Arts, Culture, and Humanities

Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation

  • Crazy Horse, SD
  • www.crazyhorsememorial.org

Mission Statement

PLEASE NOTE that Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation has invested over $38M in the Mountain carving and Native American artifacts for display. IRS regulations require that we capitalize the Mountain carving expense and do not allow inclusion of this critical component of our mission in Program Expense on our 990. When the Fiscal Year 2014 funding of $1,230,923 for the Mountain carving is included, our total Program Expense is $5,290,555 or 71% of the total.

The mission of Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation is to protect and preserve the culture, tradition and living heritage of the North American Indians.The Foundation demonstrates its commitment to this endeavor by continuing the progress on the world's largest sculptural undertaking by carving a memorial of Lakota leader Crazy Horse; by providing educational and cultural programming; by acting as a repository for native American artifacts, arts and crafts through the INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® and the NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL CENTER®; and by establishing and operating the INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA® and, when practical, a medical training center for American Indians.  Donations received as a result of charitable solicitations are used to further these purposes.

Main Programs

  1. CRAZY HORSE MOUNTAIN CARVING
  2. INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA®
  3. NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL CENTER®
  4. INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA®
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

The Mission of Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation is to protect and preserve the culture, tradition and living heritage of the North American Indians.

ruling year

1949

CEO

Self-reported

Ms. Jadwiga Ziolkowski

CEO

Self-reported

Ms. Monique Ziolkowski

Keywords

Self-reported

Native American, Black Hills, American Indian, Crazy Horse

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EIN

46-0220678

 Number

7175654159

Physical Address

12151 Avenue of the Chiefs

Crazy Horse, SD 57730 8900

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Crazy Horse Memorial is a nonprofit, educational and cultural project honoring all Indians of North America. Crazy Horse Memorial is funded by admission fees and donations and is NOT a federal or state project.

Total Expenses for FY2014 are reported as $6,232,069. Of this total, $4,059,632 directly supports the Foundation's Programs. Not included in these figures is the annual cash outlay directed toward enhancing the Crazy Horse mountain carving, which totaled $1,230,923 during FY2014 (under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, the Foundation is required to record Mountain Expenses as Capital Expenditures). If this amount were allowed to be included as Program Expenses under IRS Guidelines and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, the Foundation's total Program Expenses would be reflected as $5,290,555, or 71% of the total.

The focal point of the project is the mountain carving depicting the legendary warrior Crazy Horse, selected by the Lakota elders to stand as an enduring symbol of the spirit of all North American Indians. Chief Henry Standing Bear invited sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski to create the monumental tribute to indigenous peoples. Started in 1948, the world's largest carving in progress measures 641 feet long and 563 feet high.

The Memorial also features the Indian Museum of North America®, which houses one of the most extensive public collections of historic and contemporary Native American items in the United States.

In 2010, the Foundation, in partnership with the University of South Dakota (USD) – South Dakota's public, flagship higher-education institution, began the Indian University of North America® summer program. This program seeks to validate, inspire, and empower young American Indians by providing recent high school graduates the opportunity to earn transferable college credits while working in paid internship positions at the Memorial. USD extends academic credit for the summer programs of the Indian University of North America® and also provides highly-qualified faculty and staff for the program. Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation provides the facilities and funds student tuition, textbooks, instructional supplies, student internship compensation, and the majority of student food and lodging expenses. Additionally, Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation funds the faculty and staff salaries as well as faculty and staff food and lodging costs.

Finally, since 1978, the Foundation has awarded well over $2 million in scholarships to American Indian students striving to further their educational goals.

To learn more about the educational and humanitarian mission of the Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation, please visit www.crazyhorsememorial.org.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

CRAZY HORSE MOUNTAIN CARVING

Current: The highly complex steps in the mountain carving process at Crazy Horse can be summed up in relatively simple terms. We are making a very large duplicate of Korczak’s sculpture to tell the story of North American Indian cultures. That artwork depicts the Lakota warrior, Crazy Horse, seated on his horse and pointing over the horse’s head as he says, “My lands are where my dead lie buried.” In order to convey that powerful story on a monumental scale on the mountain we follow three basic steps: 1) measure Korczak’s model; 2) measure the mountain; 3) remove all the rock that doesn’t fit! In reality each of these steps gets quite complex and requires the use of powerful tools and techniques, but the guiding principles remain quite simple.

