Youth Development

Mentors, Inc.

  • Washington, DC
  • www.mentorsinc.org

Mission Statement

The mission of Mentors, Inc. is to increase the graduation rates and success of students enrolled in the District of Columbia's public high schools by pairing them with caring adult volunteers in structured and enriched mentoring relationships that promote their personal, academic and career development.

Main Programs

  1. High School mentoring
  2. Middle School Team Mentoring
  3. Enrichment Program
Service Areas

Self-reported

District of Columbia

We serve any youth enrolled in a D.C. public or charter high school.

ruling year

1988

Principal Officer since 2009

Self-reported

Ms. Deirdre Bagley

Keywords

Self-reported

mentors, teenagers, youth, college prep, scholarships, volunteerism, public schools, Washington DC

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Also Known As

Mentors, Inc.

EIN

52-1547224

 Number

0721138562

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Adult, Child Matching Programs (O30)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Single Organization Support (B11)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The total number of youth served in 2008 was 234 – a 6% increase over the previous year.     

In June, 89% of our 12th graders graduated; 70% of those are now enrolled in college, supported by $63,000 in Mentors, Inc. scholarships. 

Mentors, Inc. launched its middle school mentoring pilot at Sousa Middle School

We completed a year-long program evaluation which resulted in a staff restructuring that will improve ongoing relationship support to promote successful matches.

This year our goal is to serve 310 youth, 100 of whom will be children of incarcerated parents and 36 of whom will be a part of our middle school pilot.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

High School mentoring

Mentors, Inc. matches high school students with caring, adult mentors in one-on-one mentoring relationships based on gender, personality and shared interests. Relationships last a minimum of one year and are designed to support students for the duration of their high school careers.   Through a federal grant, we also specifically serve youth who have an incarcerated parent or family member. Each year, between 225 and 250 students are mentored through our program.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

Program 2

Middle School Team Mentoring

TEAM Mentor (Together Everyone Achieves More)

In September 2008, Mentors, Inc. launched its first middle school mentoring program, which will serve 36 students at Sousa Middle School.  TEAM Mentor is a team approach to mentoring: teams of three mentors (a teacher, a college student, and a community member) will be paired with groups of 12 students to form mentoring teams.  Teams will meet twice weekly for an entire school year.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Budget

Program 3

Enrichment Program

We strive to enhance student outcomes and strengthen the mentoring relationships by providing support and enrichment activities for our students in the following areas: college preparation, career exploration, life skills development and community service. We organize monthly group events that provide opportunities for mentor-student interaction in structured settings.  We also connect youth to internship, scholarship, career opportunities and other resources through our biweekly online newsletter, "Cool Ideas."

Scholarships

Each year, at our annual Anniversary Celebration and Graduation Banquet, we award college scholarships to graduating seniors.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

Service Areas

Self-reported

District of Columbia

We serve any youth enrolled in a D.C. public or charter high school.

Funding Needs

It takes tremendous resources to recruit mentors and provide the kind of quality support to students that Mentors, Inc. requires. Further, because we want to ensure the success of our students, we offer academic scholarships to graduating seniors annually.   Mentors, Inc. relies on the financial contributions of foundations, corporations and individuals to support its programming. We rely on the efforts of volunteers to help us improve our capacity to serve DC youth.

photos




External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

MENTORS, INC.
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Mentors, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Ms. Deirdre Bagley

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

"Unlike many other teen mentoring programs, which focus primarily on tutoring or college preparation, the primary goal of Mentors, Inc.’s program is to place caring, stable adults in the lives of city youth to encourage them to stay in school, help develop their potential, and make sure that they graduate with a plan for the next step in life. Having a caring adult in their lives can determine whether students engage in safe behaviors, stay in school, and make positive choices about their futures."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Lisa Mallory Hodge

ICF International

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?