Arts, Culture, and Humanities

West Virginia Humanities Council, Inc.

  • Charleston, WV
  • www.wvhumanities.org

Mission Statement

The mission of the West Virginia Humanities Council is to promote a vigorous program in the humanities statewide in West Virginia.

Main Programs

  1. The West Virginia Humanities Council
  2. e-WV: the West Virginia Encyclopedia
  3. History Alive!
  4. 1836 MacFarland-Hubbard House
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

The West Virginia Humanities Council promotes a vigorous program in the humanities statewide in West Virginia through our direct programs and grants. Internationally, we serve an audience as broad as the worldwide community of Internet users. Since launch in September 2010, we've had visits from every state in the US and 199 other countries. The top five are the US, Canada, UK, India and Australia. But, we've also been visited by Macedonia, Armenia, Zimbabwe and Kyrgyzstan.

ruling year

1976

Executive Director since 1997

Self-reported

Dr. C. Kenneth Sullivan

Keywords

Self-reported

humanities, history, literature, education, grants, West Virginia, culture

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2014, 2014 and 2013.
Register now

Also Known As

WVHC

EIN

55-0553594

 Number

4179445366

Physical Address

1310 Kanawha Blvd E

Charleston, 25301

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Humanities Organizations (A70)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The West Virginia Humanities Council is a private, nonprofit organization providing lifelong learning opportunities to the state's citizens. WVHC serves as a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The "humanities" lead us to a deeper understanding of the human experience. They explore the story of our time and culture and that of others. Each year, citizens of all ages explore their own and the larger human story through programs which use history, literature, comparative religion, philosophy, ethics, and more. Our programs are meant to get people thinking and talking with each other. The goal of the West Virginia Humanities Council is that all West Virginians experience the humanities, coming to understand and appreciate their value and relevance to our daily lives. To achieve this end, the Council is committed to: 1. Creating communities of scholars and citizens in which the meaning of the humanities is explored; 2. serving all West Virginians, particularly those not traditionally served by the state's cultural and educational institutions; 3. achieving broad citizen participation in humanities experiences; 4. fostering the humanities community by supporting and linking scholars and organizations engaged in humanities education; and 5. advocating for the humanities through raising the awareness of the general public and policymakers, and by emphasizing the importance of the humanities in local, state and national life.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

The West Virginia Humanities Council

The West Virginia Humanities Council provides funds in support of public, humanities-based programming. Some direct projects are designed and implemented by WVHC staff. Other funds, in the form of grants awarded by the Council, support programs conceived and implemented by other nonprofit organizations throughout West Virginia. The Council is committed to supporting projects that stimulate dialogue, encourage critical thinking, attract diverse audiences, and encourage discovery of the humanities in interesting and exciting ways.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

None

None

Budget

$1,450,000.00

Program 2

e-WV: the West Virginia Encyclopedia

e-WV: the West Virginia Encyclopedia builds from the major information resource represented by the West Virginia Encyclopedia. Its 2,200 articles serve as the knowledge base for the online resource, and provides its text content and basic scope. It is expanded by the acquisition and digitization of supplementary media, including still images, video and audio recordings, as well as existing and custom cartography, and the searchable database whose face is the e-WV website.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

None

None

Budget

$165,000.00

Program 3

History Alive!

History Alive! is a program that brings historical characters to life through portrayals by presenters who have conducted scholarly research on their character.  History Alive! presenters have conducted thorough research on the characters they portray. After studying primary sources such as autobiographies, journals, letters, and diaries, our presenters gain extensive insight into their character. Whenever possible they use their character's own words in their presentations. They develop their presentation based on scholarship and analysis of the character rather than by memorizing a script.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

None

None

Budget

$42,500.00

Program 4

1836 MacFarland-Hubbard House

The Council maintains an effort each year that builds upon the restoration of the historic property, including landscaping and upgrading public access to the 1836 MacFarland-Hubbard House.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

