Educational Institutions

American Indian College Fund

  • Denver, CO
  • www.collegefund.org

Mission Statement

The American Indian College Fund transforms Indian higher education by funding and creating awareness of the unique, community-based accredited tribal colleges and universities, offering students access to knowledge, skills, and cultural values which enhance their communities and the country as a whole.

Main Programs

  1. Scholarship Programs
  2. Student Success Services
  3. Wakanyeka "Sacred Little Ones" Early Childhood Development Initative
  4. Cultural Preservation
  5. Building Sustainable Pathways

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1989

chief executive for fy 2012

Dr. Cheryl Crazy Bull

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

Native American, Indian, college, university, scholarship, reservation, education, tribe, tribal

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

52-1573446

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Scholarships, Student Financial Aid, Awards (B82)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Rural (S32)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Since 1989, the American Indian College Fund has awarded over 83,000 scholarships to American Indian students.  The Fund disbursed approximately $9.8 million in scholarships and tribal college support during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2011.  The American Indian College Fund is the nation's largest private provider of scholarships to American Indians.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Scholarship Programs

Over 25 years, the American Indian College Fund has provided more than 100,000 scholarships to Native American students seeking a college education. In 2014-15, the College Fund awarded more than 6,400 scholarships to 3,988 American Indian and Alaska Native students. Scholarships are awarded to Native students pursuing post-secondary credentials at all levels at both tribal and mainstream colleges and universities.The College Fund is the nation's largest provider of private scholarships for American Indian and Alaska Native students, and the core mission of our work supports the 35 member tribal college institutions. The College Fund's goal is simple: 60 percent of College Fund scholarship and internship recipients will have earned a post-secondary credential by 2024. Additionally, our organization has a goal of doubling the amount of scholarships by 2024.

Category

Budget

Population Served

Native Americans/American Indians

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Other Named Groups

Program 2

Student Success Services

The College Fund is undertaking significant efforts to expand our scholar support services in an effort to better promote student success and career readiness. This program administers specialized programmatic services including internships, career advice, professional conference attendance, award banquets, and more. Additionally, we are committed to sharing information and resources with TCUs in order to increase local internship and career opportunities. The College Fund also continues to expand our Circle of Scholars Program, a network created to engage and support past and present scholars with the organization and our donors beyond their time as a scholarship recipient. The College Fund seeks to create a thriving alumni community where all members have the resources necessary to become successful and engaged citizens who are well-equipped to achieve their educational, professional, and personal goals.

Category

Budget

Population Served

Native Americans/American Indians

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Other Named Groups

Program 3

Wakanyeka "Sacred Little Ones" Early Childhood Development Initative

This program is focused on strengthening early childhood educational opportunities for Native children and families. Four tribal colleges and their respective tribal partners are leading the way by developing programs that address family engagement, incorporate Native language and culture, strengthen instructional quality, increase young children's skill development, and bridge Pre-K experiences with K-3 education. The impact of these funded programs include increasing research-based practices, improving teacher education and training, and increasing opportunities for Native communities to shape educational access and opportunities from birth and beyond into higher education pathways. This initiative represents the breadth and scope of the College Fund's work toward ensuring a quality educational environment for American Indians.

Category

Budget

Population Served

Native Americans/American Indians

Other Named Groups

Infants/Babies (under age 5)

Program 4

Cultural Preservation

The College Fund continues to partner with funders and TCUs to help preserve traditional Native culture. The College Fund received a National Endowment for the Humanities grant that supports cultural preservation and revitalization efforts at 24 TCUs. The endowment provides an annual grant of equal amount to the 24 participating TCUs to be spent on cultural preservation, perpetuation, and revitalization efforts. In addition, the Anheuser Busch Foundation's Cultural Preservation Program was initiated in early 2014 to provide one-time annual awards to selected TCUs for the purpose of supporting cultural preservation. The award is intended to be used by the selected school to accomplish a previously unsupported strategy toward preserving cultural practices, language, arts, or any activity deemed to be of cultural nature by the TCU and the community it serves.

