Human Services

IBSA, Inc.

  • Topeka, KS
  • http://www.ibsa-inc.org

Mission Statement

IBSA staff, volunteers, and interns engage in a variety of efforts to promote and support job training, employment counseling and entrepreneurial activities, particularly, activities for youth and low-income adults. We provide services that assist people in their transition off welfare and into gainful employment. Clients are referred by government agencies through agreements for employment & entrepreneurial counseling, retention and support services. IBSA additionally provide related services to first-time juvenile offenders referred by the County Court Services to complete community service as required by a judicial officer of the courts. Other activities assist ex-offenders in seeking employment, training or paid apprenticeships.

Main Programs

  1. Program 1
  2. Youth Community Service
  3. AccessPoint: Entrepreneurial Program
  4. Job Readiness, Development & Retention

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Service Areas

Self-reported

Kansas

Agency primarily serve Shawnee, Wyandotte, Leavenworth and their surrounding counties in Kansas. Business development and support service activities are also conducted in the State of Louisiana, Missouri and Oklahoma. Youth enterprise development programs are available throughout the United States.

ruling year

1995

President since 1993

Self-reported

Mr. Willie Lazone Grays

Vice President since 1993

Self-reported

Mr. Willie Raymond Cole

Keywords

Self-reported

students, youth, entrepreneurship, employment, training, business, welfare, experience, internships, ex-offenders

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Also Known As

IBSA

EIN

48-1137236

 Number

7023409936

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Urban, Community (S31)

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

In 2013 IBSA has assisted well over 1,000 individuals including both youth and adults with their career, employment, academic or business needs. The agency has played a role in successfully advocating for changes in policies that affect low-income citizens and actions have help institute policies of equity at the local and state level. These include securing over $6M in public sales-tax for the economic development of women and minority owned businesses ($500,000/yr from 2000-2016); to be continued for an additional 15yrs ($500,000/yr starting in 2017). Additional advocacy efforts have instituted the passing of a Ban-the-Box policy for the City of Topeka, re-funding of a city youth employment program and additional public funds to be dedicated for urban redevelopment & revitalization.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Primary programs consist of mentoring/guidance of first-time juvenile offenders. We provide one-on-one counseling to help them understand their actions and consequences, help identify available careers, and help them try and establish goals and objectives. We work with approximately 60 youth per year that are referred by court services We also provide business counseling, training and support services to entrepreneurs of low to moderate income (including youth). Counseling assists in business/feasibility/marketing plan development, finding micro finance, contract negotiation, networking and relationship building. Support services include document preparation, website creation and promotion, and informal networking sessions with major corporate purchasing agents.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Program 2

Youth Community Service

First-time juvenile offenders are allowed the opportunity to complete community service through IBSA. Activities consist of office clerical work and can range from basic document preparation to data entry into onlinedirectories and databases. Included is one-on-one counseling, homework assistance and career guidance counseling.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

General Public/Unspecified

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

$15,000.00

Program 3

AccessPoint: Entrepreneurial Program

A 45 hour program that walks participants through completing a business feasibility plan. All aspects of a business are discussed and assignments are provided to ensure students understand the various aspects of business ownershigraduates are provided business development and support services up to one year and ongoing as necessary. The curriculum utilized is a hybrid that includes the Kauffman First Step FastTrac, NFTE and SBA Online courses.

Category

Community Development

Population(s) Served

Adults

Blacks

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Budget

$45,000.00

Program 4

Job Readiness, Development & Retention

IBSA provide job assessment, document preparation, job development and retention services to adults referred by the state welfare agency. Participants may be referred by the vocation rehabilitation office or TANF division.

Category

Employment

Population(s) Served

Adults

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Male Adults

Budget

$80,000.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The primary goal for IBSA at this time is to assist local government, nonprofits and other vested entities reduce the chronic and disproportionate unemployment of low-income persons and minorities. Other goals include creating or facilitating skill-trade programs that target noncustodial parents that are behind in child support and/or having barriers to employment, as well as continuing to strengthen program efforts that reduce high and disproportionate youth unemployment by way of expanding income opportunities through our enterprise development program, Streets University.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    The strategy to fulfilling these goals will require our organization to expand and strengthen the partnerships we have, participate in more collaborations and to lend our programs and expertise to help other startup nonprofits & small business concerns. Currently, the agency has secured additional contracting opportunities with state welfare and workforce training agencies as well as local government departments. Additionally, IBSA will begin working more with individual high schools that have high dropout rates and those youth in them that are motivated to both learn technology and earn from skills we provide in our programs. Finally, the agency will continue to keep a public profile by continued advocacy on issues that matter as it relates to disproportionate unemployment, incarceration, dropouts, procurement and need for public assistance by African Americans, other ethnic minorities and others finding themselves living in poverty.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    IBSA is led by individuals with post-secondary education and consists of volunteers that lead companies, oversee government departments and running successful companies. Having a track record of meeting performance measures set by state agencies, the agency has proven itself a worthy nonprofit in the community. The organization is fortunate to have plenty of physical space to conduct its programs, services and operation and has the technical staff to maintain systems; whether computer or other, that often is better than labs in our public schools. Immediate staff and contractors lend their talent in a variety of ways and this has led to recognition for community service and achievement from all levels of government
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    The best indicator of progress is in our financial viability, as well as our ability to meet any and all performance measures set by agencies we are contracted to provide services to. Additionally, our measure of progress will be based on if we meet the goals we have set to reduce chronic and high unemployment of African American men, women and children, and other ethnic minorities and the low-income. Progress for IBSA will also include increasing procurement revenue from government and corporations for minorities, decreased recidivism of the formerly incarcerated and increased income for Black and minority youth living in impoverished neighborhoods. As a contractor to public agencies, IBSA is gauged on its performance through statistical data-collection and recording, making it easier for us to track our performance and outcomes.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    IBSA has been very successful in its advocacy efforts. In 2000 it successfully secured 10 percent of $5M per year in sales-tax; for 12 years, to be dedicated for the economic development of women, minorities for their business & community development. This amount will also be carried over for an additional 15 years starting 2017. The agency also persuaded our local city council to institute a ban-the-box policy to remove the clause on its employment application referring to felony convictions; as well as getting the city to re-fund a youth employment program to be run year-round at $50,000 per year. Additionally, $150,000 from the sales-tax is now dedicated to programs that target low-income persons with barriers to employment by way of funding workforce training programs. These job training programs will focus on trade skill instruction and certifications for industries that are in-demand or having high levels of openings. In order to become self-sustaining, IBSA has been working for the last 6 years to secure $1.2M in order to purchase the building it occupies and adjacent properties. This is the final step to becoming a self-sustaining entity in the community and will assure financial viability; as well as the ability to house the skills training programs and to support other startup nonprofits that work with similar low-income clientele.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Kansas

Agency primarily serve Shawnee, Wyandotte, Leavenworth and their surrounding counties in Kansas. Business development and support service activities are also conducted in the State of Louisiana, Missouri and Oklahoma. Youth enterprise development programs are available throughout the United States.

Social Media

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Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

IBSA, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2009, 2008 and 2008
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
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President

Mr. Willie Lazone Grays

Vice President

Mr. Willie Raymond Cole

BIO

W. Lazone Grays founded the National Black Student Alliance in 1991. After establishing strong links and partnership with other students and student organizations in Africa, the name was changed in 1993 to reflect the new international direction and focus of Lazone's vision of unity. In 2004 the organization changed its corporate name to IBSA, Inc. A graduate of Washburn University, Lazone has received recognition from all levels of government for his works with and through IBSA; including Nigeria, Ghana and South Africa. Mr. Grays met South African President Nelson R. Mandela in 1997.

STATEMENT FROM THE President

"IBSA, Inc. serves as an institution in the communities we serve. Our commitment is to provide humanitarian services to those in need and to work with government to establish policies that will open doors of opportunity to the underserved groups in our community.

 

We are committed to serving our community and will faithfully seek out hidden opportunities that others may overlook. It is in the toughest of times we can often find opportunity and I remain optimistic that better times are ahead."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Willie Lazone Grays

President

Term: Aug 1993 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Race & Ethnicity
Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
Yes
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
Yes
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
Yes
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
Yes
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
Yes
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity