Youth Development

After School Matters

  • Chicago, IL
  • www.afterschoolmatters.org

Mission Statement

To provide Chicago public high school teens opportunities to explore and develop their talents, while gaining critical skills for work, college and beyond.

Main Programs

  1. After School Matters
Service Areas

Self-reported

Illinois

Our programs reach every corner of the city of Chicago to provide opportunities for 15,000 teens annually. 92% of our teens are Chicago Public School Students. 83% of our teens live in high-poverty communities.

ruling year

2001

Chief Executive Officer since 2012

Self-reported

Mary Ellen Caron

Keywords

Self-reported

Chicago, after school, youth development, community, teens, youth

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EIN

36-4409182

 Number

6078432103

Physical Address

66 East Randolph Street

Chicago, IL 60601

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

After School Matters has served more than 200,000 Chicago teens over the past 25 years. We are one of the nation's largest and most successful providers of after-school and summer programs for high school students. After School Matters programs provide a safe and productive space for teens during the critical hours after school, when violence soars and young people need a supportive environment.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

After School Matters

After School Matters impacts Chicago public high school teens by offering innovative out-of-school time programming in the arts, science, sports, technology and communications. Through over 700 programs annually, teens are provided hands-on, project-based opportunities while engaging with independent instructors and community based organizations.

  

Our specific program offerings include:
 

 

 

gallery37 - teaching teens specialized artistic skills and developing their artistic voices through programs in the visual, performing, musical and culinary arts
 

 

 

science37 - strengthening teens' scientific aptitude while piquing their intellectual curiosity through programs in applied, natural and social sciences
 

 

 

sports37 – certifying teens to officiate and become junior coaches across various national organizations
 

 

 

tech37 – developing teens’ skills in audio/visual, information and industrial technology
 

 

 

words 37 – encouraging interest in media, journalism and the literary field, including verse, prose and debate

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

$24,467,727.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    After School Matters provides teens with opportunities to discover their potential and find their future. It is our mission to ensure that all Chicago teens, particularly those that lack resources, have access to a transformative program experience.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Our hands-on, project-based apprenticeship and internship programs – in the arts, communications, science, sports and technology – allow teens to explore and develop their talents while gaining critical skills for work, college and beyond.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Our footprint is citywide, giving teens close to 350 accessible program site options including; 135 community and faith based organizations, museums and cultural institutions
    71 Chicago Public School sites
    52 Chicago Park District sites
    22 Chicago Public Library sites
    55 neighborhood locations, including local businesses and City Colleges
    7 downtown program sites including Gallery 37 Center for the Arts
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Freshmen On-Track:

    Students on-track at the end of their freshman year are 3.5 times more likely to graduate high school in four years than off-track students. Over the past four years, After School Matters' Freshmen On-Track rate has risen from 79 to 87 percent, four percentage points higher than teens who do not participate in programs. Freshman On-Track is a better predictor of graduation than race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and 8th grade test scores.

    High School Attendance:

    A study by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago found that our teens had fewer school day absences than their peers (7.5 days missed vs. 9.6) after controlling for demographic characteristics and school attachment.

    High School Graduation:

    92.6% of our high school seniors recently graduated, while the statewide graduation rate for low-income students is 73%. Further, a study by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago found that teens in our programs were 2.7 times more likely to graduate high school than their peers who did not participate, even after controlling for demographic characteristics and prior achievement.

    Retention:

    Students who participate in more After School Matters programs experience more successful outcomes.

    College Enrollment and Persistence:

    64% of After School Matters 12th graders had enrolled in college by the fall following their graduation, compared to 56% of CPS graduates citywide. In addition, 70% of those teens persisted in college for at least a second year.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Last year, we offered 23,000 program opportunities, but we received more than
    40,000 applications. We need your help to close this opportunity gap.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Illinois

Our programs reach every corner of the city of Chicago to provide opportunities for 15,000 teens annually. 92% of our teens are Chicago Public School Students. 83% of our teens live in high-poverty communities.

Social Media

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External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

AFTER SCHOOL MATTERS INC
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

After School Matters

Leadership

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Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
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  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
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Chief Executive Officer

Mary Ellen Caron

BIO

In June 2012, Mary Ellen Caron, Ph.D. joined After School Matters as chief executive officer. A longtime member of the Advisory Board, she happily accepted the position which combines her passion for serving Chicago's youth with her administrative expertise. Altogether, Dr. Caron is responsible for ensuring that Chicago teens have access to the high-quality, out-of-school time opportunities that will prepare them for their futures.

Prior to After School Matters, Dr. Caron served as commissioner of the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services. At the time of her appointment in January 2009, the department was a consolidation of several of the City's former human service departments. Dr. Caron successfully managed the transition and worked to provide a continuum of support for Chicago's vulnerable residents, from birth through the senior years.

STATEMENT FROM THE Chief Executive Officer

"When we envision the future, we see the faces of those who will lead us there—our young people. These faces are composed of every color, and come from all backgrounds and zip codes. But, the fact is not all of these faces will have a say in our collective future…unless we help them find their voice. To that end, we are proud to present an annual report on the comprehensive investments After School Matters is making in Chicago teens.

Last year, After School Matters provided 23,000 teen opportunities, which represents a 1,000 student increase from 2015. Although this is a tremendous accomplishment, it is muted by the fact that nearly 40,000 teens applied for these opportunities.

So what does that mean for our city, and for our youth? To us, it means that teens want and deserve high quality after-school and summer opportunities, and the time is now to step up and do more. After School Matters is ready. By simply reading this report, we know you too are ready. Now is the time to say unequivocally that our teens matter, that they are important. The faces you see throughout these pages are our future."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mellody Hobson

Ariel Investments, Inc.

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?