Human Services

CHILDREN FIRST CEO KANSAS INC

  • Wichita, KS
  • http://www.childrenfirstceo.org

Mission Statement

The mission of Children First: CEO (Children Educational Opportunities) Kansas Inc. is to assist in equalizing educational opportunities for low-income families.

Main Programs

  1. Promise Neighborhoods: Neighborhood Impact Project:
  2. Promise Neighborhoods: School Innovation Project

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Service Areas

Self-reported

Kansas

Wichita, Andover, Debry, and Surrounding areas

ruling year

2001

Principal Officer since 2011

Self-reported

Amber Beck

Keywords

Self-reported

Scholarship, STEM, Girls, Kansas, Wichtia, books

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Also Known As

Children First: CEO Kansas Inc

EIN

48-1235279

 Number

0593793082

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Promise Neighborhoods: Neighborhood Impact Project:

Promise Neighborhoods: Our program, “Promise Neighborhoods,” is a strategy to improve educational and developmental outcomes of low-income children and youth through an entire neighborhood. Using the Department of Education Office of Innovation and Improvement model, our program builds a continuum of cradle-through-college approach to increase graduation rates for living wage employment, particularly introducing higher paying careers (such as science, technology, engineering, and math- STEM). Two projects include: the Neighborhood Impact Project and the School Innovation Project.

Neighborhood Impact Project:
Community Farmers Markets are get connectors of people. At the same time, they often are providing fresh food and supporting a local economy by supporting local farmers. The twist to our program will be to ask those neighbors who can afford it, to make a monthly donation of $10 to an escrow account. For those low-income families in the neighborhood who struggle with food insecurities, as identified by the social worker, they would be given a weekly voucher to the community market from the account. In addition, neighborhood gardeners could bring their extra produce to the “free table.” So, the neighborhood is taking care of the neighborhood, all are connecting with each other at the community marketplace, and everyone is eating heathier.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Program 2

Promise Neighborhoods: School Innovation Project

Strategies for the School Innovation Project in 2016-2017 will work in targeted Title I schools to: 1) provide a Social Worker to connect existing community services to the students and their families who need the most assistance, 2) maintain a basic needs pantry for children/youth to increase success rate in school, and 3) create the GO 4 STEM Program.

The Social Worker will work with students and their families who need assistance. This includes helping students cope with personal and psychological issues that affect their school performance, behavior and socialization. Through one-on-one, classroom or school-wide sessions, school social workers address issues relevant to the student population they serve, such as school attendance and adjustment to the social setting of the school. They may also assist teachers and administrators in dealing with behavioral or attitude issues by communicating with students to find the causes of their distress. For example, several of our middle school students have emotional challenges, including cutting themselves and need suicide prevention. We have several students who need other basic services such as glasses and dental cleaning. The Social Worker will also supervise college-level social worker practicum students, which will expand the impact for students.

We wish to start a Basic Needs Pantry to serve the youth in our program. This pantry will focus on hygiene items (such as shampoo and deodorant), basic clothing (such as socks), and specific items that cannot be obtained through other community resources. For example, a youth moves into community after the August school supply distribution has occurred and the school is out of donated back packs. Often youth do not have access to basic hygiene supplies, such as combs and brushes, tooth paste and tooth brushes. Low-income girls often do not have feminine products. Currently, there is a hygiene pantry in our community that is open once a month, however, it focuses on the household (laundry soap, toilet paper, etc.), but not the needs of children and youth. The pantry would only be open to the school Social Worker and teachers.

GO 4 STEM (Growing and Opportunity for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math): strategies for the GO 4 STEM project in 2016-2017 will work in targeted Title I schools to: 1) create recognition for the top science and math students (both male and female) to encourage interest in STEM careers, 2) provide Science and Math teachers with classroom supplies to increase the quality of learning, and 3) host networking events for Science and Math teachers to interact with each other. Future projects could include: 1) develop STEM career days to introduce the concept of higher paying careers through advanced education, and 2) sponsor STEM Trade Show for middle school students to learn about STEM careers.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Service Areas

Self-reported

Kansas

Wichita, Andover, Debry, and Surrounding areas

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Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

CHILDREN FIRST CEO KANSAS INC

Leadership

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Principal Officer

Amber Beck

BIO

Children First’s new Executive Director is Amber Beck. She has worked with non-profit organizations for more than five years. She has a bachelor’s degree in marketing and management from Wichita State University.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Melissa Weber

Cargill

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?