Science and Technology Research Institutes

Carnegie Institution of Washington

  • Washington, DC
  • www.carnegiescience.edu

Mission Statement

The Institution's purpose, as conceived by Andrew Carnegie, is to "encourage, in the broadest and most liberal manner, investigation, research, and discovery, and the application of knowledge to the improvement of mankind." The Carnegie Institution is devoted to addressing fundamental questions on the frontiers of biology, earth sciences, and astronomy that its trustees and scientists consider to be among the most significant in science. Its funds are used to support projects at its own research departments and to conduct a program of advanced education at the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels. It also offers programs for elementary school teachers and children in Washington, DC., Baltimore, MD and Pasadena, CA.

Main Programs

  1. Interdisciplinary scientific research
  2. BioEYES in Baltimore
  3. Department of Global Ecology: Carnegie Airborne Observatory
  4. Deep Carbon Observatory
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

Our scientific research laboratories are located in Pasadena, CA, Palo Alto, CA, Baltimore, MD, and Washington, D.C.  We also operate a major astronomical observatory in Chile.

ruling year

1914

President since 2014

Self-reported

Dr. Matthew P. Scott

Keywords

Self-reported

science, science education, research, astronomy, molecular biology, planetary science, earth science, global ecology, plant biology, high pressure physics and chemistry, astrobiology

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EIN

53-0196523

 Number

5341074033

Also Known As

Carnegie Institution for Science

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Science, General (includes Interdisciplinary Scientific Activities) (U20)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (C05)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (B05)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Carnegie's small size belies its long reach. Fewer than 80 senior scientists populate our six research laboratories. But in one recent year, our scientsts published over 550 scientific papers. The discoveries run the gamut from molecular biology to the large-scale structure of the universe. These impressive accomplishments could not happen without partnerships with outside organizations and scientists, liaisons with government agencies, relationships with our postdocs, and much more. It is through these connections that Carnegie enhances its impact.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Interdisciplinary scientific research

The Carnegie Institution's operating programs consist of scientific research conducted at its six departments:

 

The Department of Embryology, located in Baltimore, MD, studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying differentiation, growth, and morphogeneis, and the way these processes are coordinated.

 

The Department of Plant Biology, located in Stanford, CA, conducts research on physiological, biochemical, and genetic mechanisms underlying plant evolution and adaptation to different environments.

 

The Department of Global Ecology, located in Stanford, CA, studies the complex ineractions between the Earth's ecosystems.

 

The Geophysical Laboratory, located in Washington, DC, conducts interdisciplinary studies of geophysical and biogeochemical topics, with an emphasis on conditions found at the Earth's crust, mantle, and core.

 

The Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, located in Washington, DC, concentrates on a wide range of topics in astrophysics, seismology, geochemistry and planetary physics.

 

The Carnegie Observatories, headquartered in Pasadena, CA, investigates the age and structure of the universe, the evolution of stars, galaxies, and black holes, and the structure of planetary systems around other stars.   An extensive program of observational astronomy is conducted at Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory in Chile.

 

The Carnegie Academy for Science Education, located in Washington, DC, offers programs designed to improve science, mathematics and technology education in the District of Columbia's public and charter schools.

Category

Science & Technology

Population(s) Served

Other Named Groups

Budget

$83,069,641.00

Program 2

BioEYES in Baltimore

BioEYES is a K-12 science outreach education program in Baltimore, Philadelphia and other locations that provides outdoor and in-class, hands-on learning opportunities through the use of live zebrafish. BioEYES engages students in an experiment based on biology curriculum standards in cell biology and animal development, and explores scientific careers. It also offers an environmental unit called Your Watershed Your Backyard that teaches students about watershed ecology. Lastly, it offers professional development and support to teachers, who within three years may be designated "Master Teachers" and take responsibility for teaching the unit independently with materials from BioEYES.  Carnegie's Department of Embryology, located on the campus of Johns Hopkins University, hosts BioEYES in Baltimore.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$155,000.00

Program 3

Department of Global Ecology: Carnegie Airborne Observatory

Carnegie Airborne Observatory:  In 2008, the Department of Global Ecology launched a powerful new environmental remote monitoring program in Hawaii, South Africa and Peru that combined extensive field work and aerial remote sensing technologies.  There are ambitious plans to expand the program to other tropical and subtropical regions around the globe in 2011.  The international team of scientists carrying out the forest monitoring program under the leadership of Dr. Gregory Asner analyzes biochemical and structural information about forest canopies using a sophisticated instrument that combines LiDAR and hyperspectral imaging. Early studies are leading to deeper understanding of changing patterns of biodiversity and to improved management of imperiled ecosystems.  This remote sensing and field research program is poised to make a major contribution to the United Nations' REDD (Reduction in Emissions from Deforestation and Rainforest Destruction) initiative.

Category

Environment

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

Program 4

Deep Carbon Observatory

Carbon plays an unparalleled role in our lives: as the element of life, as the basis of most of society’s energy, as the backbone of most new materials, and as the central focus in efforts to understand Earth’s variable and uncertain climate. Yet in spite of carbon’s importance, scientists remain largely ignorant of the physical, chemical, and biological behavior of many of Earth’s carbon-bearing systems. The Deep Carbon Observatory is a global research program to transform our understanding of carbon in Earth. At its heart, DCO is a community of scientists, from biologists to physicists, geoscientists to chemists, and many others whose work crosses these disciplinary lines, forging a new, integrative field of deep carbon science. To complement this groundbreaking research, the DCO’s infrastructure includes public engagement and education, online and offline community support, innovative data management, and novel instrumentation.

Category

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

Service Areas

Self-reported

International

Our scientific research laboratories are located in Pasadena, CA, Palo Alto, CA, Baltimore, MD, and Washington, D.C.  We also operate a major astronomical observatory in Chile.

Funding Needs

Funds are needed to enhance and expand a wide range of dynamic and cutting-edge research projects organized by the institution's astronomers, geophysicists, geochemists, planetary scientists, developmental biologists, plant biologists, and environmental scientists.  Funds are needed to support the development and fabrication of scientific instrumentation, to provide postdoctoral fellowships to promising young scientists, to improve scientific infrastructure, and to support research expeditions in the field.

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Carnegie Institution of Washington

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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President

Dr. Matthew P. Scott

BIO

Dr. Matthew P. Scott was appointed the tenth president of the Carnegie Institution for Science beginning September 1, 2014. Scott was Professor of Developmental Biology, Genetics, Bioengineering, and Biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine prior to his Carnegie appointment.

Scott did his undergraduate and graduate work at M.I.T., with Prof. Mary Lou Pardue as his Ph.D. thesis advisor. He moved to Indiana University for his postdoctoral work as a Helen Hay Whitney fellow with Profs. Thomas Kaufman and Barry Polisky. After setting up his own lab at the University of Colorado, Boulder, Dr. Scott went to Stanford in 1990 to join the newly formed Department of Developmental Biology, and the Department of Genetics. His research focused on genes that control development, and how damage to these genes leads to birth defects, cancer, and neurodegeneration. He discovered the “homeobox,”an evolutionarily conserved component of many genes that control development. His lab group discovered the genetic basis of the most common human cancer, basal cell carcinoma, and of the most common childhood malignant brain tumor, medulloblastoma.

Scott served as Associate Chair and Chair of the Department of Developmental Biology for a total of six years. He chaired the multidisciplinary Bio-X program at Stanford from 2001-2007 and was Co-chair of the Center for Children’s Brain Tumors. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Institute of Medicine, and he served as president of the Society for Developmental Biology. His awards include the Passano Award (1990), the Conklin Medal of the Society for Developmental Biology (2004), and the Pasarow Award in Cancer Research (2013).


Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Suzanne Nora E. Johnson

Goldman Sachs, retired

Term: May 2013 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?