Public, Society Benefit

National Conflict Resolution Center

  • San Diego, CA
  • www.ncrconline.com

Mission Statement

We provide the resources, training and expertise to help people, organizations and communities manage and solve conflicts, with civility.

Main Programs

  1. Campus Civility
  2. Avoiding the Pipeline to Prison
  3. Empowering People
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

NCRC is based in San Diego, CA with trainers throughout the nation. We are also available for training in other countries.

ruling year

1995

President

Self-reported

Mr. Steven P. Dinkin

Keywords

Self-reported

mediation, mediation training, conflict resolution, facilitation, training, ADR, family, communication coaching, mediate, NCRC, restorative justice

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013.
Register now

EIN

33-0433314

 Number

6137936736

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Committed to building a more civil society for over 30 years, the National Conflict Resolution Center (NCRC) touches the lives of thousands of people every year, including some of the most vulnerable. During the 2014-2015 fiscal year, NCRC reached over 6,000 people through dispute resolution services, mediations and trainings at sites in U.S., Europe, and Mexico.
On March 12, 2015, over 450 people gathered to attend the 27th Annual Peacemaker Awards dinner, where awards were given to the University of California President Janet Napolitano and San Diego Unified School District Superintendent Cindy Marten. Each spring since 1989, NCRC has presented the Peacemaker Awards to promote the concept of peaceful conflict resolution through dialogue and collaboration. Awards have gone to a broad range of individuals and organizations. Many are well known - elected officials, a university president, and the Mexican consul. Others are relatively unsung, such as the tattoo parlor owners who removed gang tattoos as a community service. All recipients are leaders in finding creative solutions for compelling current conflicts. This event continues to prove that although conflict can be painful and destructive, it also brings opportunities for growth though improved understanding and insight.
Through all of NCRC's growth, the focus has never drifted away from our roots in the community. With community outreach, education and training, NCRC seeks to help build a more civil society by provi

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Campus Civility

The Galinson Campus Civility Program is shaping the next generation’s leaders. Being part of an extraordinarily diverse
student population represents a challenge and an opportunity.
When students have misconceptions of those outside their group
it can be difficult to communicate. Through communication and
diversity training, the Campus Civility Program bolsters the
students’ ability and confidence to engage with others.

In 2011, the National Conflict Resolution Center (NCRC) began
working with California State University, San Marcos to provide
civility training campus-wide. Named in honor of community
leaders and NCRC advocates Murray and Elaine Galinson, the
program now commands the personal and financial support of UC
San Diego Chancellor Pradeep Khosla, San Diego State University
President Elliot Hirshman, and Constance Carroll, Chancellor of the
San Diego Community College District. More than 3,600 students
will participate in this training during the 2015 – 2016 academic
year.

Category

Public, Society Benefit

Population(s) Served

Young Adults (20-25 years) -- currently not in use

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

2,500,000

Program 2

Avoiding the Pipeline to Prison

The Pipeline to Prison refers to the policies and practices that
push the nation’s youth, especially ethnic and racial minorities, out
of the classrooms through suspension and expulsion, and onto the
streets, leading them all too often into the juvenile and criminal
justice systems. It also includes those youth who enter the juvenile
justice system as a result of a criminal act. NCRC interrupts this
pipeline, redirecting young people to productive and positive life
paths. It helps them understand the impact of their actions and
allows them to make appropriate restitution.

Category

Public, Society Benefit

Population(s) Served

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

4,500,000

Program 3

Empowering People

The National Conflict Resolution Center’s (NCRC) Empowerment
program teaches the skills necessary for effective communication,
conflict management, and self-sufficiency to some of the most
vulnerable members of the San Diego community, including
refugees, the homeless, foster youth and veterans. Through
customized communication and conflict management training,
NCRC helps individuals from these groups become productive
community members. NCRC has a track record of success in this
area, training over 3,000 at-risk individuals during the past four
years.

