Educational Institutions

San Diego Council on Literacy

  • San Diego, CA
  • www.literacysandiego.org

Mission Statement

The mission of the San Diego Council on Literacy is to unite the community to support literacy through advocacy, partnerships, resources, and coordination.

This organization is San Diego County's literacy coalition. It operates on a countywide level with broad support to its network of 30 affiliated youth, adult, and family literacy programs. It provides support that meets the following common needs of these programs:

AWARENESS
ADVOCACY
ACCOUNTABILITY (research/statistics/data/metrics)
COORDINATION
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Conference sponsorships, presentations, consulting
RESOURCES: Books, supplies, equipment, materials
SERVICES: Programming/Initiatives/Referral

Through it's Literacy Infusion Projects, the SDCOL works on targeted community levels or in support of the literacy needs of individual cities in the San Diego region. Currently, the SDCOL is leading a concentrated literacy infusion effort in El Cajon ( a city in San Diego County) while supporting related efforts in City Heights, Linda Vista, and the Diamond Community.

Main Programs

  1. Program 1
  2. Literacy Infusion Projects
  3. Literacy Referral Services
  4. Literacy Awareness Program
  5. Health Literacy San Diego
  6. Convening the Affiliated Literacy Programs of San Diego
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Service is provided throughout San Diego County, in smaller regions, and in individual cities.

As relates to future Literacy Infusion Projects, the SDCOL aspires to lead projects in National City, Barrio Logan, Logan Heights, Sherman Heights, and Golden Hill. Initial work and partnership were conducted later last year for the latter four communities listed here.

ruling year

1996

Chief Executive Officer since 2006

Self-reported

Mr. Jose L. Cruz

Keywords

Self-reported

literacy, coalition, tutoring, reading, ESL, education, GED preparation

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013.
Register now

EIN

33-0390376

 Number

1307198813

Physical Address

2515 Camino del Rio South Suite 125

San Diego, 92108

Also Known As

SDCOL

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Education N.E.C. (B99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Our mission is to unite the community to support literacy through advocacy, partnerships, resources, and coordination. We have taken this mission, and our related goals, with our business model, and applied all, not just at a countywide level, but for smaller, targeted communities. Our feature program, Literacy Infusion Projects, challenges us to recreate the San Diego Council on Literacy and produce literacy campaigns in individual cities or in smaller communities. In our business model, we cite data, awareness, advocacy, and resource development as foundations for effective application of our six interventions. These are tagged with baselines and pre-stated outcome measurements. We are in various phases of this work and are waiting to see documented outcomes from our efforts. For now, we are implementing our plans on schedule and with signs of progress and productivity that are encouraging. A good amount of our work requires that we establish formal relationships to make official our shared, defined work with new partners. In another six months, we will have more to report that is specific in terms of outputs and outcomes.


Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

San Diego Council on Literacy services include: volunteer tutor recruitment, learner recruitment, free books, speaker's bureau, outreach activities and events, retreats, networking meetings, eye care fund, learner conference, tutor conference support, and we consider a variety of other requests made by literacy programs.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Program 2

Literacy Infusion Projects


In addition to its countywide coordination of literacy services in the San Diego region with its 30 affiliated literacy programs, the San Diego Council on Literacy is targeting smaller communities and individual cities that, for decades, have experienced high rates of illiteracy, cycles of dysfunction, and cycles of dependency. By creating partnerships with non-literacy organizations and organizing the affiliated literacy programs that are already serving targeted communities, we are intensifying the application of our resources and interventions in ways that address, not just literacy issues, but family stability issues that affect literacy skill acquisition. Through this approach, the SDCOL is able to strategically access resources that address obstacles to learning (lack of food, clothing, shelter, childcare, transportation, and response to mental health needs), while being a resource to non-literacy organizations whose services to clients become more effective and lasting with the greater use of literacy programming and related services. This focus on smaller service areas is proving to be effective because resources are being directed to where they are most needed and creating better access to services for those who need help. This approach allows for easier documentation of outcomes that are coming as a result of applied services and interventions.

The cost of serving each community over a three-year period is $99,000 or $33,000 annually. We aspire to reach 2-3 communities per year. Currently, we are focused on the City of El Cajon, with our eyes on efforts for National City, Barrio Logan, Logan Heights, Sherman Heights, and Golden Hill. In our efforts, we are offering five Interventions:

1. Literacy Infusion Projects. The essence is creating partnerships with an emphasis on literacy and family stability. We are, first, creating greater visibility to literacy services by branding/promoting the literacy service network in each community. In El Cajon, we call it the "El Cajon Literacy Network" which is made up of the nine diverse service programs that serve that city.

