Health—General & Rehabilitative

Chattering Children

  • McLean, VA
  • www.chatteringchildren.org

Mission Statement

Chattering Children – More than just talk.

Equipping children with hearing loss and their families with
a foundation for lifelong learning through listening and spoken language.  Building productive partnerships in
research, professional training, and collaborative outreach programs to promote
best practices in language learning for children with hearing loss.

Main Programs

  1. Program 1
  2. AV Therapy Financial Assistance
  3. Language and Literacy Theater Based Workshop
  4. AV Tele-Therapy Capital Acquisition
  5. Educational Tutoring Services
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

We serve the Greater Washington Metropolitan area, the states of Virginia and Pennsylvania, and Baltimore, Maryland through work in our Auditory Verbal Therapy center and home visits contracted by state and county early intervention programs.  We offer tele-therapy, training, and mentoring nationally and internationally.

ruling year

1999

Principal Officer since 2008

Self-reported

Anne Davis

Keywords

Self-reported

hearing loss, hearing impairment, deaf, auditory-verbal, auditory-oral, listening, spoken language, parent training, aural habilitation, mainstream support, early intervention, parent infant program, language and literacy theater workshop, tutoring, cochlear implant

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EIN

54-1924115

 Number

0802929875

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Rehabilitative Medical Services (E50)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The core of our practice at Chattering Children has always
been Auditory-Verbal therapy, a research-based, family-centered, deliberate
approach to develop the listening and language skills of children with hearing
loss.  Principles of this approach
include use of state-of-the-art hearing technology, ongoing assessment, and
actively coaching families to become the primary facilitators of spoken
language for their child.  The goal
of Auditory Verbal therapy is to maximize children’s potential in listening and
spoken language, and to transition them into regular education settings.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

We have two facilities -- Richmond Center (in Glen Allen) and NoVA Center just outside Washington DC. At the Richmond Center, we have an auditory-verbal therapy program in which infants and children receive individual therapy and their parents receive training by participating in the therapy sessions. In addition, we have a school called SPEAK UP in the Richmond Center that provides a specially tailored educational environment to help prepare children with hearing loss for a mainstream education. In our NoVA Center, we have an auditory-verbal therapy program and also program intensive listening and language groups. We are a specialized non-profit and only serve children with a hearing loss. Many of our children use a cochlear implant and some use hearing aids. Our therapy and school focus on developing the child's ability to use their listening to learn spoken language and learn to speak. We currently serve about 20 families in our richmond facility and 27 families in our NoVA facility.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Program 2

AV Therapy Financial Assistance

Chattering Children is a non-profit and we turn no child away regardless of their families' ability to pay for services.  Counties and insurers are not always able to provide the level of support necessary to allow children with hearing loss to meet their full potential.  Many of our families receive financial assistance to cover the costs not covered by insurance or meet needs that their county's or state's budget does not allow.  The financial assistance fund allows us to meet our mission and pay our bills.

Category

Health Care

Population(s) Served

Deaf and Hearing Impaired

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$20,000.00

Program 3

Language and Literacy Theater Based Workshop

Hearing loss has a significant impact not only on a child’s
language development, but also the development of literacy skills.  Hearing students bring a variety of
skills to the reading task that are often lacking in their peers with hearing
loss.  A solid vocabulary allows a
child to apply meaning to the words he encounters. Understanding of the
structure, or syntax, of language is important in drawing meaning from print.
Awareness of phonology, or the sounds of speech, helps a student combine and
manipulate letters and sounds into words.  Children with hearing loss frequently have more restricted
vocabularies, weaker and less flexible language structure, and poorer
phonological awareness.  Additionally
the background knowledge that most hearing students acquire incidentally, and
the inferences that they make intuitively, are not readily apparent to most
young readers who have a significant hearing loss.  Auditory memory that develops naturally in most hearing
children is often weak in children with hearing loss, impacting their ability
to understand sequences and aspects of narratives in storytelling.   Similarly the writing skills of children with hearing loss
are often immature or of poorer quality than their hearing peers.

While early identification and intervention have improved
outcomes for children with hearing loss in many areas including language and
literacy, they continue to lag behind their hearing peers.   Additionally issues of hearing loss are often complicated by
other factors impacting education access.  Current statistics indicate that more than one third of
children in school programs with hearing loss have an additional disability,
such as a learning disability.  One
fourth of students with hearing loss are from non-English speaking families.  These students are at even greater risk
for poor literacy skills.

Older elementary students with hearing loss are also
encountering social obstacles, grappling with more challenging curriculum, and
developing extracurricular interests.  A therapy setting often becomes less appealing and less
motivating.  Additionally the funds
available to families through insurance for habilitation of listening and
language are not available for literacy support as children get older, making
services less accessible.  
The Theater Workshop is a context for both effectively engaging students
and building reading and writing skills.

Theatre workshops provide a medium to promote and enhance
literacy by engaging students in all aspects of theatrical production, from
development of the script to the final production.

·     
To
improve a broad range of skills for participants that contribute to reading
fluency and comprehension

·     
To
target weakness of individual readers using a standardized measure, and
integrate intervention strategies within the context of the drama group

·     
To
provide an engaging, age-appropriate context to build expressive language
skills and social competence

·     
To
expose students and involve families to elements of literature, history, arts,
and music through drama production

The culmination of each workshop is a ticketed production at
a local venue.  Students are responsible
for creating sets, assembling costumes, performing, managing the stage, and
advertising.  Not only would the
production provide a centerpiece for the students, it would also provide a
venue for the community to enjoy the students’ accomplishments and to learn
more about the challenges of students with hearing loss.

Category

Health Care

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Deaf and Hearing Impaired

Budget

$25,000.00

Program 4

AV Tele-Therapy Capital Acquisition

Chattering Children is currently piloting tele-therapy to
remote regions which do not offer therapy, training, and mentoring services for
children with hearing loss, their families, and their teachers and SLPs.  There are many regions which do not have access to skilled listening and spoken language specialists.  Children with hearing loss in these regions may have received cochlear implants, but are not able to learn how to utilize and benefit from the devices.  Through the provision of tele-therapy, we can offer not only therapy to the child, but coaching and training for their family, educators, speech language pathologists, and audiologists.  Many families do not have access to the technology required to receive tele-therapy.  This fund would allow us to purchase necessary equipment to loan to these families while they are receiving tele-therapy.

 

We have also begun to offer tele-therapy to adults who have been recently cochlear implanted that are not able to work regular center visits into their schedules.  This rehabilitation is critical to the optimal use of their cochlear implants.

Category

Health Care

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Deaf and Hearing Impaired

Adults

Budget

$5,000.00

Program 5

Educational Tutoring Services

Children with cochlear implants work hard to translate the signals sent by their hearing devices to their brains into speech and language.  These children who also struggle with learning differences experience exponential difficulties with school and homework.  Our highly trained and specialized professionals are uniquely qualified to teach and pre-teach these children so they may reach their fullest academic potential.  This project includes the funding of specialized training for our professionals and significant financial support for the tutoring services, as insurance does not provide coverage for this type of support.  Additionally, children (and their parents) participating in this program will understand their learning strengths and weaknesses to empower them to take charge of their own learning and advocate for themselves.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Deaf and Hearing Impaired

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Budget

$20,000.00

Service Areas

Self-reported

International

We serve the Greater Washington Metropolitan area, the states of Virginia and Pennsylvania, and Baltimore, Maryland through work in our Auditory Verbal Therapy center and home visits contracted by state and county early intervention programs.  We offer tele-therapy, training, and mentoring nationally and internationally.

Funding Needs

Chattering Children's top funding need is to provide financial assistance to families requiring support to pay for Auditory Verbal Therapy.  We also provide a host of community service and outreach projects at no cost to children with hearing loss and their families, these projects include: language and literacy theater based workshops, parent-infant play groups, music play groups, parent and professional education, and educational tutoring services.  These programs are offered at no cost to reach everyone, particularly under-served populations.  In order to continue these programs, funding support is necessary.  We are also seeking funding to support our new tele-therapy efforts and several research projects.

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Financials

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Chattering Children
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Chattering Children

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

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  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Anne Davis

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Steve Wells Esquire

McDermott Will & Emery

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


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BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?