Category

Public, Society Benefit

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

None

Budget

3,000,000

Service Areas

Self-reported

National

NCRC is based in San Diego, CA with trainers throughout the nation. We are also available for training in other countries.

Social Media

Funding Needs

NCRC needs your help to continue providing services to individuals in underserved communities. As a non-profit organization, NCRC depends on donations to help fund many of our programs. Your philanthropic support will make an enormous difference. It will help NCRC shift cultures through integrated training and services that move people, organizations and communities from conflict to civility. A gift to NCRC will help us address, discuss, and solve critical issues in a manner that creates community, inclusion, and support. Examples of those most in need of your support include: - Refugees - Veterans - Homeless - College students - Troubled teens - Members of underserved communities NCRC's impact is deep, life changing, and far reaching. The only limit to the services NCRC provides is the philanthropic support we receive. The partnerships we create with our donors enable community change. For more information, please contact Jim Forbes, Development Director at (619) 238-2400 x229 or via email jforbes@ncrconline.com.

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

National Conflict Resolution Center
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

Sign in or create an account to view this information

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

National Conflict Resolution Center

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

President

Mr. Steven P. Dinkin

BIO

Steven Dinkin, Esq. (President) has directed NCRC since 2003. At NCRC he has spearheaded the effort to establish national standards for mediation training; secured a major national contract with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to provide trainers and mediators for TSA's Model Workplace Program; and laid the groundwork for a cross-border initiative to bring mediation training and services to Baja, California. Before arriving at NCRC, Mr. Dinkin was Program Director at the Center for Dispute Settlement (CDS) where he designed and established the Community Dispute Resolution Center of Washington D.C., which handled a Community Misdemeanor Mediation program with the D.C. Office of the U.S. Attorney; Youth Mediation, a juvenile delinquent program; and, a Police Office/Citizen Mediation Program. He also mediated workplace and employment cases under contract with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Federal Reserve System and the Office of Compliance (an independent office in the legislative branch of the federal government, engaged in resolving workplace disputes within the House of Representatives, the Senate and other congressional offices). In addition to his work at CDS, Mr. Dinkin was an Adjunct Law Professor at George Washington University where he taught a mediation clinic; President of the D.C. Chapter of the Association for Conflict Resolution; and, Chair of the D.C. Bar Litigation Section, Alternative Dispute Resolution Committee. He currently serves on the board of the California Dispute Resolution Council. Mr. Dinkin earned his J.D. from George Washington University Law School.

STATEMENT FROM THE President

""If there is to be peace in the world, there must be peace in the nations. If there is to be peace in the nations, there must be peace in the cities. If there is to be peace in the cities, there must be peace between neighbors. If there is to be peace between neighbors, there must be peace in the home. If there is to be peace in the home, there must be peace in the heart." -Lao-tse, 6th century

The ancient quote from Lao-tse speaks of man's continuing search for peace at all levels of life and the reality that peace or discord on one level of human activity affects all others. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. referred to this connection when he wrote in "Letters from a Birmingham Jail" that, "All humans are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” At the National Conflict Resolution Center (NCRC), these words inspire is our vision—one of conflict management that bridges all communications from the grassroots level to the highest strata of international diplomacy. We focus on providing the tools and expertise that people need to handle conflicts with respect, skill, and creativity. Since we opened our doors over 30 years ago, NCRC has trained thousands of mediators and resolved tens of thousands of disputes through collaborative conflict resolution. The ripple effect of these efforts is immeasurable, reaching countless people in all walks of life around the world. This is only the beginning. Recent events at the local, national, and international level underscore all too vividly the reality that conflicts bring out the best and the worst in us. We will never rid the world of conflict, nor is that our goal. Our goal is, to give people everywhere the tools they need to move through conflict with hope and dignity and to get on with the business of living life in all its fullness."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Thomas W Turner Jr.

Managing Partner, Procopio, Cory, Hargreaves & Savitch, LLP

Term: Dec 2009 - Dec 2017

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.
Race & Ethnicity
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.
Middle Eastern
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Diversity Strategies
No
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity