Educational Institutions

DANIEL MURPHY SCHOLARSHIP FUND

  • Chicago, IL
  • www.dmsf.org

Mission Statement

The Daniel Murphy Scholarship Fund offers high school scholarship assistance and programmatic support to Chicago students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. DMSF makes a powerful difference in the lives of Murphy Scholars by providing them with the best opportunity for high school, college, and life-long success.

Main Programs

  1. Mentoring & Affinity Groups
  2. Tutoring
  3. College Counseling
  4. Summer Opportunities
  5. Freshman Summer Bridge
Service Areas

Self-reported

Illinois

Chicago, IL

ruling year

1990

Executive Director

Self-reported

Mr. Andrew David

Keywords

Self-reported

Chicago, IL

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Also Known As

DMSF

EIN

36-3675466

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Secondary/High School (B25)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (O12)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The mission of the Daniel Murphy Scholarship Fund is to provide life-changing educational opportunities to Chicago-area students by offering scholarships to college preparatory high schools and educational programming to support our Scholars' academic persistence and lifelong success.

In order to achieve our stated mission, DMSF must raise enough money to fund the scholarships and programming support that our Scholars need to be successful in high school.

DMSF proudly supported 341 students throughout the 2014-2015 school year and graduated 81 seniors. The DMSF Family is also growing—112 8th graders were accepted as DMSF Scholars last year, and our current student enrollment is 372. These achievements and marked growth are possible because of strategic fundraising and the generous support of our donors.

DMSF's 25th anniversary was not only an organizational milestone of our longevity and progress; it was also a hugely popular achievement among our donors. We anticipated about $650,000 in revenue from our 25th Anniversary event but it grossed $1,130,000 in the end. We are so grateful for the commitment of our supporters.

The celebration of DMSF's 25th event offered the perfect opportunity for our Board of Directors to kick off our commitment to grow our student population by 40% by the year 2020. The commitment to increase the number of Scholars from 350 to 500 students naturally begot the campaign's Forward to 500 campaign.

(The first phase of this campaign focused only on Board of Directors and Chairman's Counsel and yielded $1,233,350 in multi-year commitments by the end of fiscal year 2015. Phase I wrapped in December 2015 with 100% participation and close to $4,000,000 in pledges.)

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Mentoring & Affinity Groups

For many of our Scholars the high school experience requires emotional, academic, and social adjustments. To help ensure their success, DMSF matches Scholars who request a mentor with a caring adult who serves as a confidant and advisor. Mentors and Scholars communicate regularly and meet independently at least once each quarter. DMSF hosts a number of organized social and cultural events to facilitate mentor-mentee engagement.

Some DMSF Scholars participate in a group mentoring program which we refer to as Affinity Groups. Qualified and relatable DMSF alumni serve as Affinity Group facilitators for groups of between 10 and 15 Scholars who gather for academic goal setting as well as cultural and career exploration. The Affinity Groups meet every other weekend during the school year, and offer a fun, safe space for sharing with peers who share similar backgrounds and experiences.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Young Adults (20-25 years)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Program 2

Tutoring

DMSF requires that all Scholars maintain a GPA of 3.0. To help make sure that our Scholars meet this obligation, DMSF makes professional tutoring available to them in a variety of locations most convenient for the Scholar. In addition, a dedicated tutoring center exists at the DMSF offices and is open two afternoons a week.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Program 3

College Counseling

Many DMSF Scholars will be the first generation in their families to attend college. To help both Scholars and their parents, DMSF has implemented a four-year college counseling curriculum. We take Scholars and parents on college tours beginning their freshman year of high school, and we host seminars to discuss the different types of colleges and universities as well as the many kinds of applications and financial aid packages. Beginning junior year we help our Scholars prepare for standardized tests like the ACT and SAT, we help them develop the list of colleges to which they will apply, and we help them find scholarships for which they are eligible. DMSF has a full-time college counselor on its staff to facilitate this work.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Program 4

Summer Opportunities

Widely-recognized research on the “Summer Slide” demonstrates that students of all age groups who are unengaged and unproductive during the summer months lose some of the academic gains earned during the previous school year. To combat this learning loss phenomenon and capitalize on opportunities for Scholar growth, DMSF organizes a number of summer opportunities including internships, service projects, study abroad experiences, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) programs.

The hallmark summer opportunity that DMSF offers its Scholars is our Caddie Program. This competitive program provides immediate and long-term benefits for DMSF Scholars—immediately, Scholars earn spending money and gain job experience while caddying at local country clubs for the summer. Caddies live in college dormitories for the duration of the program and experience independence away from home. Caddying, in addition to maintaining good grades, also makes Scholars eligible to apply for the Chick Evans Scholarship, a four-year, full tuition college scholarship awarded by the Western Golf Association. To date, over 250 DMSF Scholars have been awarded the Evans Scholarship.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Program 5

Freshman Summer Bridge

In order to prepare newly-admitted DMSF Scholars for the upcoming college preparatory environment of our partner schools, each incoming freshman must attend two week-long workshops during the summer before they enter high school. The first workshop, which is presented by a group of professional speech pathologists, teaches Scholars how to use the academic and business language that is expected of them in high school. The second workshop helps students prepare to be an “Ideal Student” and covers such topics as time management, organization skills and note-taking. Together, these workshops provide transitional support to link our Scholars’ middle school experiences to those they will encounter at a college preparatory high school.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Number of students enrolled

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years)

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The driving goal of the Daniel Murphy Scholarship Fund is to provide meaningful education and academic support during high school so that our Scholars have the best opportunity to enroll in and excel throughout college. Our programs support our Scholars early and continue throughout their high school enrollment.

    In addition to scholarship awards, the Daniel Murphy Scholarship Fund provides tailored enrichment programs to support student success including tutoring, mentoring, affinity group sessions, and college counseling. Our comprehensive approach offers real-time impact with lasting ramifications for our Scholars' futures.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    We offer comprehensive, innovative programming to support our Scholars both in and out of the classroom.

    DMSF programming includes:

    -professional tutoring
    -adult mentors
    -affinity group support
    -college counseling
    -standardized test preparation
    -academic support and advocacy
    -social outings
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Our education and fundraising teams collaborate to ensure that the appropriate resources are available for our Scholars to succeed. Through the support of our volunteers, donors, Board of Directors, and dedicated staff, DMSF Scholars are fully supported.

    The education team utilizes the expertise of former educators, former DMSF Scholars themselves, and up-to-date studies to best inform their work. The fundraising team, also relying on education's best practices, builds their work around student need and organizational well-being. Effectiveness and efficiency are DMSF's driving goals .
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Daniel Murphy Scholarship Fund measures Scholar success by monitoring the academic achievement, standardized test performance, extracurricular involvement, and college admission rate. DMSF requires that all scholarship recipients maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average in core courses also offers standardized test preparation so that DMSF Scholars remain competitive during the college admission, especially financial aid award, granting process. Scholars are encouraged to take full advantage of the extracurricular activities offered at their schools as well as take on leadership roles in their communities. We foster student development in all facets so that DMSF Scholars have the best chance to graduate from high school, enroll in and persist through college, and go on to become thriving professionals in the workplace after graduation.

    Since our original “class" of four Scholars in 1989, the Daniel Murphy Scholarship Fund has impacted the lives of 2,200 scholarship participants. To contextualize the DMSF impact, we compare the achievements of our Scholars to their peers across the country and here at home at Chicago Public Schools. Specifically, the high school graduation rate at DMSF is 86%, the national rate is 81%, and the CPS rate is 73%. Our Scholars' average ACT score is 24.3 points which is 3.3 greater than the national and 8.3 above the CPS average. Most impressively, DMSF Scholars enroll at 4-year colleges more than two times their peers at CPS and across the country—97% of DMSF Scholars attend 4-year schools as compared to 39% nationally and 40% in CPS. Of those who attend college, 85% of DMSF Scholars graduate. Unfortunately, only 18% of students complete their degrees among all 50 states, and a mere 14% of students who begin 9th grade at a CPS high school will graduate college. Overall, our college persistence rate is the best descriptor of the long-term impact of the DMSF.

    DMSF measures organizational effectiveness by tracking Scholar high school and college persistence, financial sustainability, constituent engagement, and transparency. A full 100% of the Scholar Class of 2015 was accepted to four-year colleges—97% enrolled in Bachelor's Degree programs and 3% began Associate's Degree tracks at community college. Eighteen Evans Scholarships were awarded to the Class of 2015 DMSF Scholars as well as one Golden Apple and one Posse award. Our Scholars' high school achievement often continues in college, and the classes of 2011 through 2013 earned an 88% college persistence rate. We expect this to increase steadily over the next few years. Student success is best supported by a strong organization, so financial sustainability, donor engagement, and overall transparency is crucial. The Daniel Murphy Scholarship Fund works tirelessly to ensure best practices are in place on both the development and programming areas of our work.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    In order to continue our community impact and longevity as an organization, the Daniel Murphy Scholarship Fund launched the Forward to 500 Campaign to increase the number of awarded scholarships to 500 by the year 2020. To sustain this initiative, the Development and Education teams began significant strategic planning to increase fundraising efforts, staff capacity, and in-office operations with a special focus on major gift solicitation and Scholar recruitment.

    One strategy included a business engagement with Merge, a marketing and branding company, to streamline our organization's brand and messaging strategy in anticipation of increased outreach including ideas for a new logo, greater social media presence, and public engagement. The Education Committee has long hoped to convert the Scholar application to an online format, and in FY 2016, the process is in place. DMSF is in the process of developing a customized Salesforce database that will provide immediate access to Scholar demographics, performance data, and participation information. The Events Committee has been strategizing about ways to engage new donor demographics and is considering adding new fundraising events to do so.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Illinois

Chicago, IL

Social Media

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External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

DANIEL MURPHY SCHOLARSHIP FUND
Fiscal year: Sep 01-Aug 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

DANIEL MURPHY SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Executive Director

Mr. Andrew David

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Justin Foley

Head of Trading, The Gelber Group

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?