Youth Development

Hope House

  • Washington, DC
  • www.hopehousedc.org

Mission Statement

Several years ago, as a part of the activities of the District of Columbia Control Board, Congress mandated that the District's Lorton Correctional Facility be closed, and all convicted District inmates be placed into federal custody by the end of 2001. At this time, approximately 8,000 inmates from Washington, D.C. are being housed in more than 50 federal, and one private prison located across the country. Hope House DC was founded to serve the needs of inmates who have been transferred to prisons far from the district, and their families. Hope House DC has three primary objectives: To create programs that enable inmates who are incarcerated in prisons far from home to strengthen ties with their families; To advocate for and raise the level of awareness among the general public about inmate issues and concerns; To create programs that assist the children and wives of D.C. prisoners in coping with separation from their loved ones, in the form of support groups and other projects.

Main Programs

  1. Connection Services
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

The primary focus of Hope House is to work with incarcerated fathers from the DC Metropolitan Area who are imprisoned in federal prisons.  While we target prisons with 100 or more DC area inmates, we provide services to anyone who is interested in participating in our programs.

ruling year

1998

Principal Officer

Self-reported

Ms. Carol Fennelly

Keywords

Self-reported

children of prisoners, incarcerated fathers, fathers in prison, family literacy, family support

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Also Known As

Hope House DC

EIN

31-1594625

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Services to Prisoners/Families (I43)

Humanities Organizations (A70)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Connection Services

To strengthen ties between inmates who are incarcerated in prisons far from home and their families Hope House DC runs a number of programs for prisoners and their families. Hope House DC sponsors 1. The Father to Child Reading Program. Prisoner fathers choose from children's books placed in several prisons, read from those books into an audio or video recorder, and then the books and the tapes are mailed home for the child to read while listening to their father's voice. 2. The Father to Child Teleconference Program uses live video teleconferencing to allow fathers incarcerated in a North Carolina prison to see and talk to their children in Washington using off-the-shelf technology. In order to participate, inmate fathers must have completed a parenting program offered by the prison. The children come to the Hope House office to talk to their fathers. 3. The Father to Child Summer Camp brings prisoners' children to week-long summer camps at prisons so that prisoners can spend quality time with their children in a supervised setting. 4.Hope House Moms and Kids Groups are support groups for children and mothers. The children get together for outings like skating, bowling, and other activities. While the mothers gather less frequently, most importantly, both groups come together in a setting that allows them to talk about the struggles of having a loved one in prison. 5 Peer Support Groups: Support groups are designed to address the isolation and social stigma experienced by the children, mothers, caregivers and others left behind by the imprisonment of a family member. 6 Pathways Program introduces our youth to a variety of professions, ranging from journalism, to medicine, culinary, production and design. 7 Outreach and Advocacy Program: This program informs the public about the issues faced by families of inmates. In the past these activities have included providing testimony before lawmakers; a publicly staged dramatic production designed to emphasize the difficulties faced by our families; presentations at conferences of policy-makers; and publication and public readings of poetry written by children of prisoners.

Category

Population(s) Served

Offenders/Ex-offenders

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

$222,801.00

Service Areas

Self-reported

National

The primary focus of Hope House is to work with incarcerated fathers from the DC Metropolitan Area who are imprisoned in federal prisons.  While we target prisons with 100 or more DC area inmates, we provide services to anyone who is interested in participating in our programs.

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

HOPE HOUSE
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Hope House

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
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  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
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Principal Officer

Ms. Carol Fennelly

BIO

Carol Fennelly, a long-time activist, is Director of Hope House. For seventeen years Carol lived and worked at the homeless shelters operated by the Community for Creative Non-Violence. In that capacity she was responsible for the creation of numerous new programs within the organization, including a drop-in center for homeless people, a medical infirmary for 30 homeless men, and recruitment and overall coordination of seven separate organizations which provided services in the 1400 bed Federal City Shelter. Carol is the architect of the Districts "cooling centers" which have saved lives by providing cool places for indigent people during extremely hot weather. She is founder and president of the Trust for Affordable Housing which built over 350 units of Single Room Occupancy Housing for single homeless people in the District of Columbia. In addition, her reputation as an outspoken and effective advocate on issues of concern to homeless people is well known. Along with her late husband Mitch Snyder she designed campaigns which won voting rights for homeless people; won passage of the Stewert B. McKinney bill; won passage of the D.C. Right to Overnight Shelter Act; brought a quarter million people to Washington for the Housing Now! march in 1989; and acquired the old Federal City College along with $13 million in renovation funds to create a model shelter in the nation's capitol. Carol is a long time political commentator for local public radio. She founded Hope House after spending almost a year writing about the plight of families torn apart by the closure of Lorton Prison. Carol has been honored with numerous awards for her work with poor and dispossessed people.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

William Hamilton

Fenton Communications

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?