Ultimately, it is our aim to leave each community after having produced a "San Diego Council on Literacy" in that community, ultimately, to be supported by city leadership and the residents.

2. Awareness activity that enhances access to literacy services. We have established contacts and relationships with the El Cajon Collaborative and Chaldean & Middle Eastern Social Services (now working under the auspices of the San Ysidro Health Centers), so that we can focus service promotions to residents who are low-income and/or immigrants/refugees.

3. Awareness activity that results in more volunteers tutoring children who need help or in helping adults who have requested literacy services. We are recruiting volunteers in communities of need and in surrounding communities. This resource will result in more one-on-one instruction, more students working at their own pace, their own starting place, and receiving support to meet their specific needs.

4. Summer Book Giveaways: Through this effort, we are responding to what happens to low-income children during the summer months. Right before summer break, we are giving books to children, ages 4-8, in targeted schools, so that they have books to read during break. This year, our first year of book giveaways, we gave 1,841 books to 577 El Cajon children. The children were allowed to self-select books and keep the books that they received. Over three summers this effort will prevent "summer slide" from affecting our targeted children population. In short, without interventions, low-income children (62% who have no books at home) who are already at-risk to not emerge as readers, will lose the reading skills they acquired during the school year because they do not have books, do not travel, are not read to, and have not developed good reading habits that include visits to libraries. It is here where we are applying a vital intervention.

In 2017, in El Cajon alone, we will give away approximately 5,200 books to 2,400 children, ages 5-8. It is at these ages where we can be the most impactful. It is unfortunate that children over the age of 8 who are not reading at grade-level by the end of 3rd grade, only have a 25% chance of ever reading at a level that aides them as students and in their future careers.

5. Book Repository: We are engaging with community partners to coordinate collection of books for children. The books will be new or like-new and will be made available in strategic locations so that they can be accessed by children, agencies, and teachers. In El Cajon, the El Cajon Valley Host Lions Club is taking a lead role in this effort.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Budget

33,000

Program 3

Literacy Referral Services

The San Diego Council on Literacy serves as the hub for the literacy effort in the San Diego region. It maintains a database of literacy service programs in the region that offer no cost literacy services to families, adults, and children in the region. It also offers volunteer opportunities to individuals who would like to tutor a child or adult or read to children. The public is directed to call the literacy referral line (888-850-READ [7323]) to help or be helped. Many clients prefer to access the SDCOL website, www.literacysandiego.org to self-refer. The network of 30 SDCOL affiliated programs currently serves, annually, 170,000 residents of all ages.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

$5,000

Program 4

Literacy Awareness Program

There are five SDCOL priorities:
1. Defining the State of Literacy in the region (Data/Metrics)
2. Instilling the Importance of literacy in the community (Awareness)
3. Filling service gaps through resources and initiatives
4. Enhancing the availability and quality of literacy services per region, city, and communities through coordinated efforts
5. Generating resources that support literacy services/programming/initiatives

As a first step, the SDCOL calculates the state of literacy in the region and shares this information with the public. This helps to instill among the general public the importance of literacy in our communities. By raising literacy awareness that is data-supported, the SDCOL is able to produce the following outcomes:

1. Instill the importance of literacy in the community
2. Promote the availability of services
2. Promote the availability of volunteer opportunities
3. Create partnerships and produce advocates
4. Reach the philanthropic community and secure funding that supports programming

We rely upon professional marketing and public relations services to raise literacy awareness and to lead the public to action. These services are ongoing and require funding to assure that the SDCOL is reaching diverse audiences...through traditional media and social media, so that people who want services, or people who want to contribute to solutions, know who to contact.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

$12,000

Program 5

Health Literacy San Diego

Health Literacy San Diego is a collaborative effort among Community Health Improvement Partners (CHIP) and the San Diego Council on Literacy (SDCOL). Our work is based on When Words Get in the Way: A Collaborative Plan to Address Health Literacy in San Diego County. This report serves as the statement of need for our project and outlines a health literacy plan for San Diego County. This report was recently followed by an updated report called, Improving Health Communications: A Collaborative Plan to Address Health Literacy in San Diego County.

