Environmental Quality Protection, Beautification

Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Inc.

  • ANNAPOLIS, MD
  • www.cbf.org

Mission Statement

Our Mission
Save the Bay™, and keep it saved, as defined by reaching a 70 on CBF's Health Index.

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation's (CBF) mission, simply stated, is to Save the Bay and keep it saved. We define a Saved Bay as having a score of 70 (out of 100) on CBF's State of the Bay health index. Thanks largely to a dramatic reduction in the amount of pollution entering the system, at 70, the Chesapeake Bay and its tributary rivers will be highly productive and in good health as measured by established water-quality standards. The result will be clear water, free of impacts from toxic contaminants, and healthy oxygen levels, able to support living resources in all parts of the Bay.

Main Programs

  1. Restoration
  2. Environmental Education
  3. Litigation
  4. Advocacy
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

We serve the Chesapeake Bay watershed which covers 64,000 square miles across six states (Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New York, West Virginia) and the District of Columbia.

ruling year

1966

President

Self-reported

Mr. William C. Baker

Keywords

Self-reported

BaySavers, Save the Bay, Chesapeake Bay, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, CBF, Estuary, Watershed, Protection, Restoration, Environmental, Education, Pollution

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EIN

52-6065757

Also Known As

CBF

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

Environmental Quality, Protection, and Beautification N.E.C. (C99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

CBF is the only environmental organization that works throughout the entire Chesapeake watershed, setting the agenda, serving as watchdog, and speaking out on behalf of the Chesapeake Bay to business, government, and the public. CBF's Environmental Education Program introduces K-12 students, teachers, and principals to the wonders of the watershed and works to heighten sensitivity, increase knowledge, and empower this sub-section of the Bay’s citizenry to take positive action for the Bay's restoration. With its Environmental Protection and Restoration Program, CBF restores the Bay's essential habitats and filtering mechanisms, such as forests, wetlands, underwater grasses, and oysters, through a variety of hands-on projects. Under its Litigation Program, CBF uses legal means, when necessary, to force compliance with existing environmental laws. Through its Advocacy Program, CBF fights for strong and effective laws and regulations and works cooperatively with government, business, and citizens in partnerships to protect and restore the Bay and its rivers and streams.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Restoration

CBF protects and restores the Chesapeake Bay through advocacy, litigation, and restoration. CBF's advocacy efforts are designed to help states implement plans to restore the Bay and hold states and the federal government accountable for staying on the course of restoration. Through CBF's restoration work, we aim to improve the capacity of rivers, streams and the Bay to treat pollution by protecting and restoring the Bay's natural filters through hands-on projects: building shoreline buffers, planting trees and shrubs, and raising oysters.

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Program 2

Environmental Education

CBF's award-winning environmental educators lead more than 35,000 students, teachers, and principals on hands-on field experiences and work with partners to develop systemic environmental literacy programs.

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Program 3

Litigation

Not available

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Program 4

Advocacy

Not available

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Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    2015 Goal:

    By 2015, the federal government with state cooperation will be fully enforcing the Clean Water Act and all other federal statutes applying to the Chesapeake Bay watershed system's environmental health and productivity. A precedent-setting program for pollution reduction will have been developed and will be enforced. Enforcing these laws and regulations will ensure the "delisting" of the Bay, the equivalent of a 40 on CBF's Health Index, because of the resulting reduction of nitrogen to 175 million pounds per year and phosphorus to 14.1 million pounds per year.

    Objective:

    CBF will conduct an integrated, inspirational, and comprehensive campaign to empower, encourage, and facilitate citizen pressure on government to meet the vision for the Bay. Although we understand that real change must take place at the state and local levels, we believe that it is most efficient for CBF to exert primary pressure on ensuring that EPA is fulfilling its statutory duties to make the nation's waters "fishable and swimmable." If EPA enforces the law, the states will be required to meet various benchmarks, which will be accomplished only if they hold local government accountable for pollution reduction as well.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Strategies:
    1.Educate—CBF will educate the general public, school administrators, teachers, and students about the wonders of the Chesapeake Bay system, its historic productivity, its current challenges, and solutions to restore it to at least 40 percent of its legendary potential. Education will serve as a means to citizen engagement and behavior change.
    2.Advocate—CBF will advocate for implementation of scientifically valid solutions to pressing water-quality problems throughout the Bay system. Drawing on the beneficial results of CBF educational efforts, we will engage adults and young people in a campaign to see that good laws and regulations are developed, introduced, passed, and enforced.
    3.Litigate—CBF will use litigation strategically to expose and rectify the most egregious cases of noncompliance with environmental laws and regulations.
    4.Restore—CBF will actively engage in restoration efforts in order to provide demonstrable, specific, on-the-ground water-quality improvements and engage volunteers and decision makers.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    CBF has a staff of approximately 185 employees working in offices in Annapolis and Easton, Maryland; Richmond and Norfolk, Virginia; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; and Washington, D.C. These staff are experts in education, advocacy, litigation, and restoration and many have been acknowledge as such—receiving awards and honors recognizing their prominence in their respective fields. We have 15 field education program locations and a fleet of vehicles and vessels that we use for restoration and education, including skiffs, 40-ft workboats, and custom-designed oyster restoration vessels, such as the most technologically advanced oyster restoration vessel on the Bay, the R/V Patricia Campbell. CBF has an annual budget of approximately $21 million. Our work is supported by more than 200,000 members and e-subscribers, including more than 28,000 volunteers who donate more than 56,000 hours of their time every year.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    The Chesapeake Bay Foundation Board of Trustees is responsible for assessing the organization’s effectiveness at least every two years. The evaluation may include internal effectiveness and external results.

