Educational Institutions

Capital Partners for Education

  • Washington, DC
  • http://www.cpfe.org

Mission Statement

Capital Partners for Education (CPE) provides a structured continuum of one-on-one mentoring, academic support, and career preparation services to low-income high school and college students from the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, guiding them to and through college, and into sustainable career paths

Main Programs

  1. Mentoring
  2. College and Career Programs
  3. Scholarships
Service Areas

Self-reported

District of Columbia

Capital Partners for Education (CPE) serves low-income high school students in the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan area.

ruling year

1993

Chief Executive Officer since 2001

Self-reported

Mr. Khari Brown

Keywords

Self-reported

mentoring, scholarship, high school, college, low-income, youth program, education

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Also Known As

CPE

EIN

52-1832497

 Number

0332601140

Physical Address

1413 K Street NW Third Floor

Washington, DC 20005

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

Scholarships, Student Financial Aid, Awards (B82)

Scholarships, Student Financial Aid, Awards (B82)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

CPE was founded in 1993 on the conviction that low-income students in the academic middle could break the cycle of poverty in their families if they were matched with college-educated volunteer mentors, provided with high-quality educations, and aided in their college application and enrollment processes. From the beginning, CPE's college access program has paired each student with a college-educated mentor for at least two years. In our first year, CPE supported six students enrolled in D.C. private schools on their journeys to college.

CPE has expanded dramatically from 112 students in in the 2012-13 academic year to an expected enrollment of up to 415 students in the 2016-17 academic year.

The low-income students enrolled in CPE's mentoring programs are attendees or graduates of Washington, DC area high schools. Many of the current 74 participating college students attend college outside of Washington, D.C., even though they graduated from local high schools. Eighty percent of CPE students are first-generation to college, 99% are students of color, and 100% are considered low-income with an average median income of $32,000 for a family of four in 2015.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Mentoring

Providing students with a caring and consistent role model, resource, and adult friend is perhaps the greatest support that CPE provides. For many CPE students, their mentor may be the only adult they know (aside from their teacher) who has successfully completed college. As such, these mentors are a valuable resource to help students along the path to college enrollment and completion. CPE matches every student with an adult mentor, who makes a minimum two-year commitment to work one-on-one with a student through weekly check-ins and monthly outings. CPE staff also keeps close track of each student to ensure they are thriving in their school and home environments, and meeting their full potential. With the help of supportive adults, students are able to navigate the challenges of high school successfully.

Category

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Young Adults (20-25 years)

Budget

Program 2

College and Career Programs

While our students have access to strong college preparatory educations and caring high school communities, they don’t always have the skills, habits, and support networks necessary to thrive in these environments and successfully go on to college.  CPE programs are specifically designed to ensure that students are prepared to take on high school, while preparing for success in college and their career. Programming through school visits, workshops, and events helps bring the abstract concepts of “college” and “professional careers” into focus for our students, while ensuring that they have the social and life skills necessary to successfully transition into adulthood.

Category

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Young Adults (20-25 years)

Budget

Program 3

Scholarships

CPE partners with 19 leading area private high schools and two high-performing charter schools. All partners have strong college preparatory curricula. CPE offers each private school student up to $4,500 annually in scholarship assistance and access to emergency funds for school expenses. Each charter school student receives $1,000 annual college scholarships, free uniforms, Metro cards and access to emergency funds for school expenses. Partner schools work closely with CPE around students' financial aid, academic progress and social adjustment.

Category

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Young Adults (20-25 years)

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    CPE's goals are to ensure that all our students earn a high school diploma and college degree, and that they are all equipped with the skills needed to secure sustainable employment and succeed in the new economy. Primary measures of success include: high school graduation, college enrollment, college persistence, and college graduation, the latter of which is tracked through the National Student Clearinghouse. By 2020, roughly 76% of DC area jobs will require a college degree. Without this credential, low-income students cannot access the high-wage, high-growth jobs required to break the multi-generational cycle of poverty.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    In 2012, CPE's Board of Directors approved a three-year strategic plan to expand the scale of CPE's mentoring program, both in terms of numbers of students served and the duration of mentoring relationships. Our program has grown from 182 students in academic year 2014-15 to up to 415 students enrolled in 2016-17, representing a 42.7% annual growth rate, which has come without sacrificing our outcomes.

    CPE's mentoring, academic support, and career preparation services are featured in three program lines: (1) The Trailblazers, our ninth-grade high school program for low-income students in DC-area private, charter, and public schools; (2) The Navigators, our 11th grade high school program for students enrolled in DC-based charter and public schools; and (3) The Transformers, our college program, for graduates of the Trailblazer and Navigator programs. Graduates of our high school program enjoy a 97% college enrollment rate and a 70% college completion rate, more than three times the national rate and five times the rate in Washington, DC. Today, 74 Transformers are enrolled across 50 colleges. In 2016, we expect 77 CPE high school graduates to enter college and participate in this program.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Many organizations focus on college access for low-income students. CPE's differentiator and principal area of strength is that we facilitate long-term, intensive 1:1 mentoring relationships between our students and mentors. CPE carefully selects and trains college-educated volunteer mentors to serve as role models, resources and advocates for our students. Mentors give our students the emotional, social and academic guidance they would otherwise lack, as well as access to professional networks that would typically be out of reach. Mentors commit to a 2-year relationship and many exceed that requirement. CPE's other differentiator is that our program focuses on college completion and career development. We are one of the first D.C. organizations to offer college-level mentoring. Moving forward, we are refining our program to focus on access to sustainable careers with local corporate partners through our Corporate Engagement Model (CEM).

    CPE's school, community, and corporate partners help us realize our mission of enabling low-income students to enroll in and complete college at higher rates than the national average.

    School Partners: CPE's strongest partners are local high schools attended by our students. Schools enable us to recruit students, monitor academic and social adjustments, and promote college matriculation. CPE partners with 19 DC area public, private, and charter high schools.

    Corporate Partners: CPE's corporate partners provide college and career programming to our students, enabling them to obtain counsel from a professional network they otherwise lack. Sixty-one partner companies participated in our annual career fair. Partners provide pro bono services such as strategic planning, human resources, and technology improvements. Our Corporate Advisory Council advises on fundraising and corporate engagement opportunities.

    In early 2016, CPE debuted our Corporate Engagement Model to promote deeper relationships between our corporate partners and students. The CEM will improve cross-sector career exposure for students through job shadow days, internships, career affinity groups (e.g., STEM), and soft skills development. We are in active discussions with local companies to show that by working with CPE, they can help lift our students towards family-sustaining careers.

    Community Partners: Collaborations with peer organizations help us augment program offerings and extend our programming to a wider set of low-income students not formally involved in our program. Partners include Higher Achievement, College Summit, Urban Alliance, Washington Jesuit Academy, College Success Foundation, and For Love of Children.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    To ensure progress towards our goals, CPE regularly collects and analyzes data through student and mentor rubrics, a data collection calendar, and analysis instruments. Rubrics are based on college persistence benchmarks and non-cognitive skill development, and are tracked on a weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, quarterly, and annual basis. CPE tracks student-mentor communication and reviews monthly surveys from students and mentors on challenges, needs, and progress. Our partner schools provide data on student attendance, behavior, and academic performance at least quarterly. CPE monitors all data to identify students' problems as soon as they develop, making it easier for us to intervene, improve, or change course when needed.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Over the past 22 years, CPE has been making a college degree possible for motivated low-income students living in the Washington, DC area by helping them overcome the academic and social barriers that would otherwise prevent them from attending and succeeding in the colleges of their choice. By complementing the rigorous education in some of DC's top high schools with additional wrap-around services, CPE levels the playing field between our students and their upper-income peers, thereby breaking the multigenerational cycle of poverty one family at a time.
Service Areas

Self-reported

District of Columbia

Capital Partners for Education (CPE) serves low-income high school students in the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan area.

Social Media

Funding Needs

All donations made to CPE directly support our holistic program model that provides students a unique combination of mentoring, and college and career readiness programming, and academic tuition CPE board member donations cover the full costs of its administrative expenses. As a result, all donations received are applied directly to the program.

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

CAPITAL PARTNERS FOR EDUCATION, INC.
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Capital Partners for Education

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Khari Brown

BIO

Khari Brown has served as the Executive Director at Capital Partners for Education (CPE) since 2001 and in November 2015 was renamed as its Chief Executive Officer. Beginning as its only employee, Mr. Brown has built CPE from a niche program that reached only 100 students and mentors per year to a burgeoning organization with multiple program lines that is currently serving more than 700 students and mentors and has been growing by more than 30% annually since 2012. By developing CPE's program offerings to make it the D.C. region's most holistic and comprehensive mentoring program, CPE has been remarkably successful in helping its students overcome the barriers that limit most low-income students. Under Mr. Brown's leadership CPE has seen 97% of its graduates enroll in college and nearly 75% complete college on time.

Mr. Brown received both a Bachelor's degree in American Studies and a Master's degree in Education from Tufts University. A two-time captain of the Tufts basketball team, he played professional basketball in Helsinki, Finland upon graduating from college. After his playing career ended in 1995, Mr. Brown spent six years coaching high school and college basketball in the Boston area. He also owned and operated a fitness and sports performance business serving individual clients and offering clinics and camps for high school and college athletes. Mr. Brown's involvement working with urban teens through his various coaching experiences led him to pursue a career in expanding educational opportunities for low-income youth.

Mr. Brown and his wife are the proud parents of two children who attend DC Public Schools.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

The Honorable Mary K. Bush

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?