Arts, Culture, and Humanities

Preservation Maryland

  • Baltimore, MD
  • www.preservationmaryland.org

Mission Statement

Since 1931, Preservation Maryland has worked to protect the places, stories and communities in Maryland that matter. As a non-profit organization, it works with partners across the state to accomplish this important mission and protect the Best of Maryland. The organization is dedicated to preserving Maryland's historic buildings, neighborhoods, landscapes and archaeological resources through outreach, funding, education and advocacy.

Main Programs

  1. Education & Outreach
  2. Six-to-Fix
  3. Heritage Grant Fund
  4. Advocacy
Service Areas

Self-reported

Maryland

Maryland

ruling year

1949

Executive Director since 2014

Self-reported

Mr. Nicholas Redding

Keywords

Self-reported

Maryland historic preservation history community development education

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EIN

52-0609575

 Number

3942596827

Physical Address

3600 Clipper Mill Road Suite 248

Baltimore, MD 21211

Also Known As

Preservation Maryland

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Historical Societies and Related Activities (A80)

Management & Technical Assistance (S02)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Preservation Maryland's goal is straightforward: To be the unquestionable statewide leader for saving the Best of Maryland.
The organization works strategically achieve that goal through investing heavily in advocacy, outreach and funding.

ADVOCACY: In 2016, as a result of the organization's aggressive advocacy, the state legislature re-authorize the state historic rehabilitation tax credit for an additional five years -- a program that has been responsible for saving thousands of historic structures across the state. The organization also serves on the leadership team of the Partners for Open Space, the state's premiere open space advocacy coalition, which worked to pass landmark legislation in 2016 protecting the vitally important Program Open Space from future cuts.

SIX-TO-FIX: Efforts to increase the impact of the organization through outreach gained additional ground in 2015 as well with the launch of Preservation Maryland's Six-To-Fix; the innovative new program that couples threatened historic resources with seed funding, capacity building, volunteers and a publicity campaign to address the cause of the threat and put these important places on a positive trajectory.

EDUCATION: The organization held another successful Preservation Summer School in 2015, the intensive one-day professional development seminar that brings together the statewide preservation community to network, learn and collaborate.

BRICKS-AND-MORTAR: Direct-aid to bricks-and-mortar projects through the organization's Heritage Grant Fund remains a critical component of the organization's work – bolstered by the decision to increase potential grant awards to $10,000, thus providing an opportunity to address larger and more complex projects. The first $10,000 grant was sent across the Bay to Cambridge to assist with the emergency repair of the Hearn Hardware Building – a critical component of the downtown historic district and future anchor for the redevelopment of that portion of historic Race Street.

Collectively, our programs are saving places through advocacy, education, outreach and funding.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Education & Outreach

Education and Outreach efforts include Preservation Summer School, a one-day advanced education program for preservation professionals. The meeting is held in mid-July of each year. In addition, these efforts include tours, workshops and hardhat tours throughout the year aimed at increased interest and awareness in historic preservation.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Adults

General Public/Unspecified

None

Budget

$75,000

Program 2

Six-to-Fix

The goal of the innovative new program is simple: select six historic sites around the state on a yearly basis that could benefit from the assistance of Preservation Maryland and through a cooperative partnership with the applicant, put that site on a new trajectory towards a better state of preservation. At an approximate cost of $15,000 in staff time, expenses and other costs per Six-To-Fix project, generating financial support for the program is an important and challenging aspect of our yearly fundraising efforts. On average, the program costs nearly $100,000 per year to manage and execute. For more information on this year's selected sites, please visit: www.sixtofix.org

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

Adults

None

Budget

$100,000

Program 3

Heritage Grant Fund

Each year, Preservation Maryland distributes nearly $100,000 in grants to deserving organizations across the state to help protect, save, enhance and interpret important pieces of Maryland's past. These grants also support worthwhile education efforts, advocacy work on behalf of threatened resources, and community development.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

Adults

None

Budget

$130,000

Program 4

Advocacy

Preservation Maryland is the statewide leader and voice for historic preservation in Maryland. The organization works on proactive issues to implement favorable policy and also fights against ill-advised projects when necessary. The organization's executive director is a registered lobbyist in Annapolis.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

Adults

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

$130,000

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Imagine a future where our communities are walkable and safe, where our farms are well-preserved, where our historic buildings are being restored at a steady pace, and where the history and culture of Maryland is one of the first things our elected leaders think about when they make their plans.

    That's the future Preservation Maryland sees when we look ahead. Our organization's job is to connect the dots between those who love the places and experiences that make Maryland great, and historic preservation. Preservation is more than just about restoring grand old buildings. We think that . . .

    If you love the vintage neon lights of the Ocean City boardwalk at night,
    you are a preservationist.

    If you marvel at the beauty of the view from the top of the Bay Bridge,
    you are a preservationist.

    If you enjoy a cup of coffee in your favorite local Main Street shop,
    you are a preservationist.

    Even if you tag photos online of a visit to a historic town or antiquing trip,
    you are a preservationist.

    The famed historian Stephen Ambrose once observed, "The past is a source of knowledge, and the future is a source of hope. Love of the past implies faith in the future."

    We are working hard to secure that future. A future made richer and more complete with history and heritage.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Our main focus is on growing and expanding the capacity of the statewide preservation movement. In practice, that means bringing more individuals, organizations and partners into our ranks by showing them how much historic preservation means to the future of our communities. Through an increased awareness, appreciation and understanding of the role preservation can play, we are optimistic that we can expand our capacity and in turn increase our impact. Every day we lose another irreplaceable historic resource -- that's what we're fighting to prevent -- and only a diverse and innovative preservation movement can overcome that challenge.

    Our primary focus of advocacy, outreach & education and funding remains the strategic and targeted set of strategies we have chosen to make this happen.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    We are Maryland's oldest, largest and most effective preservation organization. As an 80+ year old organization you might think we've slowed down a bit – but we're still full of fight. Today, our mission and fight remains the same as when we started in 1931: Preserving Maryland's Heritage.

    To make measurable impacts, our work has been divided into three specific, targeted and strategic efforts:

    Advocacy: Speaking up and making the case for the policies, programs and funding that makes preservation possible.
    Outreach & Education: Rolling up our sleeves and working to support and empower preservation efforts statewide through coordination, training and direct engagement via Maryland's Six-to-Fix.
    Funding: Directly investing in preservation projects through our Heritage Fund and by working to secure additional private philanthropy in our state's historic resources.

    This work is implemented by a dedicated staff of six full-time employees. Each team member oversees a different and equally compelling aspect of our mission. Though technically a 'small non-profit,' we pride ourselves on being alarmingly effective. We keep our administrative expenses low and have re-organized our organization in recent years to become increasingly more effective -- wringing every ounce of donor support we can into our programs.

  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    If our children and our grandchildren can honestly still visit the places in Maryland that make this state unique -- we will have succeeded in our work.

    Of course, that's the long-term answer to a short-term challenge. On a monthly basis we consider our work and ask the following questions to frame and define our progress:

    1. Are the necessary programs, policies and funding mechanisms in place to help individuals and organizations help save places that matter to them?

    2. Are there obvious unmet needs for historic preservation, and if so, what are we doing to address them?

    3. Are we losing one particular resource, and if so, do we have a strategy for combating that loss?

    4. Is our organization strong, well-funded and do we have the necessary staff and leadership on board to make our work possible?

    The answers to these questions help us to understand the extent of our progress and where we must focus the work ahead.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Since our creation in 1931, the brief highlights of our impact include:

    Participated in the creation of the National Council of Historic Sites and Buildings – the predecessor to the National Trust for Historic Preservation (1947).

    Spearheaded the creation of Maryland's state historic rehab 20% tax credit – leveraging over $3 BILLION in private investment since its creation in 1997 – and saving thousands of historic structures.

    Provided nearly $1 million in grants, in partnership with the Maryland Historical Trust, via our Heritage Fund – enabling the completion of $16 million worth of projects.

    Advocated for the creation of Maryland's Heritage Area program – a recognized national model – that returns nearly $4 in economic activity for every $1 in state investment.

    Oversaw the rehabilitation of 27 priceless tobacco barns with Save America's Treasures funding.

    Funded the creation of dozens of historic districts in Baltimore City, in partnership with the Abell Foundation, via our Historic Communities Investment Fund.

    Coordinated 35 straight years of professional development seminars and conferences.

    Participated in countless pitched battles to defend Maryland history, including opposing an out-of-scale hotel in the Annapolis historic district (1967), defeating a planned Chestertown Wal-Mart (2001), opposition to the East-West Expressway in Baltimore's Inner Harbor (1966), supporting the expansion of the Antietam Battlefield boundaries (1992), opposition to the Baltimore Superblock (2010), efforts to save Whites Hall, Johns Hopkins boyhood home (2016), and many, many more.

    MOVING FORWARD: In the years ahead, we as an organization and movement must continue to grow and expand our base of support and find innovative ways to save important places. Increasingly our work has become more community focused, with a goal of adding to the vibrancy of a neighborhood a compelling and important component of our work. By saving historic places we are also making livable, sustainable communities for the 21st century.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Maryland

Maryland

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

Preservation Maryland is working diligently to expand our capacity, provide more technical and funding support to organizations across the state and to engage in proactive preservation efforts that help communities save places that matter before they are threatened by demolition. As a result, our major funding needs focus on these three broad areas: Capacity, Assistance & Proactive Solutions. SIX-TO-FIX: Preservation Maryland's Six-to-Fix program is an example of a program that combines all three funding needs. The goal of the innovative new program is simple: select six historic sites around the state on a yearly basis that could benefit from the assistance of Preservation Maryland and through a cooperative partnership with the applicant, put that site on a new trajectory towards a better state of preservation. At an approximate cost of $15,000 in staff time, expenses and other costs per Six-To-Fix project, generating financial support for the program is an important and challenging aspect of our yearly fundraising efforts. On average, the program costs nearly $100,000 per year to manage and execute. For more information on this year's selected sites, please visit: www.sixtofix.org HERITAGE FUND GRANTS: Each year, Preservation Maryland distributes nearly $100,000 in grants to deserving organizations across the state to help protect, save, enhance and interpret important pieces of Maryland's past. These grants also support worthwhile education efforts, advocacy work on behalf of threatened resources, and community development. Each year, the need increases exponentially and the funding available only provides for a fraction of the grants requested. As a result, the organization is working hard to secure additional funding for the highly successful program. Since its inception, the program has distributed over $1,000,000 worth of grants and leveraged over $16,000,000 worth of private investment -- equaling a 16:1 return on the program. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE: On a yearly basis the organization assists hundreds of organizations, individuals and partners with a myriad of preservation assistance. From directing individuals to craftsmen to assisting organizations with complex grant requests, we stand prepared to offer assistance wherever we can. Moving forward, there is a recognition that we must increase our visibility and capacity through the addition of a 'circuit riding' field representative that will be wholly tasked with technical assistance. In order to accomplish this, the organization must raise an additional $100,000 per year to cover the necessary costs of the project which will have visible impacts from Oakland to Ocean City.

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

THE SOCIETY FOR THE PRESERVATION OF MARYLAND ANTIQUITIES INC
Fiscal year: Oct 01-Sep 30

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Preservation Maryland

Leadership

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Executive Director

Mr. Nicholas Redding

BIO

Nicholas is responsible for overseeing the organization's day-to-day operations as well as its advocacy and programmatic initiatives, including Preservation Maryland's Six-to-Fix efforts. He serves as he voice of the organization and leads a statewide coalition of heritage organizations and non-profits to advance the work of Preservation Maryland.

A graduate of West Virginia's Shepherd University, prior to joining Preservation Maryland he oversaw the operations of Long Branch Plantation, a 400-acre 19th century historic site and working farm in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. Prior to Long Branch, he served for five years as a member of the staff of the Civil War Trust in Washington, DC working to preserve threatened battlefields. During his time spent at the Civil War Trust he oversaw a national campaign to prevent the establishment of a Gettysburg casino. He began his career in history and preservation as a Park Ranger at Gettysburg National Military Park and the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park.

STATEMENT FROM THE Executive Director

"It's been said that one of the great things about the National Park idea is that the work's never done – it's simply never finished. Each succeeding generation is called upon to steward these resources and to identify new places to preserve and pass to succeeding generations. The same could be said about historic preservation. The work is simply never done.

That's why Preservation Maryland exists. For over 80+ years we've carried the torch forward and have worked to save the places, communities and stories that define Maryland and make our state unique. Together, with dozens of partner organizations we are strengthening communities, saving history and making Maryland a great place to live and visit. "

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Anthony Azola

Azola Companies

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?