    Measuring effectiveness is to take into account performance in reaching strategic goals and objectives in the following organizational areas:

    1. Program impact and outcomes.
    2. Visibility (including the ability to get the word out and attract donors and constituents).
    3. Financial stability.
    4. Staff qualifications, tenure and turnover.

    The Board will recommend specific actions that may need to be taken by either the Board and/or staff to reach its established strategic goals and objectives.

    Indicators specific to our Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint work:
    CBF closely monitors the two-year milestones committed to by states as part of the Blueprint. CBF releases a milestone report every two years and makes it available on our website at cbf.org/milestones.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    2014 ACCOMPLISHMENTS
    We are now closer than ever to saving the Chesapeake Bay.

    The Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint, a federal/state partnership and clean-up protocol that contains specific pollution reduction targets and deadlines, is working! Below are a few highlights of our recent strides in restoring clean water to the Bay watershed and improving the quality of life for the Bay watershed’s 17 million residents:

    •To defend the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint from being overturned, CBF has launched a strategic response to the appeal by The Farm Bureau and its special interest groups and their recruitment of attorneys general from 21 states. CBF is bolstering our legal defense and rallying public support for the Blueprint. We know who is on our side: Virginia, Maryland, Delaware; the District of Columbia; seven American cities, including Baltimore, New York, Chicago, and San Francisco; a group of 19 prominent law professors; and 27 environmental groups from across the country. All have filed briefs in support of clean water. Plus, 46,000 people have signed CBF’s online petition opposing the war on the Blueprint.
    •In Maryland, CBF and our partners defeated 20 bills that sought to repeal or weaken polluted run-off management programs. Critical funds were committed to reduce this pollution, which erodes streambanks, kills fish, and puts health at risk.
    •During the Virginia General Assembly session, CBF worked to thwart proposed legislation that attempted to delay, dilute, or derail the state’s new polluted runoff management program. A compromise was reached that allows new, more stringent stormwater management practices to go into effect statewide. CBF continues to advocate for funding to install stormwater management projects and agricultural best management practices.
    •In Pennsylvania, CBF is working with the legislature and the Governor to ensure that the Commonwealth continues to make the needed investments in local rivers and streams as well as in conservation programs. In addition, CBF has begun to expand our grassroots constituency – with a specific goal of activating Pennsylvania residents in support of the Blueprint.
    •Engaged more than 30,000 students, teachers, principals, and decision-makers through hands-on environmental education experiences with CBF’s 15 environmental education programs—educating them about the health of the Bay and solutions to restore it and encouraging clean water actions.
    •Planted 28.9 million baby oysters on sanctuary reefs through throughout the watershed. Each of those oysters will filter and clean up to 50 gallons of water a day.
    •Nearly 500 volunteers planted 12,700 trees and native wetland grasses. These buffers will reinforce streambanks, provide habitat, help stabilize water temperatures, and filter and absorb pollution.
    •Worked with nearly 100 organizations and 6,000 volunteers to remove 110,000 pounds of debris from over 450 miles of streams and shoreline in Virginia.
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

We serve the Chesapeake Bay watershed which covers 64,000 square miles across six states (Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New York, West Virginia) and the District of Columbia.

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

As a member-supported not-for-profit organization, CBF relies on the financial support of individuals, corporations, foundations, and grant-making agencies to fund our activities.

Videos

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

CHESAPEAKE BAY FOUNDATION INC
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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President

Mr. William C. Baker

BIO

William C. Baker, Baltimore, MD – has been the President of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation since 1982. Mr. Baker serves on the boards of Brown Advisory & Trust Company, Central Maryland Transportation Alliance, Clayton Fund, Garden Club of America, Institute for the Venice Lagoon, Hopkins, Open Society Institute – Baltimore, and the University of Maryland Baltimore County.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Simon Sidamon-Eristoff

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?