Educational Institutions

African Solutions To African Problems

  • Valatie, NY
  • www.africansolutions.org

Mission Statement

ASAP develops and supports community-based organisations of women providing holistic care for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) affected by HIV/AIDS in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa.

Long term and concentrated in development practice, the ASAP 6-year Model has been piloted since 2008 in rural villages, with the objective of scaling broad-based care to OVC through community-based intervention. ASAP identifies emerging groups of women and the Model guides them step by step to become mature, fully functional Community Based Organisation (CBOs) with skills and resources to provide sustainable care and enhance wellbeing of OVC. With the construction of Drop-in centres within access of schools, caregivers provide OVC with; nutrition, school uniforms & shoes, access to education, health services & social welfare grants, youth development and adolescent girl programmes. The development for the women includes training in project management, bookkeeping, computer, child care, psychosocial support, grant and report writing, permaculture and nutrition. In this manner ASAP ensures the holistic development of OVC, which in addition to addressing basic needs also nurtures and fosters relationships that ensure stable affectionate care and opportunities for OVC to develop their full potential.

As the Model empowers less capacitated organizations to meet the challenges of governance and accountability as well as organizational development, crucial to financial sustainability, we will see stronger and more sustainable programs emerge. The CBO can then attract funding themselves and meet their own development goals, while caring for increasing numbers of OVC

Main Programs

  1. ASAP 6-Year Model
  2. Literacy Project
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

The rural Eastern Cape Province of South Africa has the highest numbers of orphans & vulnerable children (23%), double orphans in grandmother or child-headed households (80,000 child-headed households), inadequate food access; 73% of children live in poverty, 30% don’t attend school high rate of illiteracy. 60% of 15-24 yr. olds are unemployed. 5m school children do not receive nutritional food, affecting their capacity to concentrate and learn; ltd government service delivery /support or basic infrastructure. Ltd public transport, distances to clinics, schools badly resourced. Poor education levels & low attendance.

ruling year

2006

ASAP Founder & Program Director

Self-reported

Ms. Priscilla D Higham

Co Principal Officer

Self-reported

Mr. Noah Fischel

Keywords

Self-reported

Orphans and Vulnerable Children; OVC; Drop-In Centers, Community Based Organisations; CBOs; youth; people living with aids, psycho-social support; holistic care; capacity building; sustainability

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EIN

36-4562653

Also Known As

ASAP

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Education N.E.C. (B99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

SA has the highest rate of AIDS worldwide. According to UNAIDS, there are 1.9million orphans due to AIDS in South Africa. The ASAP Model applies 10 years of lessons learned in rural development, Community Cased Organisations (CBO) and board development and community entry. In 2008 we started piloting the 6-year Model. To date 77 caregivers are providing holistic care to 900 children and positively impacting the guardians, families of caregivers and board members.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

ASAP 6-Year Model

Long term and concentrated in development practices, the ASAP 6-year Model has the objective of scaling broad-based care to Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) through community-based intervention. The Model identifies emerging groups of women and guides, supports and develops them to become mature, fully functional Community Based Organizations (CBOs) with skills and resources to provide sustainable care to OVC in their villages. Construction of Drop-in centres within access of schools, from where OVC are provided with; nutrition, school uniforms & shoes, access to education, health services & social welfare grants and youth development. The development for the women include training in project management, bookkeeping, computers, child care, psychosocial, grant and report writing, permaculture and nutrition. In this manner ASAP ensures the holistic development of OVC, which in addition to addressing basic needs also nurtures and fosters relationships that ensure effective care and opportunities for OVC to develop their full potential. As the Model empowers less capacitated organizations to meet the challenges of governance and accountability as well as organizational development, crucial to financial sustainability, we will see stronger and more sustainable programs emerge. The CBO can then attract funding themselves and meet their own development goals, while caring for increasing numbers of OVC.

Category

Community Development, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Females, all ages or age unspecified

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

People Living with HIV or AIDS - PLWHA

Budget

Program 2

Literacy Project

The Eastern Cape of South Africa has the highest proportion of functionally illiterate learners in South Africa, at a staggering 38.6%. Despite South Africa experiencing the highest matric pass rate in 20 years in 2013, the Eastern Cape Province has lagged far behind with a matric pass rate of only 64.9%.
A lack of provision of library books to stimulate literacy development partially explains these disappointing results.
97% of Eastern Cape schools do not have a functioning library; 90% do not have a library at all. Poor administration by the Department of Basic Education has stalled the process of correcting these conditions: for example, 75% of books expected from the Department to Eastern Cape schools were short-supplied in 2013. Research has shown that the school performance of learners can increase by 10-25% simply by providing them with stocked libraries

Category

Literacy

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

None

Budget

$40,000.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The ASAP Model focuses on developing sustainability and holistic care. ASAP has chosen to develop a model which can be defined as impact through depth rather than breadth. We empower and enable rural woman to be fully accountable for their Community Based Organistion (CBO), to be self-governing, auditable and capacitated so that they can continue to provide holistic care after 6 years as they become independent. Through Monitoring and Evaluation, grant-writing, accounting and bookkeeping, computer skills and office practice programs, the women are empowered with the tools they need to be self-governing and to establish sustainable organizations with current CBOs participating in mentorship of new CBOs.
    ASAP currently has 2 Community Based Organisations (CBOs) with Drop-In Centres in year 6 of the ASAP Model, another is in Year 3 of the Model, another in Year 2 and another in Year 1.
    By the end of 2014, ASAP will have a total of 10 CBO's / Drop-In Centres. The plan is to increase the number of Drop-In Centres by another 2 in 2016. The strategy is to fully test the Model and grow incrementally first before considering a scale-up plan post 2016.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    ASAP was founded in 2003 to demonstrate the effectiveness of funding at a community level in marginalized communities, with a focus on finding existing solutions to care for increasing numbers of Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC). The purpose of ASAP aid is to make women self-reliant and independent by the generous supply of appropriate intellectual gifts, namely, gifts of relevant knowledge on the methods of self-help. The proposed change had to stand in some organic relationship to what they are doing already.
    ASAP identifies and works with emerging groups of women caring for OVC infected and affected by HIV/AIDS in rural communities of the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. We guide, support and build their capacity to help them develop into mature fully functional Community Based Organisation (CBOs) with the prerequisite skills and resources to provide quality and sustainable broad-based care to OVC in their communities. In this manner ASAP ensures the holistic development of OVC, which in addition to addressing the basic needs of food medical care and education, also nurtures and fosters relationships that ensure effective psycho-social support and opportunities for OVC to develop their full potential
    By allowing organizations to develop their own models of care; in addition to regular on-site capacity-building visits, these organizations and their networks of women are capable of scaling up to reach increased numbers of OVC. As we empower less capacitated organizations to meet the challenges of governance and accountability, as well as organizational development, crucial to financial sustainability, we will see stronger and more sustainable programs emerge.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Over 10 years, ASAP has worked closely with woman from the rural villages caring for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) and People with Aids (PWAs) and created a 6-year development model that builds and strengthens emerging groups into mature organizations. The goal is to build Community Based Organisation (CBO) capacity to attain 100% accountability, develop & practice good governance, deliver effective broad-based care and scale up services to increasing numbers of OVC. These CBOs are then able to attain their own development goals and acquire & manage funding, while building their own sustainable organizations.
    To date, ASAP has succeeded in setting up 19 CBOs, built 32 drop-in centres and established 121 permaculture gardens. OVCs to date total 14,681 with many receiving nutritious meals at the drop-in centres. To improve literacy levels, 8 libraries have been Installed in the local village schools with books in both the children’s mother-tongue and English.
    ASAP's head office is in Cape Town, South Africa (run by 5 staff) and a Project Office in the Eastern Cape close to the rural villages with a strong, experienced and competent permanent staff of seven people.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    ASAP uses relevant indicators of progress to analyse and improve programs and determine outcomes and successes. We ensure accountability by using the checks and balances set up within each Community Based Organisation (CBO) structure. A key aspect of ASAP support is to provide capacity-building interventions that helps them develop their organisations and improve their services. We train CBO staff in Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) practices, to track interventions and document outcomes. Training increases in complexity, helping groups who have no administrative systems and little organizational infrastructure to grow at their own pace. In this way, informal groups of motivated volunteers transform into well-run organizations. In order to meet transparency and reporting requirements, ASAP has developed concise quantitative monitoring tools. Data is also collected from CBO quarterly reports with specific indicators to measure success including, the numbers of Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) accessing nutrition, education and psycho-social support services, clinic referrals and access to government grants. CBO capacity is measured according to general operations including office records and accounting, efficiency of program implementation as measured against timelines, number and attendance of staff and board meetings. Timely and systematic monthly reporting from CBO's on monthly statistics. Evaluations are based on quarterly site visits by ASAP staff to CBOs, which includes interviews with guardians, educators, children, child care workers, practitioners, community members to assess the program progress, problems, successes and lessons. Progress will be carefully monitored against the proposed goals, objectives, activities, outputs and costs; quarterly qualitative and quantitative reviews; year-end program evaluation and assessments to objectively evaluate and assess project accomplishments and the extent to which its objectives and the desired outcomes have been achieved and evaluation of impact on programs targeting OVC and PWAs
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Over the last 10 years, ASAP has worked closely with the women running the drop-in centres, the tribal authorities and government departments, as well as the schools in the rural villages. The Community Based Organisations (CBOs) have boards made up of community members who report on the success of the intervention and challenges met which informs program implementation.
    To date, ASAP has succeeded in setting up 19 CBOs, built 32 drop-in centres and established 121 permaculture gardens in the Eastern Cape. Total number of OVC receiving support to date is 22,495.
    According to Statistics South Africa 25% of households in the Eastern Cape are experiencing food inadequacy. Investing in agriculture is in line with the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) which aims to halve the proportion of people who go hungry by 2015. The women in the Drop-in Centres prepare well balanced meals five days a week using fresh vegetables from the permaculture gardens.
    Children’s performance at school has improved as testified by the teachers. Poor performance in Eastern Cape schools is reflected in the low pass rates (58%) and high illiteracy (38.6% of learners are functionally illiterate). Schools average just 92 library books and 1.9 computers per school. To improve literacy levels, 8 village schools have been provided with books in both local languages and English, in line with the school curriculum. Professional library training was given to the teachers to maintain effective library usage for both teachers and students and to promote literacy. Education is key in the prevention of HIV/AIDS however more than 30% of children do not attend school in the E Cape. The National Strategic Plan (NSP) stated that completing secondary schooling is protective against HIV, especially for young girls. ASAP supports the NSP's priorities: implementing community-based approaches to behaviour change, including peer education and outreach targeted at hard-to-reach groups; strengthening linkages between HIV prevention and treatment, care and support services.
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

The rural Eastern Cape Province of South Africa has the highest numbers of orphans & vulnerable children (23%), double orphans in grandmother or child-headed households (80,000 child-headed households), inadequate food access; 73% of children live in poverty, 30% don’t attend school high rate of illiteracy. 60% of 15-24 yr. olds are unemployed. 5m school children do not receive nutritional food, affecting their capacity to concentrate and learn; ltd government service delivery /support or basic infrastructure. Ltd public transport, distances to clinics, schools badly resourced. Poor education levels & low attendance.

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

African Solutions to African Problems
Fiscal year: Mar 01-Feb 28
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

African Solutions To African Problems

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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ASAP Founder & Program Director

Ms. Priscilla D Higham

Co Principal Officer

Mr. Noah Fischel

BIO

Priscilla Higham (ex officio) Founder and Program Director of ASAP, first began working with women caring for orphans and vulnerable children in 2000 while working as a journalist in Nairobi. Founded ASAP in 2003 in South Africa.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Suzi Peel

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?