Through Health Literacy San Diego, we are providing trainings and other resources that help the community respond to the communication breakdowns that take place when patient languages, cultures, and literacy abilities meet the language, culture, and literature that comes from the healthcare community.

The Health Literacy San Diego taskforce has been hands-on in designing and providing trainings to healthcare professionals and in producing materials for patients who are limited English proficient, possess only low-level literacy skills, or are seniors, all who may be challenged by the need to navigate the healthcare system and by the exchange of information between patients and their healthcare service providers.

While. as a team,we are responding to requests for services, especially trainings, our immediate need is for the hiring of a health literacy coordinator.

Category

Health Care

Population(s) Served

Budget

$50,000

Program 6

Convening the Affiliated Literacy Programs of San Diego

An often understated role of the San Diego Council on Literacy is its success in uniting and regularly convening its network of 30 affiliated literacy program partners. These programs have met, every other month, for the past 30 years. It is the role of the SDCOL to support the individual and collective work of these affiliated programs. Together, they annually serve 170,000 residents of all ages, at no cost.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

$300,000

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    GOALS (subject to revision per service year)
    -Documenting the state of literacy in the San Diego region
    -Documenting outcomes from the services that are provided
    -Instilling the importance of literacy in the region
    -Increasing impact of services through city/community-scaled efforts
    -Filling services gaps via initiatives & support to the affiliated service programs
    -Generating resources and raising funds that support SDCOL priorities

    GOAL 1: Documenting the state of literacy in the San Diego region (Data)
    Objective: Produce a repository of data and statistics to document the state of literacy in the San Diego region

    GOAL 2: Documenting outcomes from services provided by the Affiliated Literacy Programs (Metrics)
    Objective: Produce documentation that shows numerically and anecdotally the outcomes that the Affiliated Programs are producing through services/literacy instruction.

    GOAL 3: Instilling the importance of literacy in the region (Marketing/Awareness)
    Objective A: Increase quality use of Facebook, Twitter, Website, and media, to produce referrals & increase events attendance by 20%.
    Objective B: Increase literacy volunteerism by 20%
    Objective C: Support growth of advocacy efforts related to low health literacy

    GOAL 4: Increasing impact of services through city coordinated or community coordinated efforts (Coordination)
    Objective A: Show 15% increase in service enrollments where the SDCOL has initiated or participated in city coordinated or community coordinated service efforts (Multi-year) Metric: Volunteers recruited/Volunteer hours
    i. Data reports/Repository
    ii. Partnerships secured
    Objective B: Increase engagement in and provide support for coordinated efforts; produce outcomes that are responsive to SDCOL priorities and roles

    GOAL 5: Filling services gaps (support to the affiliated programs)
    Objective A: Show 95% (maximum) response to the individual needs and collective priorities of the SDCOL Affiliated Programs.
    Objective B: Increase literacy volunteerism by 20% (see Goal 3. Objective B)

    GOAL 6: Raising funds to support SDCOL priorities (Development)
    (Proposals, Campaigns, Sponsorships)

  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Strategies...
    -Producing a repository of data and statistics to document the state of literacy in the San Diego region by conducting general research, accessing national literacy studies, recording results from Smarter Balanced and other measures of youth success in school, and extrapolating from the U.S. Census and other sources in combination with national literacy studies.

    -Documenting outcomes from services provided by the Affiliated Literacy Programs by accessing data collection portals from the Calfornia Department of Education and collecting individual learner progress reports from each of the affiliated programs.

    -Producing documentation that shows numerically and anecdotally the outcomes that the Affiliated Programs are producing through services/literacy instruction by packaging collected data and learner progress information as well as presenting testimonials from students. This information is being collected for publication that supports awareness, advocacy, and development.

    -Increasing quality use of Facebook, Twitter, Website, and media, to produce referrals & increase events attendance by securing professional support. In past years, funds budgeted for this purpose were minimal. This has changed.
    -Increasing literacy volunteerism by using professional services that promote volunteer opportunities.

    -Supporting growth of advocacy efforts related to low health literacy by continuing to convene with the Health Literacy San Diego taskforce, present trainings to healthcare professionals, promote use of healthcare instructional materials by adults who are low-literate, do not speak English as a first language, or are seniors. The taskforce also aims to hire a health literacy coordinator.

    -Increasing impact of services through city coordinated or community coordinated efforts by initiating these efforts or engaging in pre-existing similar efforts.