The members of the Crazy Horse mountain crew are experts in precision blasting, equipment operation and engineering. They maintain a strong emphasis on safety in all steps of the operation and are proud to have an outstanding safety record.

In addition to the program costs included in the 990, we have invested over $38M in the mountain carving and Native American artifacts for display.

Expenses totaling $4,059,632 directly support the Foundation's Programs. This total does not include the annual cash outlay directed toward enhancing the Crazy Horse Mountain Carving, which totaled $1,230,923 during FY2014. Without the funds directed to this endeavor, our mission would not be achieved. If this amount were allowed to be reported as program expenses under IRS guidelines and generally accepted accounting principles, the Foundation's total program expenses would be reflected as $5,290,555 or 71% of the total. We do not rely on any government funding to support our mission. All funds are raised through the fundraising efforts of our employees and board members and through visitor admissions. We take our fiduciary responsibilities seriously and strive to spend each dollar as if it were coming directly from our own pocket. Members of Korczak Ziokowski's family and the Foundation's staff continue to work tirelessly in all aspects of the Foundation operations to ensure our dream is fulfilled and the dollars are spent prudently.

Our founders are Chief Henry Standing Bear who invited Korczak Ziolkowski to carve a monument honoring Native Americans of North America; Korczak Ziolkowski the carver, and Ruth Ziolkowski, the carver's wife.

The Mountain carving of Crazy Horse continues on a daily basis as weather, availability of financing, and engineering challenges allow. The completed Mountain is expected to be 641 feet long by 563 feet high. Crazy Horse's completed Head is 87 feet 6 inches high. The current focus of work on the Mountain includes Crazy Horse’s Hand and the Horse’s Mane. The mountain crew uses precision explosive engineering to carefully and safely remove and shape the rock of the mountain.

For photos and more information about the process of carving the world’s largest sculpture, please visit:

https://crazyhorsememorial.org/the-mountain.html

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

Budget

Program 2

INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA®

The INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® is home to an extraordinary collection of art and artifacts reflecting the diverse histories and cultures of the American Indian people. The museum, designed to complement the story being told in stone on the mountain, speaks eloquently to present and future generations about American Indian life.

The museum collection started out with single display donated in 1965 by Charles Eder, Assiniboine-Sioux, from Montana. Mr. Eder’s impressive collection remains on display in a place of honor in the Orientation and Welcome Center at Crazy Horse Memorial.

Close to 90 percent of the museum collection has been donated, both by Native Americans and non-Natives. Many individuals and families have decided that the INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® is where their American Indian artifacts and art should find a permanent home.

The INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® serves as an excellent resource for both Native Americans and non-Natives. They have an opportunity to study and learn from the displays and the many other cultural and educational resources at Crazy Horse. It gave Korczak and Ruth and their family great satisfaction to see visitors in the museum appreciating and learning from the beautiful artifacts.

During FY2014, collections valued at $45,171 were donated to the INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® for display. The total collection currently stands at over $6 million.

To see photos and learn more about exhibits in the INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA®, please visit:

https://crazyhorsememorial.org/the-museums.html

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

Budget

Program 3

NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL CENTER®

The NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL CENTER® provides a number of unique educational opportunities, including a lecture series, geared to enhance the visitor experience. One-of-a-kind artifact collections are displayed, Native artisans/vendors are showcased, and special activities and games are featured. The center hosts and encourages many hands-on activities (e.g, playing Native American games and making Native American crafts). Activities always include explanations of cultural significance and usage in order to teach the proper cultural respect. Native American artists from all over North America spend much of the summer in residence at the center, where they are provided space at no charge. They are able to create and sell their work while interacting with visitors, which provides a valuable cultural exchange for both parties. During FY2014, 20 Native American artists were hosted in the Cultural Center.

For photos & examples of our educational programs, please visit:
https://crazyhorsememorial.org/education-2.html

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Budget

Program 4

INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA®

The INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA® commenced in FY2010 and houses students in its residence hall over the summer months as they complete their first semester of college. Students take college credit classes full-time as part of a summer curriculum (in conjunction with the University of South Dakota), including a credit-bearing internship working at the Memorial in both front line service and behind the scenes support roles.

During the summer of 2014, 32 students representing numerous tribes and states were accepted into the Indian University of North America® summer program, a unique partnership between the Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation and the University of South Dakota. These students enrolled in English, math, speech, college-success strategies, and a paid internship and spent their summer learning habits of success for college and for life. To date, 130 students have successfully completed the program. Subsequently, a handful of successful completers have earned college degrees, while 74% of past participants remain enrolled in college and on track to graduate. Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation funds accepted students’ tuition, fees, textbooks, instructional supplies, paid internship compensation, and significantly subsidized students' food and lodging costs. During FY2014 the Foundation paid expenses of $459,091 for the University program.

The Foundation also supports many other Native American students through its Scholarship Program. During FY2014, the Foundation provided $149,569 to various universities and other organizations that directly support the educational needs of Native Americans. Since 1978, the Foundation has awarded over $2 million in scholarships to American Indian students striving to further their educational goals.

For more information, please visit:
https://crazyhorsememorial.org/indian-university-of-north-america.html

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The goals of Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation directly reflect our mission to protect and preserve the culture, tradition and living heritage of the North American Indians. Our primary goal is to complete the mountain carved as a memorial of Lakota leader Crazy Horse (the world's largest sculptural undertaking), which draws visitors from around the world. Reconciliation is our second goal, fostered by educational and cultural programming presented by our INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® and NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL & CULTURAL CENTER® which showcase the creativity and cultural values of Native Americans. A medical center for Native Americans is our third goal. The summer sessions of our INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA® are a substantial achievement toward this objective.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Unlike most charities, Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation does not accept any funding from state or federal taxes. Many donors are impressed that this has been our strategy for 65 years, since the beginning. Our approach is to first make a friend. Visitors tell us they appreciate the fact that we do not always “have our hand out," asking for money. Donations often come as a result of their recognition that our operation and progress is totally supported by individuals and private enterprise. Admissions, donations, and grants from non-government sources fund the operation and progress.

    In 2014 we contracted with a fundraising counsel to guide us and help prepare for a capital campaign. We have had, and will continue to have, capital campaigns for specific purposes.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    The capabilities of Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation continue to grow each year. Our mountain crew includes the creative & engineering resources to carve the mountain, which is taller than the Washington Monument. Our museum staff works to enhance and maintain the art and artifacts entrusted to us. Our educational department continues to broaden the University and cultural awareness programs each year. Our administrative staff encompasses the financial, creative, and development needs of the organization. Internal resources drive the operation, capably and efficiently.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Donors can designate that their gift be applied to a specific part of the memorial. Many gifts are earmarked for the mountain carving. South Dakota philanthropist T. Denny Sanford issued the Sanford Challenge in December of 2013. He is matching dollar-per-dollar all donations designated for the mountain carving. This program continues until he has matched $10 million dollars.

    Every year new museum exhibits and collections are received from private & tribal sources. By far, the majority of the items in the INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® have been donated, an indicator that we are respected as a repository for Native American culture and history.

    As of August 2015, the INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA® has served 160 students from 16 states and 26 tribes.

    Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation started a scholarship fund with $250 in 1978. With the help of supporters who also contribute to this fund, we have now awarded over $2M in scholarships to Native American students.

    Our parking lot during the summer is a visual indicator of the interest in Crazy Horse Memorial. Visitor numbers increase each year, over 1.5 million in 2014. We are seeing a significant rise in visits from international guests.

  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    When Korczak Ziolkowski, the sculptor, started this project in 1949 did he know that the incredible progress on the carving of the mountain would be so impressive at this time? That 65 years later we would have 80 year-round employees, expanding to 250 employees during summers? That Crazy Horse Memorial would house a museum that rivals (and some say surpasses) the Smithsonian museum for Native Americans? That 132 students would have a significant, successful start to their pursuit of higher education because of Crazy Horse Memorial? All were the result of support from individuals and businesses who share Korczak's dream of reconciliation. We are not through yet. The ultimate dream is the completion of the mountain carving and a medical center for Native Americans. The Ziolkowski family and Crazy Horse staff are dedicated and work diligently to use your donation in pursuit of these dreams.
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

The Mission of Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation is to protect and preserve the culture, tradition and living heritage of the North American Indians.

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

CRAZY HORSE MEMORIAL FOUNDATION
Fiscal year: Oct 01-Sep 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
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CEO

Ms. Jadwiga Ziolkowski

CEO

Ms. Monique Ziolkowski

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Joe Dobbs

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?