Environmental Quality Protection, Beautification

Center for Climate Protection

  • Santa Rosa, CA
  • www.climateprotection.org

Mission Statement

To inspire, align, and mobilize action in response to the climate crisis. We work with business, government, youth and the broader community to advance practical, science-based solutions for significant greenhouse gas emission reductions.

Main Programs

  1. Community Choice Energy
  2. ECO2school Youth Education and Leadership Training
  3. Solar Energy Program
  4. Electric Vehicle Adoption Program
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

We work at the local level to show the region, state and nation how to prevent the potentially catastrophic threat of global warming. Our mission is to create a positive future for our children and all life by inspiring action in response to the climate crisis.

ruling year

2002

Co-Founder and Executive Director

Self-reported

Ms. Ann Hancock

Deputy Director

Self-reported

Barry Vesser

Keywords

Self-reported

Climate Change, Renewable Energy, Community Choice, Youth Climate Leadership

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EIN

45-0485495

Also Known As

CCP

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Single Organization Support (C11)

Energy Resources Conservation and Development (C35)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The Center for Climate Protection (CCP) is committed to accelerating Sonoma County as a green solutions incubator to beat climate change. The Center for Climate Protection's programs mobilize people to effectively decrease greenhouse gas emissions in Sonoma County. CCP's current programs include Community Choice Energy, ECO2School a youth leadership development program, Solar Sonoma County, and a new transportation initiative to incentivize the switch from the gas pump to the charging station. In our quest for solutions, areas of current investigation include localizing and integrating energy resources, microgrids, demand response, monetizing energy efficiency and reducing barriers to electrifying the transportation sector. CCP's programs strive for these criteria: high-impact, cost-effective, practical, under local control, make it easier for everyone to do the right thing, and are so inspiring that they spread to communities everywhere.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Community Choice Energy

In 2005, CCP identified Community Choice Energy was the most powerful, cost-effective solution under local control for significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Community Choice Energy is a local, public program that buys and generates electricity for business and residents. It introduces competition and choice into the electricity market with a focus on local, renewable energy to stimulate rapid innovation in clean energy solutions.
We began informing business, government and the community to establish a Community Choice Energy program in Sonoma County. Sonoma Clean Power, California's second operational Community Choice Energy program, began serving customers in May 2014.
In addition to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, Sonoma Clean Power offers rate stability, stimulation of local the economy, green job creation, a more resilient energy system, and renewable energy development.

Category

Community, Business & Industry

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Budget

Program 2

ECO2school Youth Education and Leadership Training

The Center for Climate Protection's Youth Leadership program, ECO2school, is a service-learning program that inspires young people to take action for immediate greenhouse gas reductions while promoting long-term personal, community and environmental health. Through the program, youth make a measurable difference by walking , bicycling, skating, carpooling and using public transportation. Youth leaders are trained to inspire their families and their peers to rapidly reduce carbon footprint generated from transportation in an evidence-based statistics model.

Category

Community Development

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Program 3

Solar Energy Program

Solar Sonoma County's two premier programs are Clean Energy Advocate, helping homes and businesses navigate the many solar options, guiding them to determine if solar is right for them. Certified Local vets and brands solar businesses to advantageously position them in the market.

Category

Community, Business & Industry

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

Program 4

Electric Vehicle Adoption Program

The transportation sector poses the largest climate protection challenge facing Sonoma County and California. Almost two-thirds or 65 percent of Sonoma County's greenhouse gas emissions come from transportation. The Center's latest effort to reduce emissions from transportation is to accelerate the switch to electric vehicles. We are convening stakeholders, assessing opportunities, and identifying key solutions. We have published a white paper with eight core strategies to raise awareness and invest in infrastructure to incentivize the switch off the pump and onto a charging system. The paper also describes Sonoma County's status and progress toward electric vehicle adoption as a baseline for setting a countywide goal.