None

None

Budget

$25,000.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The West Virginia Humanities Council provides community-based lifelong learning opportunities to enrich the lives of all West Virginians. The Humanities Council grants program is designed to offer financial support for public humanities programming developed and implemented by nonprofit organizations throughout the state. The Council is committed to supporting projects that stimulate meaningful dialogue, attract diverse audiences, and encourage discovery of the humanities in interesting and exciting ways. In hundreds of programs made possible by the Humanities Council each year, citizens and scholars explore the heritage of our state and gain new perspectives on the human condition - past, present, and future.
    We believe that the humanities are indispensable because they engage us in the basic questions of human existence, who we are, what we value. The humanities encompass the range of human experience. Through the humanities we discover meaning that illuminates our individual lives, as well as the connections that bind people and cultures together. The work of the West Virginia Humanities Council is to broaden the humanities experience of all West Virginians.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    An important goal of the Council is that West Virginians come to understand and appreciate the value of the humanities in daily life. To achieve this, we are committed to creating communities of scholars and citizens in which the meaning of the humanities is explored; to serving all West Virginians, particularly those not traditionally served by other cultural and educational institutions; to achieving broad citizen participation; to fostering a humanities network linking scholars and organizations; and to advocating for the humanities among policymakers and the public.
    A vital part of our mission is to provide leadership to humanities groups, institutions, schools, and individuals. We have worked to establish the Council as the standard bearer for the humanities in West Virginia. We respond to a diversity of needs through technical assistance, dissemination of information, advocacy, distribution of our quarterly publication People & Mountains, grants, advisory support, and program delivery.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    The Council staff is a committed, well-established group, with average tenure of employment exceeding five years. There is occasional turnover at all levels, but top leadership has been remarkably stable. Veteran executive director Charles Daugherty left in 1996 after nearly twenty years, and Ken Sullivan, the present director, began work in 1997. Our philosophy has been to remain a streamlined operation with a small, highly professional staff.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    The West Virginia Humanities Council has stood the tests of its early decades, maturing into an organization with a statewide mission matched by the ability to deliver programs throughout the state.
    We take an organic approach to planning at the West Virginia Humanities Council. This requires a clear understanding of organizational culture, vision and values, and the general ends to be achieved, and proceeds forward on that basis. The benchmarks of conventional planning models are generally absent. Feedback is sought more or less continuously, in the form of frequent financial and program reports, to assure that satisfactory progress is being made.
    We find it best to posit goals and objectives broadly, preserving operational ability to respond to changing circumstances. We believe this maximizes a chief advantage of small nonprofits, which is their nimbleness and flexibility.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    We see our Council evolving over the next three and five years toward a bigger, better version of what it is today. We will seek overall growth and particularly to grow the portion of our resources devoted to our product, the humanities services we provide to the citizens of West Virginia.
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

The West Virginia Humanities Council promotes a vigorous program in the humanities statewide in West Virginia through our direct programs and grants. Internationally, we serve an audience as broad as the worldwide community of Internet users. Since launch in September 2010, we've had visits from every state in the US and 199 other countries. The top five are the US, Canada, UK, India and Australia. But, we've also been visited by Macedonia, Armenia, Zimbabwe and Kyrgyzstan.

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

For fiscal year 2011 we have an overall goal to raise 250,000 through donations and grant awards from foundations, corporations, organizations and individuals.

Accreditations

National Register of Historic Places - Listed Property

Affiliations + Memberships

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member

photos


External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

THE WEST VIRGINIA HUMANITIES COUNCIL INC
Fiscal year: Nov 01-Oct 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

Sign in or create an account to view this information

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

West Virginia Humanities Council, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Executive Director

Dr. C. Kenneth Sullivan

BIO

Ken Sullivan has been Executive Director of the West Virginia Humanities Council since February 1997. A native of Virginia, he came to West Virginia more than twenty years ago as an instructor of Appalachian history at the Southern Appalachian Center of Antioch University in Beckley. From 1979 to 1997 he edited Goldenseal, West Virginia's popular folklife magazine. He is a historian, specializing in the regional history and culture of Appalachia. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh, an M.A. from the University of Rochester, and a B.A. from the University of Virginia, all in American History.

STATEMENT FROM THE Executive Director

"I am pleased to report that we have had an excellent year at the Humanities Council.

The Council again succeeded in providing educational programming and grant opportunities throughout all geographic areas of West Virginia. In 2015, we served a combined 44 counties with a total of 153 programs and 70 grants. Mark Twain was among 15 “History Alive!" characters active statewide.

We expanded and renewed for a second year our “This Week in West Virginia History" broadcast partnership with West Virginia Public Radio. Daily segments are aired during morning and afternoon news time, and we hope you enjoy this programming.

Traffic to e-WV: The West Virginia Encyclopedia, remained robust. We are pleased with the use of our online encyclopedia by teachers and students – and by ordinary, curious West Virginians from across the state. e-WV reaches well beyond our own borders, as well. In 2015, site visits originated from every state in the U.S., plus 180 other countries. And we expect visits to increase even further, now that e-WV has been upgraded to make it compatible with mobile devices.

We were pleased to hire Emily Hilliard as West Virginia's first official state folklorist in November. The Council is grateful for the support of the National Endowment for the Arts, which made this new position possible. This is an exciting new program direction for us, and a promising new funding relationship.

As I am sure many of you are aware, the West Virginia Book Festival returned in 2015 after a two-year hiatus, with the Council serving as a principal sponsor. The 2015 Book Fest drew visitors from 95 communities in West Virginia, and from a dozen other states. We are delighted with the return of this event and encouraged by its growing popularity.

The Council is deeply appreciative of donations from hundreds of private citizens, foundations and businesses, and for the continued public dollars coming to our organization. We are particularly grateful for support received from state government through the West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts.

In closing, I thank you for your support of the humanities and ask that you join the West Virginia Humanities Council and colleagues nationwide in wishing a happy 50th anniversary to the National Endowment for the Humanities, signed into law by President Johnson in 1965.

Sincerely,


Paul G. Papadopoulos, President
"

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Paul Papadopoulos

Attorney

Term: May 2014 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Race & Ethnicity
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Full-Time Staff and Volunteers.
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Full-Time Staff and Volunteers.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Full-Time Staff and Volunteers.

Diversity Strategies
No
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity