchored in an activity deemed to be fun.

    b. Community Garden: We recently renovated a community garden that serves as an outdoor classroom for our youth. Through the garden, our students gain access to fresh produce and learn how to plant, maintain and harvest seasonal vegetables. This program not only build each students understanding of how they are connected to the food they eat, but gives them an opportunity provide for their own families.

    c. Healthy Living Workshops: Through our program targeted at high school students, we hold Healthy Living Workshops that focus on helping our students make good health decisions. In addition to helping students develop a healthy diet, the Healthy Living workshops take students through an anti-tobacco course, build an awareness of the dangers of drugs and alcohol and provide coaching on how to de-escalate violent altercations.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Director of Elementary Programs - 5 years experience, college graduate

    Director Youth/Teen Programs - 4 years experience, college graduate, working on masters degree

    Program Support Coordinator who oversees recruitment & management of program volunteers, as well as data collection and program evaluation - 3 years experience, college graduate, working on masters degree

    Executive Director who provides staff support, organizational strategy, program development, and fundraising & administrative infrastructure.

    50-60 weekly volunteers recruited from local universities, businesses, high schools, and churches

    Research partnerships with CSU Sacramento and UC Davis to support program evaluation and program improvement

    Strong, consistent, energetic board of directors

    15 year track-record of effective programming & trusting relationships built with community members
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    >> Goal 1 Indicators: Increases in grade-level proficiency over time. Increases in pre- and post-tests, which provides self-reporting by students on self-confidence, enjoyment, and group participation in reading and mathematics.

    >> Goal 2 Indicators: Increases from pre- and post-test assessment on developmental assets, on such resiliency and youth development determinant factors such as whether children have adults in their lives who are about them, importance and enjoyment of school and schoolwork, having a vision for doing "great things with their lives" (sample question from pre/post test).

    >> Goal 3 Indicators: High level of participation in our non-academic leadership development programs, specifically our Club 56 program and Leaders in Training program. Club 56 students will complete regular service projects at a local assisted living facility and children's hospital. Teens in our Leaders in Training program will partner with the City Councilmember's to help shape local park improvements as part of a neighborhood-wide revitalization process.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Goal 1 Results:
    A. Improved Academics: Of the students that we were able to obtain grade reports from the beginning and end of the year:
    ● 75% saw grade improvements in at least one of their academic areas
    ● 50% saw grade improvements in two or more of their academic areas
    ● 25% saw grade improvements in three or more of their academic areas.
    ● 25% either had no change in their grades or saw a decrease over the academic year.

    B. Academic Self- Confidence and Enjoyment: KidzLit and KidzMath Pre and Post Tests:
    Elementary-aged students in our Evergreen after-school program reported increases in several areas of academic self-confidence and enjoyment over the academic year.
    As mentioned previously, the school environments of these children are not always positive, and they consistently receive a steady stream of “messages" that they are not smart, and this is often reflected in the grades they bring home to their parents. In fact, only 76% of students report that they like going to school. The GreenHouse works hard to build upon the academic strengths of these kids; and ongoing challenge when most of their parents are limited in their ability to help them with their school work because of language difference at home.

    Goal 2 Results: Using a variation of the "Developmental Assets" pre- and post-test survey using by youth development agencies around the world (The Me and My World Survey - Search Institute, 2015), we were able to point to some areas where our programs made a direct impact on students' lives. For example:
    ● For elementary students in our Evergreen after-school program, there was a 12% average increase (from 88% to 100%) over the academic year in the students saying they can “do something well", which is a 26% increase from this time last year.
    ● A 2% increase (to 96%) of students who self report that “I feel good about myself".
    ● 100% of students now say that they can “do great things with their lives", which is a 10% increase from this time last year.
    ● 96% of students report feeling safe at The GreenHouse and 96% report that “people are kind to me at The GreenHouse". Minor bullying being the complaint from the one student who reported not feeling safe, which is an issue that has since been addressed.
    ● 84% of elementary students report being “very productive" on their homework and academic enrichment activities at The GreenHouse, with 12% report being “kind of productive", and 4% report being “not very productive".

    It is significant to observe that students are self-reporting overall increases in their sense of self-confidence and enjoyment of math and reading, and a majority are seeing their grades improve, while at the same time reporting decreases in their enjoyment of going to school and whether they are receiving help to improve from their teachers.
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

We serve a specific neighborhood in the Gardenland/Northgate neighborhood of Sacramento, with over 550 kids living on one square block  - more kids per capita than any block in the greater Sacramento area. The youth of our neighborhood are susceptible to several risk factors, including: criminal activity, drug use, drug trafficking, gang affiliation, teen pregnancy, truancy, and apathy towards school. Some of the youth have already engaged in illegal activity and are on probation; some are teen moms or dads; some are failing their classes; some are using and selling drugs.

Social Media

Funding Needs

We are currently seeking funding for all programs (after-school tutoring, mentoring, teen youth group, leadership development team, and summer day camp).

Affiliations + Memberships

Christian Community Development Association - Member

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External Reviews

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Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

THE GREENHOUSE

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
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Executive Director

Mr. Brian C Heller de Leon

BIO

Brian holds a Masters in Theology from Fuller Theological Seminary and a BA in Human Development from U.C. San Diego. Brian's previous work experiences include student leadership development in the U.S. and Mexico, community organizing at the local and state level with the PICO National Network, and policy advocacy in the Capitol with the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice. Brian and his wife Christie have lived in the Tahoe Park neighborhood of Sacramento since 2006.

STATEMENT FROM THE Executive Director

"We serve a neighborhood with one of the highest concentrations of children in poverty in the Sacramento area. We operate out of an "Asset-Based Community Development" model where we build on the inherent dignity, strengths, and leadership gifts of families and youth for the purposes of community-wide transformation.

The GreenHouse is a non-profit, 501c3 organization located in the Gardenland Northgate neighborhood of Sacramento, California. We offer after-school tutoring, mentoring, spiritual development, and leadership development for under-resourced youth."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mike Downey

State Water Resources Control Board

Term: Feb 2012 - Jan 2018

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Race & Ethnicity
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.

Diversity Strategies
Yes
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
Yes
We use other methods to support diversity
Diversity notes from the nonprofit
As much as possible, we try to have a staff team and board of directors that reflects the demographics of the community we serve. This means hiring former GreenHouse youth that demonstrated strong leadership skills as staff members, and recruiting GreenHouse parents and GreenHouse "gradduates" from the neighborhood to serve on our board of directors.