Human Services

College Now Greater Cleveland, Inc.

  • Cleveland, OH
  • www.collegenowgc.org

Mission Statement

College Now Greater Cleveland’s mission is to increase college attainment through college access and college success advising; financial aid counseling; and scholarship and retention services. We envision a future in which all members of our community will have the support they need to successfully complete their postsecondary education, lead more satisfying and productive lives and contribute to the region’s economic vitality.

Main Programs

  1. College Access Advising, Financial Aid Counseling, Scholarships & Retention Services
Service Areas

Self-reported

Ohio

11 counties in the Northeast Ohio region (Ashtabula, Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, Lorain, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit and Trumbull), with the majority of clients residing in Cuyahoga County.

ruling year

1967

Principal Officer since 2010

Self-reported

Ms. Lee A. Friedman

Keywords

Self-reported

college, college access, education, scholarship, cleveland, workforce development, opportunity, high school, adult student, middle school, financial aid

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EIN

34-6580096

 Number

8430954295

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Our scope and successes are significant:        *There are currently 10,000 students on college campuses in Ohio and across the nation who have received College Now advising services and scholarships.  *Those students have benefitted from more than $150 million in financial aid, a significant return on investment.

       *For a graduating high school senior, a $500 investment in College Now advising services and financial aid counseling results in that student receiving approximately $60,000 in financial aid over four years of college.

       *College Now’s scholarship recipients have a 90 percent college retention rate from first year to second year compared to the national 58 percent rate for students from low-income backgrounds.

       *College Now’s traditional student scholarship recipients have an average 60 percent college graduation rate compared to the national 54 percent rate and the 23 percent rate for students from low-income backgrounds.

      *College Now’s adult learners have an average 55 percent graduation rate compared to the 40 percent national rate for adult learners.

Our mission and dedication to students, their families and our communityare more important now than ever given the complexities of higher education attainment’s impact on our economy and the job market.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

College Access Advising, Financial Aid Counseling, Scholarships & Retention Services

Cleveland Scholarship Programs' services address all of the barriers to college access that people face: preparedness, affordability, matriculation and retention.

* CSP invests in students as young as kindergarten to put them on the track to postsecondary education.

* We help students raise their educational aspirations, explore their postsecondary options and prepare for college admission.

* CSP advisors work with students on-site at 57 schools in Cuyahoga County, comprised of 47 high schools and 10 middle schools. Most of these students are from low-income families and many will become the first generation in their families to attend college.

* CSP paid a total of more than $2.2 million in college scholarships to 2117 individuals (1,790 tradtional and 327 adult students) last year.

* For every scholarship dollar awarded, CSP locates an additional $12 in aid.

* We provide support to CSP scholarship recipients during college through our financial-aid advising and 1.800.NEED.AID toll-free number.

*More than 70% of CSP scholarship recipients remain in Northeast Ohio after college graduation.

By increasing access to college through these comprehensive programs, CSP helps build an educated workforce in Northeast Ohio.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

Budget

Service Areas

Self-reported

Ohio

11 counties in the Northeast Ohio region (Ashtabula, Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, Lorain, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit and Trumbull), with the majority of clients residing in Cuyahoga County.

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

College Now Greater Cleveland Inc
Fiscal year: Aug 01-Jul 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

College Now Greater Cleveland, Inc.

Leadership

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Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
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Principal Officer

Ms. Lee A. Friedman

BIO

Prior to joining the Cleveland Leadership Center, Lee served nine years as President and CEO for the Downtown Cleveland Partnership, the nonprofit organization committed to fostering development and growth in Downtown Cleveland. Lee is a Cleveland native, a graduate of Beachwood High School and of Colgate University. She received her Masters of Public Administration from George Washington University in 1979. Lee’s community activities include serving as a president of The City Club of Cleveland; co-chair of United Way Individual Giving Campaign; a member of Mayor Jackson’s Operation Efficiency Oversight Council; a mentor for the Civic Innovation Lab at The Cleveland Foundation; a member of the Flashes of Hope board; a member of the Weatherhead Advisory Committee at Case Western Reserve University; and a member of the College of Urban Affairs (Cleveland State University) Visiting Committee. For the past 10 years, Lee has also been on “Inside Business Magazine’s” list of the 100 Most Influential Individuals in Northeast Ohio.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

William Koehler

Deloitte

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?