Arts, Culture, and Humanities

The San Diego Archaeological Center

  • Escondido, CA
  • www.sandiegoarchaeology.org

Mission Statement

The mission of the San Diego Archaeological Center is to preserve archaeological collections and promote their educational, scientific and cultural use to benefit a diverse public.

Main Programs

  1. Project Archaeology
  2. Curatorial and Research
  3. Exhibition
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

The San Diego Archaeological Center provides programming throughout San Diego County. The Center's 11,000 square foot facility is located in the northern part of San Diego County, but provides extensive off-site programing, including exhibits in public venues, educational programs for all age groups and participates in community events. This year, visitor surveys reveal 61% of the general visitors are local San Diego County residents, 19% are from other California counties, and 16% are from other states and 4% from other countries.

ruling year

1995

Principal Officer since 1998

Self-reported

Cindy Stankowski

Keywords

Self-reported

archaeology, curation, Native American, history, archeology

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EIN

33-0574573

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Museum & Museum Activities (A50)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

FY12-13 Accomplishments Outreach: The Center served over 48,000 people this year, including 3,050 museum visitors, we provided educational programming for 2,928 K-12 students and 2,032 adults, and installed five off-site exhibits at public venues. Education: The Center's received a $12,500 grant from SDG&E Eco Ambassadors program to provide a new K-12 educational program: Today's Trash is Tomorrow's Archaeology. Participants received a free reusable water bottle if they promised to use it for at least six months. In FY12-13, 1,019 children attended a Today's Trash program. Community volunteers donated 1,013 hours to educational programming. Exhibition The Center collaborated with a 6th grade teacher at High Tech Middle Media Arts School on a large scale project titled, "We Dig Archaeology: An Education Program for Kids by Kids". This project involved fifty-two 6th grade students working to develop educational activities and exhibits for other children. We installed a large-scale exhibit about grinding stone tools, featuring enigmatic ""donut stones."" Curatorial and Research: The Center curates 853 archaeological collections, more than 4,200 cubic feet of artifacts. In September 2013, the Center received a research grant to bring an international team to San Diego to study bedrock and boulder features, including aerial drone mapping and 3-D digital modeling. The results will help place the local archaeology in a global context. Interns from 12 different institutions invested 4,048 hours in curatorial and research projects. FY13-14 Goals Governance: We want to expand the Board of Trustees to include people with expertise in marketing, garnering corporate support and strategic planning. Finances: We want increase revenue by expanding education programming and providing curation services outside of the region. Facility: We will be expanding the floor space of the gift shop and the exhibition area by converting an office.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Project Archaeology

Project Archaeology (PA) is an educational program geared primarily for third through seventh graders in formal and informal venues. PA gives students a basic understanding of how archaeology works and teaches them to respect and protect our nation's rich cultural heritage. PA is an interdisciplinary and cost effective, program, meeting and exceeding many of the state requirements for student educational content in history and social science, English and language, mathematics, life and earth science and visual and performing arts. During each program, students excavate an assemblage of artifacts from our sand-filled ""dig bins"" and as a team, analyze the collections, pose and test hypotheses about the meaning and use of the collection and relate a story of what happened at the site. A significant amount of time is spent advocating the protection of historical and archaeological sites, as ""pot-hunting"" is an increasingly common problem in the Western states.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Other Named Groups

Budget

$45,000

Program 2

Curatorial and Research

The Center currently curates 836 collections, representing 2,178 archaeological sites—the largest collection of its kind in San Diego County. These artifacts represent 10,000 years of regional history represent the cultural diversity that has always been a part of regional history. The Center is one of the few repositories accepting archaeological collections in California. Our research projects have focused on integrating local archaeological artifacts with the history of humanity globally. The Center meets the requirements set forth in Federal regulations for Curation of Federally-Owned and Administered Archaeological Collections (36 CFR Part 79) and State of California Guidelines for the Curation of Archaeological Collections. The Center is the only qualified archaeological repository for Federal archaeological collections in Southern California, and is the designated repository for local government agencies.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

180,000

Program 3

Exhibition

The goals of the Center's Exhibition Program are to: To incorporate research, public accessibility and partnerships into exhibit selection and presentation To maximize community impact and Center visibility for a broad and diverse audience To make the Center's collections and research available to the public The Center has permanent exhibits providing an introduction to the 10,000 years of cultural history in San Diego County, information about the process of archaeology and the science behind the study of the past. We feature two to three changing exhibits throughout the on topics of interest, new acquisitions and exhibits curated by staff and interns.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

15,000

Service Areas

Self-reported

California

The San Diego Archaeological Center provides programming throughout San Diego County. The Center's 11,000 square foot facility is located in the northern part of San Diego County, but provides extensive off-site programing, including exhibits in public venues, educational programs for all age groups and participates in community events. This year, visitor surveys reveal 61% of the general visitors are local San Diego County residents, 19% are from other California counties, and 16% are from other states and 4% from other countries.

Funding Needs

The Center's most pressing needs are: Start-up funding for the Archaeologist for a Day Program: $75,000 for site preparation, landscaping and a shade structure. We would like to expand our board to include people with expertise in marketing, garnering corporate support and strategic planning. Educational Program Support: $75,000 to expand programming with additional staff. Curatorial and Research Support: $80,000 for additional staff, collections management supplies and equipment. Facility Support: $50,000 to replace our aging flooring with stained concrete.

Accreditations

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

San Diego Archaeological Center
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

The San Diego Archaeological Center

Leadership

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Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone and website
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Cindy Stankowski

BIO

Cindy Stankowski, Center Director, received a Bachelor's degree summa cum laude in Anthropology from San Diego State University and a Master's degree in Museum Studies from San Francisco State University. She has been with the San Diego Archaeological Center since 1996, leading the effort to preserve our archaeological legacy. She brings an understanding of curation issues and museum management to the Center and has led symposia on curation throughout the state. She also seeks new and innovative ways for the public to connect with the past, including exhibits, seminars and school presentations.

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

"Cindy Stankowski, Executive DirectorArchaeology is the study of artifacts and sites to learn how people lived in the past. Archaeology reinforces the concept of a shared human heritage and provides modern people with perspectives on their own place and time in history. Science, history and imagination help reveal the story of every artifact and the people who used them. Regardless of where we live or how we make our living today, all humans share a common past: our ancestors were all hunters and gatherers. For more than two million years, all humans lived in small-scale societies, moving frequently and relying on wild food resources. It was not until about 12,000 years ago (less than 1% of human history) that plants and animals were domesticated in some parts of the world, allowing a moresettled lifestyle based on farming and greater population densities."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Robert P Case

Archaeologist, Historian

Term: Aug 2013 - July 2015

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?