Human Services

Region A Partnership for Children

  • Sylva, NC
  • http://www.regionakids.org

Mission Statement

The mission of the Region A Partnership for Children (RAPC) is to improve the quality of life for young children and families in western North Carolina by encouraging advocacy and collaboration and funding services that focus on prevention and early intervention. We serve as the non-profit organization that administers North Carolina’s Smart Start and NC Pre-K initiatives in the seven western-most counties and on the Qualla Boundary. The overall goal of the Partnership is to ensure that all children arrive at school healthy and prepared to succeed.


The RAPC encourages our staff and providers to share best-practices, tips, and other helpful information with one another and the families we serve. Information sharing is an integral part of growing our services and strengthening our programs to better serve our region.

What is Smart Start?

The North Carolina Early Education Initiative to ensure that all children are healthy and ready to succeed when they enter kindergarten. Programs funded through Smart Start serve children under six before they enter kindergarten in the areas of early care and education, family support and health.

What Are Smart Start Programs?

The Region A Partnership for Children offers a number of different programs that are available to our regional families and care providers.

Child Care Subsidy: Provides Smart Start Subsidy payments for children when state subsidies are not available for eligible families

Quality Infant Toddler Bonuses: Provide additional payments to supplement the high cost of infant care in childcare centers that provide high quality care for infants and toddlers.

WAGE$: Provides childcare teachers and directors enrolled in early childhood degree programs with salary supplements tied to their level of education. WAGE$ supplements support professional development and higher education for childcare teachers, raise quality and reduce turnover in childcare.

Child Care Health Consultants: Nurses employed by Public Health Departments assist childcare providers in identifying the specific health and safety issues of their community such as nutrition, obesity, asthma, chronic illness and then design training strategies and professional development for improving related outcomes for children.

Regional Training: On site technical assistance and training for childcare staff related to quality enhancement and supporting healthy social/emotional development and positive behavior.

Raising a Reader: A Coordinator assists childcare providers in seven counties in working with families to distribute nationally recognized literacy materials to children to increase the frequency of reading at home and raise the level of understanding of the importance of reading both in the home and in the childcare centers.

Reach Out and Read: Doctors, nurse practitioners, and other medical professionals incorporate Reach Out and Read’s evidence-based model into regular pediatric checkups, by advising parents about the importance of reading aloud and giving developmentally-appropriate books to children.

Family Support Network: Provide support and information for parents/caregivers with children with special needs to help them connect with appropriate resources as well as with other caregivers with similar circumstances to build community support in coping with their shared concerns.

Parents as Teachers Programs: Parent educators utilize a national curriculum in a home visitation program while providing developmental information, encouraging early literacy, responding to parents’ concerns about child rearing and linking families to community resources (six county programs).

Reading Rover: Library outreach in Swain, Jackson and Macon Counties and the Cherokee Indian Reservation (Qualla Boundary) to preschool classrooms that provides access for children to age appropriate literacy materials, story telling and a variety of unique multi-cultural materials.

Main Programs

  1. NC Pre-K
  2. Smart Start
Service Areas

Self-reported

North Carolina

The Region A Partnership for Children serves the seven southwestern most counties of North Carolina. (Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Jackson, Macon, Swain, and the Qualla Boundary.

ruling year

1994

Executive Director

Self-reported

Ms. Janice Edgerton

Keywords

Self-reported

Early childhood education, family support, children with special needs, healthy children,

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EIN

56-1869575

 Number

0613103456

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The Region A Partnership for Children is committed to sound financial stewardship of funds, collaboration with the community, building the capacity of our own and partnering organizations, and the provision of effective services to children and families.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

NC Pre-K

Administrator for the region’s North Carolina high quality pre-kindergarten program. The NC Pre-K Program is designed to provide high-quality educational experiences to enhance school readiness for eligible four-year-olds.

Category

Early Childhood Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

None

None

Budget

$2,455,590.00

Program 2

Smart Start

The North Carolina Early Education Initiative to ensure that all children are healthy and ready to succeed when they enter kindergarten.

Category

Children & Youth Services

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

None

None

Budget

$2,282,933.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The Region A Partnership for Children works to build capacity and quality within the early care and education community by providing resources and opportunities for professional development, obtaining advanced licensing credentials, provider educational attainment, quality curriculum and materials, safe and healthy environments for children, and support for children with special needs or behavioral challenges.

    The Region A Partnership for Children works to build capacity within families by providing parents education and resources and support for families of children with special needs.

    The Region A Partnership for Children works to build capacity within children by supporting safe and healthy learning environments, literacy programs, collaboration with health care providers, and increasing the availability of high quality child care and early educational opportunities.

    Ongoing and long-term evaluation of data collection provides feedback on the success and guidance on changes required for success in achieving these goals.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Using Appreciate Inquiry as a guide, the Region A Partnership for Children engages in strategic planning with community stakeholders and families to develop goals, connections and leverage resources within the community. Teams of these stakeholders are facilitated and supported in each county served as well as the Qualla Boundary.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    The Region A Partnership for Children (RAPC) is in a unique position to facilitate successful collaboration of the region served. Representatives from agencies that serve families and each County and the Qualla Boundary serve on the Board of Directors or an advisory committee. For over 20 years Region A representatives have crossed barriers typically experienced in regional program participation. By providing technical assistance in program management, evaluation and financial monitoring to participating agencies the RAPC builds capacity and encourages participation in organizational efforts.

    The RAPC is primarily funded through the state of North Carolina but has also been successful in securing funding from private sector sources and is the beneficiary of annual endowment distributions.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    In addition to self-initialed and in-house evaluation, the Region A Partnership for Children is measured by state and self-selected quality indicators reported through the Performance Based Incentive System (PBIS). PBIS provides annual analysis of movement in indicators such as the early care and education systems, child health and safety, and family support systems. In addition to these measures, The RAPC is regularly monitored for outcomes by supporting agencies.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Ongoing community collaboration and evaluation provides continual feedback on the progress of program activities and the level of success in achieving long-term goals. In addition, an annual review of program outcomes and financial efficiency is conducted by a non-conflicted and knowledgeable advisory committee to determine the allocation of future resources and efforts. Activities are modified, added or eliminated to address findings born out of the evaluation and strategic planning process.

    Risks and obstacles include reductions in support for early care and education programs as well as state policy changes to the early care and education system.
Service Areas

Self-reported

North Carolina

The Region A Partnership for Children serves the seven southwestern most counties of North Carolina. (Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Jackson, Macon, Swain, and the Qualla Boundary.

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Region A Partnership for Children
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Region A Partnership for Children

Leadership

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Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
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  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Executive Director

Ms. Janice Edgerton

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ms. Mary Otto Selzer

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


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BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?