Educational Institutions

American Indian College Fund

  • Denver, CO
  • www.collegefund.org

Mission Statement

The American Indian College Fund transforms Indian higher education by funding and creating awareness of the unique, community-based accredited tribal colleges and universities, offering students access to knowledge, skills, and cultural values which enhance their communities and the country as a whole.

Main Programs

  1. Scholarship Programs
  2. Sovereign Nations Scholarship Fund Endowment

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1989

chief executive for fy 2012

Ms. Cheryl Crazy Bull

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

Native American, Indian, college, university, scholarship, reservation, education, tribe, tribal

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

52-1573446

Physical Address

8333 Greenwood Boulevard

Denver, CO 80221 4488

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Scholarships, Student Financial Aid, Awards (B82)

Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (A23)

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Since 1989, the American Indian College Fund has awarded over 83,000 scholarships to American Indian students.  The Fund disbursed approximately $9.8 million in scholarships and tribal college support during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2011.  The American Indian College Fund is the nation's largest private provider of scholarships to American Indians.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Scholarship Programs

The Fund provides approximately 6,000 scholarships annually to American Indian students attending the nation's tribal colleges. Each scholarship awarded can mean the difference between a student receiving a college degree or dropping out. In survey after survey, scholarship recipients indicate that securing financial aid is the key factor contributing to their ability to attain their educational goals. Ninety-five percent of tribal college students applying to the American Indian College Fund demonstrate financial need. Thus, increasing the number of scholarships awarded each year is the Fund's first priority.

Category

Education

Budget

$5,600,000.00

Population Served

Native Americans/American Indians

Adults

Program 2

Sovereign Nations Scholarship Fund Endowment

The Sovereign Nations Scholarship Fund Endowment provides scholarships to American Indian students attending tribal and mainstream colleges for professional certifications, undergraduate, and graduate degrees.  The endowment goal is $10,000,000 of which $3,000,000 has been raised to date.

Category

Education

Budget

$700,000.00

Population Served

Native Americans/American Indians

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

Blog

The organization's Blog

Funding Needs

The American Indian College Fund accepts monetary and in-kind donations from corporations, foundations, tribal nations and tribal entities, and individuals for student scholarships and support of the nation's 33 accredited tribal colleges and universities.

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance

Charity Navigator

American Institute of Philanthropy

photos




External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

THE AMERICAN INDIAN COLLEGE FUND
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

American Indian College Fund

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Knowledge Base Search
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CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Ms. Cheryl Crazy Bull

BIO

Dr. Cheryl Crazy Bull (Sicangu Lakota), whose Lakota name Wacinyanpi Win means “they depend on her,” has more than 30 years of experience working in education for adults, higher education, and K-12 with Native American institutions. Dr. Crazy Bull is experienced with community and organization development with strong skills in strategic planning, assessment and evaluation, public relations, and fundraising. 
In addition to her experience with education, she has worked extensively with tribal economic development, entrepreneurship, and development of cultural arts and outreach programming. Dr. Crazy Bull has served as the President of Northwest Indian College (NWIC), a tribally-controlled institution located on the Lummi Nation in Washington.  During her tenure at NWIC, the college became a four-year degree-granting institution and completed substantial campus improvements, including seven new buildings as part of a capital campaign. Prior to joining NWIC, Dr. Crazy Bull served as the superintendent of St. Francis Indian School, and in several teaching and administrative capacities at Sinte Gleska University.
Dr. Crazy Bull graduated from the University of South Dakota with a B.A. in Business Management and South Dakota State University (SDSU) with a Master’s in Education Administration.

STATEMENT FROM THE CEO

"Tribal colleges have rewritten the history of Indian Education. For many Native people, education did not represent opportunity or hope; it represented a loss of identity and important knowledge based in our languages and relationships. Tribal colleges and universities restore that knowledge and rebuild relationships. Students at tribal colleges are among the most resilient, talented individuals in higher education today. They eagerly study, research, serve, and learn together. They overcome tremendous economic and personal obstacles in order to achieve their dreams of a higher education that provides them with both employment and the security of their rich tribal identity. Today this is even more important because economic policies and political approaches to social change are having a challenging impact on already impoverished tribal communities. Tribal college students with their talents and education can change the future of tribal nations. Our students hold the promise of opportunity and prosperity in their hearts and hands. I have witnessed how the resources of the friends and supporters of the American Indian College Fund made higher education possible for tribal college students. I have seen the many incredible improvements in human capital and physical capacity at the TCUs as a result of the investment of contributors in the Fund. As the incoming President of the American Indian College Fund, I look forward to creating more opportunities for investment in our tribal colleges and universities and most importantly in our students. I believe that the generosity of our contributors will continue to support the diversity of cultures represented by American Indian tribes that are such an important part of American democracy.
Pilamaya he, thank you, for your friendship, Wacinyanpi Win (They Depend on Her)
Cheryl Crazy Bull President, American Indian College Fund"

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Dr. Elmer Guy

Navajo Technical College

Term: July 2011 - July 2013

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?