Environmental Quality Protection, Beautification

Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Inc.

  • ANNAPOLIS, MD
  • cbf.org

Mission Statement

Our Mission
Save the Bay™, and keep it saved, as defined by reaching a 70 on CBF's Health Index.

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation's (CBF) mission, simply stated, is to Save the Bay and keep it saved. We define a Saved Bay as having a score of 70 (out of 100) on CBF's State of the Bay health index. Thanks largely to a dramatic reduction in the amount of pollution entering the system, at 70, the Chesapeake Bay and its tributary rivers will be highly productive and in good health as measured by established water-quality standards. The result will be clear water, free of impacts from toxic contaminants, and healthy oxygen levels, able to support living resources in all parts of the Bay.

Main Programs

  1. Restoration
  2. Environmental Education
  3. Litigation
  4. Advocacy and Educating the Public
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

We serve the Chesapeake Bay watershed which covers 64,000 square miles across six states (Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New York, West Virginia) and the District of Columbia.

ruling year

1966

President

Self-reported

Mr. William C. Baker

Keywords

Self-reported

Save the Bay, Chesapeake Bay, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, CBF, Estuary, Watershed, Protection, Restoration, Environmental, Education, Pollution

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Also Known As

CBF

EIN

52-6065757

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

CBF is the only environmental organization that works throughout the entire Chesapeake watershed, setting the agenda, serving as watchdog, and speaking out on behalf of the Chesapeake Bay to business, government, and the public. CBF's Environmental Education Program introduces K-12 students, teachers, and principals to the wonders of the watershed and works to heighten sensitivity, increase knowledge, and empower this sub-section of the Bay's citizenry to take positive action for the Bay's restoration. With its Environmental Protection and Restoration Program, CBF restores the Bay's essential habitats and filtering mechanisms, such as forests, wetlands, underwater grasses, and oysters, through a variety of hands-on projects. Under its Litigation Program, CBF uses legal means, when necessary, to force compliance with existing environmental laws. CBF raises public awareness through print and online communications, by appearing in the media, and through social media. Through its Advocacy Program, CBF fights for strong and effective laws and regulations and works cooperatively with government, business, and citizens in partnerships to protect and restore the Bay and its rivers and streams.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Restoration

Through CBF's restoration work, we aim to improve the capacity of rivers, streams and the Bay to treat pollution by protecting and restoring the Bay's natural filters through hands-on projects: building shoreline buffers, planting trees and shrubs, and raising oysters.

Category

Environment

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

None

Budget

Program 2

Environmental Education

CBF's award-winning environmental educators lead more than 35,000 students, teachers, and principals on hands-on field experiences and work with partners to develop systemic environmental literacy programs.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Adults

None

Budget

Program 3

Litigation

CBF's Litigation Department uses carefully chosen legal action as another tool for advancing the restoration and protection of the Chesapeake Bay, its rivers, lakes, and streams. Litigation is used to not only protect and enforce the current environmental laws but to bring about environmentally friendly change within our legal system. CBF attorneys argue cases in the federal and state courts within the watershed and file amicus curiae — also called Friend of the Court — briefs in related environmental lawsuits.

Carefully executed litigation serves three primary purposes:
•It spurs enforcement efforts against those who violate laws that were created to protect the watershed.

•It helps define and drive the agenda for public debate over restoration and protection of the Bay.

•It delivers concrete and enforceable progress in resource restoration.

Category

Environment

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

None

Budget

Program 4

Advocacy and Educating the Public

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation and its members, more than 200,000 strong, are the strongest and most effective voice that exists for protecting and restoring the Bay and its rivers and streams. We work at local, state, and federal levels for effective laws and regulations that will reduce pollution, restore vital natural systems like oyster reefs, forests, and wetlands, and encourage smart growth in our communities.

Category

Environment

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

None

Budget

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. We define a Saved Bay as having a score of 70 (out of 100) on CBF's State of the Bay health index.

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
At 70, the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers will be highly productive and in good health. The results will be clear water and healthy oxygen levels, supporting living resources. cbf.org/stateofthebay

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Goal:
    Federal, state, and local governments will fully enforce the Clean Water Act and all other clean water laws and regulations. The Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint, the precedent-setting program for pollution reduction, will be defended from powerful opposition forces trying to derail it and will be
    on track to meet its 2025 deadline. When fully implemented, the Blueprint will result in the “delisting" of the Bay. This will achieve the equivalent of a 40 on CBF's Health Index, due to the resulting reduction of nitrogen loads to 186 million pounds per year and phosphorus loads to 12.5 million pounds per year.

    Outcomes:
    1. There is broad recognition among the public, media, elected and appointed officials and others that the Bay is a national treasure and that saving the Bay is a national priority;
    2. All states and the District of Columbia are on track to meet 2025 Blueprint goals;
    3. Virginia and Maryland are halfway to achieving and maintaining their goal of 10 billion additional adult oysters by 2025;
    4. There is broad recognition that Blueprint pollution limits are a cap and that new loads mustbe offset; and
    5. CBF's board, staff, and supporting constituency are diverse, reflecting the demographic profile of the region, and our programs reflect the interests of a diverse constituency.

  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Strategies:
    While CBF will continue to defend and implement the Blueprint across the watershed, a special emphasis will be focused on Pennsylvania. Pollution flowing down the Susquehanna is overwhelming progress made thus far by Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Unless Pennsylvania dramatically increases its pollution reduction efforts, the Bay will continue to be polluted. CBF will rebrand its operations to reflect the benefit of clean water in Pennsylvania, accelerate all of its operations in the state, and seek broad partnerships with sporting interests focused on fresh water fisheries.

    Throughout the entire watershed, CBF will:
    • Educate strategic and diverse stakeholders, opinion leaders, elected and appointed officials, school administrators, teachers, and students about the imperative of clean water. Education will serve as a means to student and citizen engagement and behavior change.
    • Advocate for the defense and implementation of the Blueprint. Drawing on the beneficial results of CBF educational efforts, we will engage adults and young people in efforts to ensure that good laws and regulations are developed, introduced, passed, retained,and enforced.
    • Litigate to ensure Blueprint implementation, and to expose and rectify the most egregious cases of non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations. CBF will intervene in litigation brought by Blueprint opponents to derail it.
    • Restore natural filters in order to demonstrate the feasibility of Blueprint implementation to achieve demonstrable, specific, on-the-ground water-quality improvements. Restoration work on private land will strive to have every landowner actively advocate for Blueprint implementation.
    • Diversify our staff, and board, as a means to connect with and engage the diverse coalition of stakeholders necessary to save the Bay. Consistent with our mission, CBF will seek to work on issues which reflect the interests of diverse constituencies.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    CBF has a staff of approximately 260 full and part-time employees working in offices in Annapolis and Easton, Maryland; Richmond and Norfolk, Virginia; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; and Washington, D.C. These staff are experts in education, advocacy, litigation, and restoration and many have been acknowledged as such—receiving awards and honors recognizing their prominence in their respective fields. We have 15 field education program locations and a fleet of vehicles and vessels that we use for restoration and education, including skiffs, 40-ft workboats, and custom-designed oyster restoration vessels, such as the most technologically advanced oyster restoration vessel on the Bay, the R/V Patricia Campbell. CBF has an annual budget of approximately $25 million. Our work is supported by more than 200,000 members and e-subscribers, including more than 28,000 volunteers who donate more than 56,000 hours of their time every year.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    The health of the Chesapeake relies on intricate natural systems that filter water and provide habitat for diverse and abundant life. The State of the Bay report is a comprehensive measure of the Bay's health. CBF scientists measure its health by examining the best available historical and current information for 13 indicators in three categories: pollution, habitat, and fisheries. CBF scientists then assign each indicator an index score between 1 and 100. Taken together, these indicators offer an assessment of the Chesapeake's health. CBF issued its first State of the Bay report in 1998.

    The 2014 report is available on our website at: cbf.org/stateofthebay. Progress is compared against the last State of the Bay report, published by CBF in 2012. The 2016 report will be available in January 2017.

    Indicators specific to our Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint work:
    CBF closely monitors the two-year milestones committed to by states as part of the Blueprint. CBF releases a milestone report every two years and makes it available on our website at cbf.org/milestones.

    In addition, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation Board of Trustees is responsible for assessing the organization's effectiveness at least every two years. The evaluation may include internal effectiveness and external results.

    Measuring effectiveness is to take into account performance in reaching strategic goals and objectives in the following organizational areas:

    1. Program impact and outcomes.
    2. Visibility (including the ability to get the word out and attract donors and constituents).

    3. Financial stability.
    4. Staff qualifications, tenure and turnover.

    The Board will recommend specific actions that may need to be taken by either the Board and/or staff to reach its established strategic goals and objectives.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    2016 Accomplishments -

    Scientists have documented remarkable improvements to the Chesapeake Bay's health over the past year: Bay-wide, the abundance of underwater grasses increased by 21 percent, to the highest levels ever recorded in the annual survey. The blue crab population increased by 35 percent. The Bay's native oyster population is also beginning to rebound. Last year, harvests reached a thirty-year high.

    Although we still have a long way to go, we've made incredible progress this year. A selection of our most notable achievements during 2016 include:

    • Educated 41,032 students, teachers, and adults through our award-winning environmental education program—an increase of 17 percent over last year!
    • Established the legality of the Bay clean-up plan, the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint, in federal court, concluding five years of litigation.
    • Planted more than 46 million juvenile oysters on protected sanctuary reefs—the most we have ever planted in a single year!
    • Reduced agricultural pollution by working with 386 farmers and landowners to install conservation practices.
    • Raised public awareness through our print and online communications, and by appearing in the media an average of 4.5 times per day. We also grew our Facebook presence to an average daily following of 69,798 people, an increase of 62 percent over last year.
    • Provided 29,759 pounds of organic produce to 200 low-income families in the Washington, D.C., region through a partnership between the Capital Area Food Bank and CBF's Clagett Farm.
    • Engaged decision-makers and community leaders in our work, including Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe, who visited the Brock Environmental Center in Virginia Beach, and Pennsylvania's State Senator Richard Alloway II, who planted trees with CBF.
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

We serve the Chesapeake Bay watershed which covers 64,000 square miles across six states (Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New York, West Virginia) and the District of Columbia.

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

As a member-supported not-for-profit organization, CBF relies on the financial support of individuals, corporations, foundations, and grant-making agencies to fund our activities.

Accreditations

Videos

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

CHESAPEAKE BAY FOUNDATION INC
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
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President

Mr. William C. Baker

BIO

William C. Baker, Baltimore, MD – has been the President of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation since 1982. Mr. Baker serves on the boards of Brown Advisory & Trust Company, Central Maryland Transportation Alliance, Clayton Fund, Garden Club of America, Institute for the Venice Lagoon, Hopkins, Open Society Institute – Baltimore, and the University of Maryland Baltimore County.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Harry T. Lester

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members.

Diversity Strategies
No
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity