Arts, Culture, and Humanities

National Trust for Historic Preservation in the US

  • Washington, DC
  • https://savingplaces.org

Mission Statement

The National Trust for Historic Preservation protects significant places representing our diverse cultural experience by taking direct action and inspiring broad public support.

Main Programs

  1. America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list
  2. Preservation Green Lab
  3. America's National Treasures
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

The National Trust for Historic Preservation serves communities throughout the United States, through: its national headquarters in Washington, D.C. and 12 regional offices across the country. Partner organizations at the statewide or local level in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; and through 27 National Trust Historic Sites.

ruling year

1950

Principal Officer

Self-reported

Mrs. Stephanie Meeks

Keywords

Self-reported

Historic Preservation, Architecture, Historic Districts, Revitalization, Culture

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EIN

53-0210807

 Number

7261051446

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Historical Societies and Related Activities (A80)

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list

America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places has identified more than 250 threatened one-of-a-kind historic treasures since 1988. Whether these sites are urban districts or rural landscapes, Native American landmarks or 20th-century sports arenas, entire communities or single buildings, the list spotlights historic places across America that are threatened by neglect, insufficient funds, inappropriate development or insensitive public policy. The designation has been a powerful tool for raising awareness and rallying resources to save endangered sites from every region of the country. At times, that attention has garnered public support to quickly rescue a treasured landmark; while in other instances, it has been the impetus of a long battle to save an important piece of our history.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Budget

Program 2

Preservation Green Lab

The National Trust’s Preservation Green Lab advances research that explores the value that older buildings bring to their communities, and pioneers policy solutions that make it easier to reuse and green older and historic buildings. The Green Lab works to minimize carbon impacts from buildings through direct emissions reductions from building retrofits and reuse, and to preserve communities’ older, smaller buildings.

Category

Environment

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

Program 3

America's National Treasures

National Treasures are a portfolio of highly-significant historic places throughout the country where the National Trust makes a long-term commitment to find a preservation solution. As the presenting partner of the National Treasures program, American Express has pledged $2 million to help promote and enable the preservation of these cultural and historic places. For more information, visit www.savingplaces.org.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's diverse historic places and revitalize our communities by providing leadership, education, advocacy and resources.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Our strategies include:

    -Taking direct action through our National Treasures program to protect a diverse portfolio of America's most important threatened historic places while advancing cutting-edge preservation tools.
    -Building tomorrow's preservation movement, which will inspire and activate a larger, broader and more diverse movement.
    -Supporting today's preservation community by advocating, informing and training around national priorities which advance shared goals and strengthen the preservation community.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    With more than 60 years of experience, the National Trust is taking direct action to protect places and promote preservation. Our staff, located in our Washington, D.C., headquarters and in 9 field offices across the country, is comprised of preservation, advocacy, legal, marketing and fund-raising experts.

    Our work takes many forms: we take direct, on-the-ground action when historic sites are threatened; facilitate public participation in the preservation of nationally-significant sites, buildings, and objects; advocate with decision-makers to save America's heritage; and help sustain vibrant communities.

    As an organization, we strive to create a cultural legacy that is as diverse as the nation itself so that all of us can take pride in our part of the American story.

    The National Trust for Historic Preservation utilizes a variety of tools and initiatives to lead the preservation of America's historic and cultural legacies. The cornerstone of our current strategic focus is a growing portfolio of National Treasures – threatened places of national significance where our deep and long term involvement will have positive implications for preservation nationwide.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    The National Trust utilizes a work planning tool that clearly defines the organization's mission and strategies to achieve a variety of goals. The tool is used at every level of the organization helping to create benchmarks that align strategic expansion to overall progress throughout the year.

    We know we are making progress by increasing our efforts in the following areas:

    -Launching campaigns that help save historic places through comprehensive marketing and preservation efforts
    -Working to protect our diverse portfolio of America's National Treasures by growing our portfolio of Treasure sites to 100 sites over a five year span
    -Developing multiple grassroots campaigns to support our preservation priorities
    -Advancing legislative priorities around the defense of the Historic Tax Credit (HTC), Historic Preservation Fund (HPF), and diversity and cultural resource protection on public lands
    -Developing community outreach programs that will educate, train and inspire people across the country to support preservation efforts
    -Providing key legal support of National Treasures and other preservation efforts
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    The National Trust for Historic Preservation has accomplished the following:

    -Launched more than 60 National Treasure campaigns and completed 13. Tackled some of the toughest preservation challenges and won the vast majority of the time.
    -Created a National Treasure portfolio that begins to reflect the diversity of America. More than 40 percent of our National Treasures reflect the history of women and people of color.
    -Pioneered creative new approaches to site stewardship at our portfolio of 27 National Trust historic sites. Shared these new models nationally, to help the country's 15,000 house museums, many of which are struggling financially.
    -Trained dozens of young people in the preservation building trades through HOPE Crew program. HOPE Crews have completed millions of dollars in rehab work at more than 60 sites.
    -Hosted the preeminent annual gathering of preservationists, drawing more than 600 thought leaders in person and hundreds more virtually.
    -Convened leaders of top national organizations representing diverse constituencies for the 2015 PastForward Diversity Summit, “Telling America's Full History: A Conversation on Diversity in Preservation."
    -Encouraged rehab and reuse by providing civic leaders in five cities with customized data on how to maximize the use of their historic building stock.
    -Provided expert consultation that retained, reinstated or improved state historic tax credits in Wisconsin, Texas, North Carolina, Kansas, Missouri and Georgia.
    -Advocated successfully to create and continue congressional funding for a competitive grant program that helps state historic preservation offices to include more under-represented communities in their statewide inventories, and on the National Register and National Historic Landmark lists.

    The National Trust for Historic Preservation has not yet accomplished the following:

    -Passage of the Prosperity through Preservation/CAPP Act (H.R.2479/S.2074) – these efforts are ongoing
    -We continue working to broaden the scope of our projects and campaigns, to continue building toward a cultural heritage that fully reflects the diversity of America.
    -We continue exploring new and creative approaches to historic site stewardship. We continue working to educate and inform civic leaders at all levels about the economic and environmental value of building rehab and reuse.

Service Areas

Self-reported

National

The National Trust for Historic Preservation serves communities throughout the United States, through: its national headquarters in Washington, D.C. and 12 regional offices across the country. Partner organizations at the statewide or local level in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; and through 27 National Trust Historic Sites.

Social Media

Blog

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

NATIONAL TRUST FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION IN THE UNITED STATES
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

National Trust for Historic Preservation in the US

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Mrs. Stephanie Meeks

BIO

Stephanie Meeks has been the president and chief executive officer of the National Trust for Historic Preservation since July 2010. Under her leadership, the National Trust has developed an ambitious strategic plan designed to refocus direct action on saving imperiled places, engage new audiences in preservation, and increase the organization's impact by a factor of ten.

Under Stephanie's tenure, the National Trust has worked to bring a more diverse and younger group of Americans into the preservation movement, and support their efforts in their communities and across the nation. It has also launched an effort to highlight the critical connection between older buildings and vibrant cities, and spearheaded research reflecting the benefits of historic preservation in today's urban areas.

Stephanie has championed 21st-century business processes and systems to better meet today's preservation challenges. The organization has strategically repositioned its portfolio of 27 historic sites to achieve new levels of stewardship, implemented a bold plan to upgrade its technology infrastructure, and moved its operations to the historic Watergate building, creating a dynamic, state-of-the-art workplace to move preservation forward.

Before joining the National Trust, Stephanie served in several senior executive positions with The Nature Conservancy, one of the world's largest and most influential conservation organizations. She also served as director of RARE, a U.S.-based conservation group that uses social marketing to address environmental challenges in communities around the world, and currently serves as Chair of the Board of the Potomac Conservancy. She holds a B.A. in English from the University of Colorado and an MBA from George Washington University.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Marita Rivero

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Race & Ethnicity
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
Yes
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
Yes
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
Yes
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
Yes
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
Yes
We have a diversity committee in place
Yes
We have a diversity manager in place
Yes
We have a diversity plan
Yes
We use other methods to support diversity