Youth Development

Washington Tennis & Education Foundation, Inc.

  • Washington, DC
  • www.wtef.org

Mission Statement

WTEF seeks to improve the life prospects of DC area youth, particularly those from low-income, high-crime communities, through education as well as tennis and life skills activities that teach discipline, build confidence, and improve academic performance.

Main Programs

  1. Arthur Ashe Children's Program
  2. Center for Excellence
  3. WTEF Community Programs
  4. Summer Program
Service Areas

Self-reported

District of Columbia

WTEF serves at-risk children and youth in Washington, DC. We conduct programs at our Northwest Campus, East Capitol Campus and at 22 public schools in DC's Wards 5, 6, 7 and 8. Our participants are 95% African American, 5% other; 55% female, 45% male; ages 2-18; predominantly from low-income neighborhoods. 

ruling year

1956

President since 2005

Self-reported

Eleni Rossides

Keywords

Self-reported

youth,children,education,academics,tennis,after-school,after school,Washington, DC,at-risk,disadvantaged, sports, life skills, college preparation

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Also Known As

WTEF

EIN

52-6046504

 Number

0384918276

Physical Address

East Capitol Campus 200 Stoddert Pl SE

Washington, DC 20019

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Physical Fitness/Community Recreational Facilities (N30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Since its establishment WTEF has provided a safe haven, academic support and positive relationships for hundreds of DC children who contend daily with the impact of poverty on their academic achievement and personal development. Since opening our East Capitol Campus in a distressed neighborhood of Washington, DC, WTEF has more than doubled the number served with a demonstrated track record of success. For example, our 65 percent student retention rate is 20 points higher than the national average among high-performing organizations. The East Capitol Campus includes three classrooms, a community room, six indoor and nine outdoor tennis courts, as well as staff offices.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Arthur Ashe Children's Program

An after-school program combining tennis, academics, and life skills activities to help at-risk DC youth. The AACP is conducted at 22 schools in distressed neighborhoods in Northeast and Southeast Washington, DC. The program operates four days a week from 3:30 - 5:30 p.m.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

None

Budget

$647,000

Program 2

Center for Excellence

An intensive academic and tennis program for students in grades 1-12, meeting five days a week during the academic year. CFE students receive academic testing and curriculum, mentoring and counseling, tennis instruction, and tennis competition.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

None

Budget

$772,000

Program 3

WTEF Community Programs

A range of programs that serve DC residents from pre-school through adults at our East Capitol Center. Our flagship community program is Tennis Tots, which provides free, weekly tennis lessons to children ages 2-5 who attend pre-schools in Ward 7; the program contributes to kindergarten readiness for 350 children a year. We also provide free weekly tennis classes to 100 students at the SEED Public Charter School and serve as a resource for adults with free classes in tennis and Zumba, health outreach services and a gathering space for community groups.

Category

Recreation & Sports

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Adults

None

Budget

$411,116

Program 4

Summer Program

Athletics -focused summer program held from 8-4 every weekday from the week after school ends through mid-August. The emphasis is on learning and playing tennis, with two hours a day devoted to independent reading or tutoring in math and reading.

Category

Recreation & Sports

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

$218,000

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Our goals are to (1) provide a safe place for children and youth during risky afterschool hours; (2) improve their educational skills and future prospects; and (3) increase their physical activity and wellness. In the long term, WTEF seeks to empower students to achieve their highest potential by helping them develop meaningful values and critical life skills that will lead them to make constructive life choices.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    WTEF uses best practices in afterschool programming. Thirty years of research on afterschool programs have identified indicators that make a high quality program; these include challenging activities, quality homework time, staff engagement, positive youth engagement, family relationships, and appropriate space. WTEF is one of a handful of only four afterschool organizations in the District that score high on all six indicators.

    The program design is based on a large body of research that shows a strong link between academics and exercise. Physically active students have been found to score higher on standardized tests and get better grades, particularly in math and reading. A report in 2013 by the United States Tennis Association shows that tennis in particular provides a unique advantage; tennis players spend more time doing homework, get better grades, have college aspirations and significantly lower rates of disciplinary measures than other students. WTEF believes that tennis fosters values that can change the life of a child – values such as resilience, grit, perseverance, optimism and conscientiousness.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    An experienced team of professional educators and tennis coaches works with children and youth to build their academic, life skills and tennis skills.

    Our Board of Directors includes leading business men and women from the community, who provide strategic direction and financial oversight.

    An experienced executive staff guides day-to-day operations.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    WTEF staff uses a specialized database to collect data for all of our programs and students. Our evaluation metrics cover program intensity, continuity, locality, connectivity, and student profiles. Among key data we collect and analyze are student enrollment, attendance, and retention; neighborhoods served; parental engagement; student grades, and promotion. We also regularly seek input from front-line personnel and conduct a year-end survey of students and teachers.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    We have established a remarkable record of success. For the past 16 years, all of the high school seniors in our Center for Excellence Program have graduated and gone on to college or university, often with academic and/or athletic scholarships. More than 97% of the students in our Arthur Ashe Children's Program advance to the next grade every year.

    We know, however, that there are many more children and youth who need our help.
Service Areas

Self-reported

District of Columbia

WTEF serves at-risk children and youth in Washington, DC. We conduct programs at our Northwest Campus, East Capitol Campus and at 22 public schools in DC's Wards 5, 6, 7 and 8. Our participants are 95% African American, 5% other; 55% female, 45% male; ages 2-18; predominantly from low-income neighborhoods. 

Social Media

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External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

WASHINGTON TENNIS & EDUCATION FOUNDATION
Fiscal year: Sep 01-Aug 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Washington Tennis & Education Foundation, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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President

Eleni Rossides

BIO

A native Washingtonian, Eleni Rossides graduated from Stanford University then went on the women's professional tennis tour for nine years. Subsequently, she got her Master's degree in Business Administration from The Kellogg School of Business at Northwestern University. After several years as a consultant with McKinsey & Co. she became the Executive Director of WTEF in 2005.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Dalbert B. Ginsberg

Ginsberg Helfer & Boyd, PLLC

Term: Jan 2015 - Dec 2016

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?