    -Showing increase in service enrollments where the SDCOL has initiated or participated in city coordinated or community coordinated service efforts through reports/Repository, partnerships secured/MOUs. We will do this by referencing our baselines and comparing these to service outcomes after one year of applying our interventions to these communities.

    -Increasing engagement in and providing support for coordinated efforts by producing outcomes that are responsive to SDCOL priorities and roles by creating relationships with non-literacy organizations, securing MOUs so that relationships and commitments are formalized, and providing services to these agencies to increase their use of literacy as a service tool.

    -Being responsive to the individual and collective priorities of the SDCOL Affiliated Programs by attending meetings of the affiliated programs, visiting with each program individually, and surveying programs about their needs.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Our CEO comes has 31 years experience in the literacy field and 28 years of experience in the nonprofit arena. He currently serves on the board of directors of ProLiteracy, the largest literacy organization in the world. He is the former president of the National Alliance of Urban Literacy Coalitions (no longer existing.) He is recognized nationally as a leader in the U.S. literacy initiative. His experience is an asset that helps to guide the SDCOL's work as a literacy coalition.

    The staff is a small one, consisting of four members who, combined, are equal to approximately 2.1 positions. Our aim and plan in the next nine months is to increase our staffing from 2.1 to 3.0 FTEs. The staff size is more symbolic of what took place with virtually all nonprofit organizations when the economy took in 2008. This economic environment affected the organization for four years and, while it continued to provide services that are consistent with its main function, there was little taking place with the organization that was expansive or innovative.

    Last year, and since, a number of changes occurred. A new business plan with fresh ideas emerged. The best of these ideas were inspired by the idea of collective impact. The SDCOL launched its own version of this framework that is well-known in literacy coalition circles: Literacy Infusion. The difference is that, instead of operating as a countywide organization, the SDCOLhas looked at how it could address the needs of the community's most needed cities. We found that El Cajon was identified as the region's poorest city. We targeted this city for our first attempt at implementing our literacy infusion concept and interventions.

    We hired a field coordinator with data collection experience and experience in nonprofit organization's and related field work. This adjustment to our staffing structure has freed up the CEO to spend more time on resource development and other CEO work...versus the role he had played in previous years, essentially performing as the organization's service provider expert.

    With this change, and with the inclination on the part of the 30 affiliated programs of the San Diego Council on Literacy to work together in our smaller literacy infusion efforts, we have succeeded in taking our staffing resources to strategically coordinate literacy efforts where they are most needed and in a concentrated way. We would like to engage in more of these efforts and plan to do so as we generate the funding and other resources that are needed for us to work successfully. In short, our organization's capabilities for carrying out our strategies are good and getting growing. We will continue to be dependent upon the philanthropic community to fund our programming. We see already that the our new (Literacy Infusion Projects) programming has greater appeal from donors.

  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    In El Cajon, we have surveyed the nine affiliated literacy programs that are providing services there. We know how many students they are serving and how many volunteers they are engaging in instruction. We also know the school scores of the children, ages 5-8, who we are targeting with our interventions. We will compare baselines and past numbers with updated numbers after one year.

    Here are our indicators:

    1. Improvement of language arts scores for children, ages 5-8, based on Smart Balanced/Common Core scores per school year.
    2. Survey of literacy programs to ascertain the extent of progress attained by adult students based upon CASAS assessment tool (Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System) for the CA Dept. of Education.
    3. Use of a Lexile-based tool to survey adult students and children on the extent of their progress in reading (see Total Reader, Scholastic Reading Inventory, etc.)

    OTHER/OUTPUTS
    1. Number of adult students being served.
    2. Number of volunteers providing instruction to adults and children.
    3. Number of books distributed to children for home libraries.
    4. Number of MOUs secured to document the extent of partnerships secured for Literacy Infusion Projects to address family stability issues and support literacy skill acquisition.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    In this first year of our literacy infusion project in El Cajon, we are not deeming what we are doing as being "unaccomplished." We are on schedule, and ouu commitment to El Cajon is for three-years. We are finishing our first year of work there. Our field coordinator has been on staff for almost two months. And we have hired a new office coordinator.