Category

Budget

Population Served

Native Americans/American Indians

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Other Named Groups

Program 5

Building Sustainable Pathways

The Building Sustainability Pathways Program is currently funding Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs) and faculty fellowships in North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin and Minnesota, and student fellowships and summer internships in North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Montana.The program allows TCUs to create environmental sustainability programming at their institutions and to expand existing programs.

Category

Budget

Population Served

Native Americans/American Indians

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Other Named Groups

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

Funding Needs

The American Indian College Fund provides Native people with access to education so they can overcome the debilitating effects of poverty and give back to their communities. While Native people have made significant socioeconomic advances in recent decades, American Indians are more likely to live in poverty and have lower educational attainment rates than the rest of the American public. American Indians and Alaska Natives are the most underprivileged racial or ethnic group in the U.S. Natives comprise only 1 percent of all college students, and only 13% earn a college degree in their lifetime. Less than 5% of Native people can afford to attend college without financial assistance. Through higher education, American Indian and Alaska Native students are afforded access to increased job opportunities and higher earning potentials; a recent report released by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce found that individuals with a B.A. earn 84 percent more over a lifetime than those with only a high school diploma. Moreover, 39% of all the students who receive educational support from the College Fund are first generation college students.Our success in supporting Native students clearly demonstrates how we are meeting the needs of our constituents.

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance

Charity Navigator

American Institute of Philanthropy

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

THE AMERICAN INDIAN COLLEGE FUND
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

American Indian College Fund

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone and website
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Dr. Cheryl Crazy Bull

BIO

Dr. Cheryl Crazy Bull (Sicangu Lakota), whose Lakota name Wacinyanpi Win means “they depend on her,” has more than 30 years of experience working in education for adults, higher education, and K-12 with Native American institutions. Dr. Crazy Bull is experienced with community and organization development with strong skills in strategic planning, assessment and evaluation, public relations, and fundraising.  In addition to her experience with education, she has worked extensively with tribal economic development, entrepreneurship, and development of cultural arts and outreach programming. Dr. Crazy Bull has served as the President of Northwest Indian College (NWIC), a tribally-controlled institution located on the Lummi Nation in Washington.  During her tenure at NWIC, the college became a four-year degree-granting institution and completed substantial campus improvements, including seven new buildings as part of a capital campaign. Prior to joining NWIC, Dr. Crazy Bull served as the superintendent of St. Francis Indian School, and in several teaching and administrative capacities at Sinte Gleska University. Dr. Crazy Bull graduated from the University of South Dakota with a B.A. in Business Management and South Dakota State University (SDSU) with a Master’s in Education Administration.

STATEMENT FROM THE CEO

"There are two Americas today. In the first America, people freely pursue their dreams. The other America barely survives in the shadows of the first, unseen and unheard and mostly forgotten, in American Indian communities. American Indians face many challenges to getting a college degree or education. The result is that few American Indians enter college and graduate. Just look at the facts: Native youth face some of the lowest high school graduation rates nationwide.Only 1% of American Indians are enrolled in college.Natives have the lowest educational attainment rates of all ethnic and racial groups. Less than 13% of American Indian and Alaska Native earned a college degree, compared to 28% of other racial groups. But there is hope. At the American Indian College Fund we know the solution to ending poverty is a tribal college education. In my 30-year career as an educator, my work has been inspired by the vision of the founders of the tribal college movement. These accredited institutions of post-secondary education provide academic, career, and technical curricula to Native people alongside opportunities to learn their language, culture, and history. Tribal colleges are strategically located on or near American Indian reservations, allowing people who cannot afford to leave the reservation the opportunity to get a quality education. The American Indian College Fund, a 501(c)(3) organization, has a record of more than 25 years of success. We recruit, prepare, and provide students with financial access to a post-secondary education while supporting programs and initiatives at the tribal colleges to help them succeed. Thanks to your support, our students can look forward to a future of prosperity for themselves, their families, and their communities. Pilamaya he, thank you, for your friendship, Wacinyanpi Win (They Depend on Her)"

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Dr. Elmer Guy

Navajo Technical College

Term: July 2011 - July 2013

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?