Category

Community, Business & Industry

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    No greater privilege exists than working to leave this planet in better shape for those who come after us. Sonoma County is leading California in climate action, and California is leading the nation. Our goal is to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions through incubating high-impact, science-based programs at the community-scale to align with California's 2050 emissions reduction goals. We want to inspire Community Choice Energy programs across California. We want to equip youth leaders to assume responsibility in the future. We want to inspire leadership from business, the engine of change. We aim to accelerate solar energy deployment. And we envision low or no carbon travel and an electrified transportation system. Our vision is to deliver these and other game-changing solutions to inspire other communities to act and follow our example.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    1. Ensure that Sonoma Clean Power is implemented optimally
    2. Spread the Sonoma Clean Power model to other communities, starting in California
    3. Continue to incubate other replicable, cost-effective model programs that significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
    4. Design and institute a process of continual individual and organizational improvement to ensure high functioning capacity and performance.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    The Center for Climate Protection has achieved the following milestones to demonstrate its organizational capability:

    2001 Climate Protection Campaign founded

    2002 National precedent: Sonoma County and nine cities officially pledged to climate protection

    2003 National precedent: Sonoma County and nine cities complete emission inventories

    2005 National precedent: Sonoma County and nine cities set goal to cut greenhouse gas by 25%

    2008 Community Climate Action Plan issued

    2009 Sonoma County Energy Independence Program and Regional Climate Protection Agency began

    2010 Windsor Efficiency Pays program began

    2011 Sonoma Clean Power exploration began by Sonoma County Water Agency's

    2013 Santa Rosa, Sonoma, Windsor, Cotati and Sebastopol cities join Sonoma Clean Power; North Bay Business Journal named Sonoma Clean Power year's top story

    2014 Sonoma Clean Power began serving customers

    2015 Merged with Solar Sonoma County and initiated electric vehicle transportation program.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    As we have for the past six years, the Center for Climate Protection produced and published a “report card" of Sonoma County's greenhouse gas emissions. The report shows emissions by sector (transportation, electricity, natural gas, solid waste, and agriculture), the overall trend since 1990, and compares overall emissions to Sonoma County's 25% GHG reduction target for 2015. Please contact the Center for Climate Protection for current information and updates.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Emissions from greenhouse gas are down in Sonoma County, however, the county still has a ways to go to meet its goal. In 2014, Sonoma County's electricity and natural gas emissions decreased by nearly 12 percent from 2013. The county produced about 3.6 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions , which is down about 14 percent from 2007, when county emissions reached a high of about 4.2 million tons.
    Transportation is the county's largest culprit of carbon production, accounting for about 65 percent of Sonoma County's total emissions. Such emissions began decreasing in 2009 but started increasing again in 2013. Causes may be a growing economy or increased population. Regardless, vehicle miles are expected to increase. Obstacles to emission reduction measures include increases in population and an economy currently based on fossil fuels.
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

We work at the local level to show the region, state and nation how to prevent the potentially catastrophic threat of global warming. Our mission is to create a positive future for our children and all life by inspiring action in response to the climate crisis.

Social Media

Blog

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

CENTER FOR CLIMATE PROTECTION
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Center for Climate Protection

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Co-Founder and Executive Director

Ms. Ann Hancock

Deputy Director

Barry Vesser

BIO

Ann co-founded the Center for Climate Protection in 2001. With over 25 years in community leadership, education and fundraising, she has been a sustainability planner for the County of Marin, commentator for TomPaine.com, human sexuality instructor at Humboldt State University, and real estate broker. She has a Masters in Public Health Administration and Planning from the University of California, Berkeley.

STATEMENT FROM THE Co-Founder and Executive Director

"No greater privilege exists than working to leave this planet in better shape for those who come after us. we have an incredible opportunity to go beyond what seems reasonable or possible.
The climate crisis impacts everyone and everything, including our air, water, food, and security. Those we love so dearly, our children and our grandchildren, will bear the burden. Therefore, we must prioritize climate.
Only with your support does this work happen. We hope you are inspired by the Center for Climate Protection's achievements and momentum, and that you join us and stay with us. Thank you for considering how you can be part of the solution.

Sincerely,
Ann Hancock
Executive Director"

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Jane Bender

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
No
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
Yes
We use other methods to support diversity