    In the spirit of the question, our long-term need, and biggest challenge, is producing relationships and securing partnerships that result in non-literacy organizations accessing the services that we will provide to them and that will help them succeed in their work with clients. We have to succeed in getting more agencies and their personnel to look beyond the short-term. They can do this by allowing us to share the following resources:

    --Referral Training: Who to refer, how to refer, and where to refer clients who need help with reading
    --Producing agency literature, signage, bulletin boards that are readable to clients who possess only minimal literacy skills
    --Using books for children and family reading time to respond to family stability issues
    --How to teach: The Teach-Back Method and Three Steps to Teaching (shades of health literacy communication techniques)

    We also have the challenge of branding the "El Cajon Literacy Network" so that it becomes a known entity to the residents of El Cajon.

    Relationship building and branding take time and we are committed to investing time and resources that produce the results that we want:

    1. Better student scores in language arts, especially for the lowest achieving schools in El Cajon and the poorest children;
    2. An increase in reading skills and English language acquisition for more El Cajon adults;
    3. More adult students being served;
    4. More volunteers to tutor children and adults;
    5. More books for children, parents, and teachers.
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Service is provided throughout San Diego County, in smaller regions, and in individual cities.

As relates to future Literacy Infusion Projects, the SDCOL aspires to lead projects in National City, Barrio Logan, Logan Heights, Sherman Heights, and Golden Hill. Initial work and partnership were conducted later last year for the latter four communities listed here.

Social Media

Funding Needs

Our people are our programs and services. And we have program costs. 1. Programs: Costs are per communities targeted for Literacy Infusion Projects 2. Staffing for programming/services 3. Operations/Associated Costs

Affiliations + Memberships

United Way Member Agency

Videos

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

San Diego Council on Literacy
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

Sign in or create an account to view this information

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

San Diego Council on Literacy

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Jose L. Cruz

BIO

Jose Cruz is the chief executive officer for the San Diego Council on Literacy, a model urban literacy coalition. In total, he has 31 years experience in the area of literacy. In 2006 he completed a one-year assignment as the first executive director for the Southern California Library Literacy Network, and served for three years as the statewide director of coalition and member development for California Literacy (from 2002 to 2005.) He worked for 14 years as the associate director for the San Diego Council on Literacy, between 1988 and 2002. He is known in the national literacy network for his accomplishments in coalition building, having provided leadership for successful cooperative literacy efforts on a local, regional, and statewide basis. He is the recipient of the 2003 San Diego Union-Tribune, "Educator of the Year" award, and served as president of Rolling Readers USA, the National Alliance of Urban Literacy Coalitions, and the San Diego Branch of the International Dyslexia Association. He is a two-time recipient of the International Reading Association's "Celebrate Literacy Award." In 2007, KPBS and Union Bank named him the "Local Hero of the Year" in the Education Category for Hispanic Heritage Month. In 2014, he was recognized by The San Diego Union-Tribune as the "Civic Leader of the Year" via the San Diego Latino Champion Awards. In 2015, he was named to the San Diego High School, "Wall of Honor." He is a native San Diegan and a member of the Downtown San Diego Lions Club. He is also vice-chair on the board of directors of ProLiteracy, the largest literacy organization in the world.

STATEMENT FROM THE Chief Executive Officer

"For 30 years, since 1986, the San Diego Council on Literacy has remained strong as the banner, handle, umbrella, and coordinator of the region's literacy effort. It has evolved over four decades and takes pride in refining its priorities and services in response to community needs and emerging best practices. This willingness to change has earned respect for the SDCOL from the national literacy community.

The recent emergence of "collective impact" as a service framework has reinforced for nonprofit organizations the importance of working in partnerships and committing to work with important representatives from different sectors to a common agenda for "solving a specific social problem." By "using a centralized infrastructure, a dedicated staff, and a structured process that leads to a common agenda, shared measurement, continuous communication, and mutually reinforcing activities among all participants" we can come to lasting solutions to long-time social issues. The collective impact framework has contributed to the SDCOL's current literacy infusion model. The literacy infusion model, which is less rigid and demanding than the collective impact framework, is also ideal for literacy coalitions, and is recommended by Literacy Powerline and other national experts in literacy coalition work.

The field and donors are calling for collaborations. The SDCOL is a known entity in the community with a reputation for success in uniting, not just the literacy service community, but other partners from diverse causes, towards greater literacy, and, more so in its new era, towards interventions that will be more effective in producing enhanced quality of life for San Diego County residents."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Michael Leake

Sheppard Mullin

Term: July 2016 - June 2017

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
Yes
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity