Philanthropy, Voluntarism, and Grantmaking

Hampton Roads Community Foundation

  • Norfolk, VA
  • www.hamptonroadscf.org

Mission Statement

The mission of Hampton Roads Community Foundation is to make gifts that transform the quality of life and inspire philanthropy in southeastern Virginia. It is our vision to be the premier provider of philanthropic services in southeastern Virginia offering: charitable gift planning and grantmaking consultation to donors, financial and technical resources to non-profit organizations, and leadership in problem solving to the communities we serve.

Main Programs

  1. Community Grants
  2. Scholarships
  3. Special Interest Grants
Service Areas

Self-reported

Virginia

The Foundation concentrates its resources geographically to provide the most benefit to area residents. Typically, community grants are only awarded to nonprofit organizations that serve residents of South Hampton Roads (i.e. the cities of Norfolk, Portsmouth, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, Suffolk and Isle of Wight County) and the Eastern Shore.

ruling year

2001

Principal Officer

Self-reported

Dr. Deborah M. DiCroce

Keywords

Self-reported

NORFOLK FOUNDATION, philanthropy, grantmaking

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EIN

54-2035996

 Number

1927119064

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Community Foundations (T31)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

Scholarships, Student Financial Aid, Awards (B82)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The Hampton Roads Community Foundation is a permanent endowment focused on improving life in southeastern Virginia today and forever. Since our founding in 1950 we have focused on being an excellent steward of the charitable assets entrusted to us by residents from all walks of life. Through the power of endowment, donors' gifts have helped put more than $230 million to work over the decades by funding nonprofit grants, providing college scholarships and underpinning initiatives that tackle major issues.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Community Grants

Community Grants are awarded in two major categories -- for Nonprofit Facilities Improvement for capital campaigns and major improvements, and for Seed and Program Funding in arts and culture, education, environment and health and human services.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

None

None

Budget

$5,000,000.00

Program 2

Scholarships

The Foundation administers more than 60 scholarship funds that are helping local students attend college.

Category

Student Financial Aid

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Young Adults (20-25 years) -- currently not in use

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

$1,000,000.00

Program 3

Special Interest Grants

Funding is available in specific areas selected by donors who have field-of-interest or donor-advised funds at the community foundation. Special interest grants are available in the following interest areas: abused adults or children, youth baseball and softball
horticulture education, pianos, mental health research, Virginia Peninsula high schools and arts and culture, people with Cerebral Palsy or developmental delays, Faith Community Nursing programs, and Focus areas selected annually by our Community Leadership Partners giving group.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    We work to make southeastern Virginia a vibrant region where all citizens have opportunities to thrive in life, which includes being healthy, living in a stable environment, having access to quality education and job training, having well-paying jobs available, having an abundance of cultural offerings and being part of a community that values the preservation and restoration of its environment. We also want to encourage citizens to connect through their community in various ways, including as donors to worthy causes with the community foundation as a conduit for their philanthropy. We also want to provide leadership on critical issues and serve as a convener, catalyst and funder.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    We take a strategic approach to providing grants to nonprofit organizations and scholarships to college students using funds entrusted to us by donors. We invest charitable donations to provide funds for distribution not and to grow over time so that most funds are perpetual. We work to connect with community-minded citizens to help them find appropriate ways to be philanthropists--either through current gifts or future gifts through bequests. We also incubate community leadership initiatives and bring together a cross-section of community leaders to help launch them with the intention of spinning off initiatives once they have had a chance to develop and succeed.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    We have a growing endowment of more than $300 million, committed donors, a strong board and a staff with a variety of expertise from grantmaking and donor relations to development, marketing and accounting. We also have established partnerships with numerous nonprofits and other organizations working to benefit southeastern Virginia. Our strong track record of improving our community dates to out founding in 1950.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    We know we are making progress when nonprofit grant recipients hit their outcomes targets that are required for receiving grants and when our college scholarship recipients graduate and move on to productive lives.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    We have helped make our region a vibrant cultural hub that exceeds those of many communities our size. We have helped our region reduce its homeless population by supporting programs and the building of single-room occupancy apartments that include supportive services, and we have helped hundreds of nonprofit organizations do their best work. We have also helped more than 4,100 students get college educations. What we have not accomplished so far is leveling the playing field for all citizens in our region so they are educated, healthy and self-sufficient.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Virginia

The Foundation concentrates its resources geographically to provide the most benefit to area residents. Typically, community grants are only awarded to nonprofit organizations that serve residents of South Hampton Roads (i.e. the cities of Norfolk, Portsmouth, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, Suffolk and Isle of Wight County) and the Eastern Shore.

Social Media

Funding Needs

You can create a permanent, named gift fund with a minimum contribution of $25,000. You can donate any amount to an existing fund or to our Community Funds, which provide grants to many nonprofits or let you support specific causes, such as arts and culture; civic leadership; educational achievement; environment; health and human services, and scholarships.

Accreditations

Council on Foundations National Standards

Affiliations + Memberships

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member

Council on Foundations - Member

Southeastern Council of Foundations

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

HAMPTON ROADS COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Hampton Roads Community Foundation

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Dr. Deborah M. DiCroce

BIO

Deborah M. DiCroce is president and CEO of the Hampton Roads Community Foundation. Before joining the staff in 2012, she was president of Tidewater Community College for 14 years. Previously she was president of Piedmont Community College in Charlottesville for nine years.

She was appointed in November 2013 to the board of visitors of Norfolk State University. She serves as secretary of the Hampton Roads Community Foundation board of directors. She serves on the boards of the Future of Hampton Roads, Greater Norfolk Corporation, Virginia Beach Vision and the Town Point Club. She serves on the United Way Children's Zone Steering Committee and Norfolk State University's Business and Economic Development Advisory Council. In 2012 the Chesapeake Rotary Club named her First Citizen of Chesapeake.

She previously chaired the Hampton Roads Partnership board, Urban League of Hampton Roads board and the regional board of the Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce. She is a former member of the Christopher Newport University board of visitors, Sentara Healthcare, Portsmouth Partnership and the Smart Beginnings South Hampton Roads boards of directors. She also served on Governor Bob McDonnell’s Commission on Economic Development & Job Creation. She earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Old Dominion University and a doctorate in education from The College of William & Mary.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

John O. "Dubby" Wynne

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
No
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan