Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy

PUBLIC JUSTICE CENTER INC

  • Baltimore, MD
  • www.publicjustice.org

Mission Statement

The Public Justice Center (PJC) is one of Maryland's premiere nonprofit legal advocacy organizations. We work with people and communities to confront the laws, practices, and institutions that cause injustice, poverty, and discrimination. We advocate in the courts, legislatures, and government agencies, educate the public, and build coalitions, all to advance our mission of “pursuing systemic change to build a just society."

Main Programs

  1. PJC At A Glance
  2. Access to Health Care and Public Benefits
  3. Human Right to Housing Project
  4. Workplace Justice Project
  5. Education Stability Project

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1985

chief executive

Mr. John Nethercut

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

legal services, poverty, civil rights, advocacy, discrimination

Self-reported by organization

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013.
Register now

EIN

52-1412226

Physical Address

Public Justice Center One N. Charles Street, Suite 200

Baltimore, MD 21201 3740

Also Known As

PJC

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

Public Interest Law/Litigation (I83)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Current projects focus on (1) Representing, protecting and empowering low-income tenants who face eviction due to non-payment of rent or because of a landlord’s foreclosure, (2) low-wage workers who are misclassified as independent contractors, immigrants, (3) youth who are charged and incarcerated as adults, (4) homeless and foster children struggling to maintain school continuity, (5) families needing medical assistance, and (6) establishing a right to counsel in civil cases. In the past year, we have accomplished significant results. Some highlights include: building a cross-sector coalition of advocates, funders and school district personnel to investigate and resolve the obstacles that prevent homeless children from attending school; representing more than 700 tenants who faced eviction for nonpayment of rent or because their landlord was in foreclosure; launched a multi-pronged, multi-year campaign to end the automatic prosecution of youth as adults and sponsored a national conference of advocates working to establish a right to counsel in civil cases. For more details about our work and recent accomplishments, find our Annual Report and other publications on www.publicjustice.org.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

PJC At A Glance

The Public Justice Center works with people and communities to
confront the laws, practices, and institutions that cause injustice, poverty,
and discrimination. We advocate in the courts, legislatures, and government
agencies, educate the public, and build coalitions, all to advance our mission
of “pursuing systemic change to build a just society.” Since our inception, the PJC has worked on a spectrum of issues confronting people who live in poverty or who suffer discrimination. The PJC's current focus areas include homeless children's and foster children's rights to education stability, workers' rights, tenants' rights, prisoners' rights, access to health and public benefits, civil right to counsel and appellate advocacy. A few of these projects are described in further detail below. Descriptions for and accomplishments of all projects are available at www.publicjustice.org(http://www.publicjustice.org) .

Category

Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy

Budget

1,727,413

Population Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Program 2

Access to Health Care and Public Benefits

Too many people fall through the gaping holes in government "safety net" programs meant to help during difficult times. On behalf of people living poverty, we seek to protect and expand eligibility for and access to adequate public benefits and health care coverage

Category

Health Care

Budget

Population Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Program 3

Human Right to Housing Project

The Tenant Advocacy Project seeks to protect and expand tenants' rights to safe, habitable, affordable, and non-discriminatory housing, and to fair and equal treatment by Maryland's landlord-tenant laws, courts and agencies.

Category

Housing

Budget

Population Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Program 4

Workplace Justice Project

Robust labor laws are essential to eliminating the problems of poverty and inequality that plague the low-wage workforce. We work to prevent discrimination, support minimum or overtime wages, and prevent unsafe conditions.

Category

Employment

Budget

Population Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Program 5

Education Stability Project

Every time a child's housing changes -- or they become homeless or their foster care placement changes -- there is an immediate effect on their educational stability and success. If we can create school stability for such students, we can better help them to achieve academically and ultimately, we can help break the cycle of poverty.

Category

Education

Budget

Population Served

Homeless

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

Social Media

@https://www.facebook.com/publicjusticecenter?ref=ts&fref=ts

@https://twitter.com/PublJusticeCntr

@http://www.youtube.com/user/PublicJusticeCenter

Funding Needs

The Public Justice Center welcome donations to cover our general operating expenses. Contributions of this nature are important to the organization’s fiscal stability as they afford the flexibility to achieve systemic impact which often takes more time, creativity and resources unforeseen at a project’s beginning. We also use unrestricted contributions to take action when the opportunity is nigh (rather than waiting to secure designated funding,) to fill gaps when restricted funding ends before a project is completed, to allow for the use of advocacy tools (including legislative or administrative advocacy) that are prohibited by other donors and to represent clients who may not be currently popular. That said, we also welcome project-specific funding. Please contact us at (410)625-9409 if you are interested in making such a contribution.

Affiliations + Memberships

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member

American Bar Association

Videos

External Reviews

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits
Source: greatnonprofits.org

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

PUBLIC JUSTICE CENTER INC
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

PUBLIC JUSTICE CENTER INC

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Mr. John Nethercut

BIO

John Nethercut joined the PJC as the Executive Director in August 2002. He came to the PJC after 14 years with the Office of the Attorney General of Maryland, where he had been Deputy Chief of the Consumer Protection Division. Mr. Nethercut supervised complex litigation involving consumer fraud, appeals, legislation, and media and community relations for the Consumer Protection Division. Previously, Mr. Nethercut worked for seven years in legal services organizations in Indiana, Ohio, and upstate New York, where he represented tenants and tenant unions, community organizations, and farm workers. He is active in Baltimore's nonprofit community and housing development organizations. Mr. Nethercut received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1982, and a B.A. in Anthropology, with Honors, from Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana in 1978. He is a member of the 2005 Greater Baltimore Committee Leadership Class,  a graduate of the Weinberg Fellowship and a member of Maryland's Access to Justice Commission.

STATEMENT FROM THE CEO

"Behind every great mission there are remarkable people. The Public Justice Center is no exception. Spend a few minutes with any of our staff and you will know their dedication to this work. Meet our volunteers and donors and you will understand their motivation to support this important work. Read the stories of our clients and you will marvel at their courage to stand up against some pretty formidable  odds.

 

Throughout the Great Recession, as more and more people suffered the stark challenges of poverty, injustice and discrimination, our workload grew. We advocated on behalf of tenants who are facing eviction or health and safety threats to their housing, tenants  who are being evicted because of their landlord's foreclosure, workers who are illegally misclassified by their employers as independent contractors and those who are not paid for their work, and homeless students and foster children seeking access to public schools. These are real people who need real change.

 

Providing direct legal services is just not enough. We challenge the very laws, practices and institutions that perpetuate poverty, discrimination and injustice. To that end, we engage in impact cases, in the trial and appellate courts, engage in administrative advocacy, conduct public education campaigns, and bring the voice of our constituents to the  legislature and other decision makers. This is how we make real change happen. Real systemic change does not happen when we work alone. We continue to facilitate and participate in major advocacy coalitions and workgroups including the Rental Housing Coalition, Tenants in Foreclosure Workgroup, Medicaid Matters! Maryland, Just Kids Partnership, the Healthcare Reform Coordinating Counsel, and the National Coalition for a Civil Right to Counsel, just to name a few. We are co-counsel with, and receive financial and pro-bono support from, a number of private law firms."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Professor Thomas X. E. Glancy

Belsky, Weinberg & Horowitz, LLC

Term: June 2012 - June 2016

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?