Educational Institutions

National Association of SAVE (Students Against Violence Everywhere), Inc.

  • Raleigh, NC
  • www.nationalsave.org

Mission Statement

The National Association of Students Against Violence Everywhere (SAVE), Inc. is a public nonprofit organization striving to decrease the potential for violence in our schools and communities by promoting meaningful student involvement, education and service opportunities in efforts to provide safer environments for youth.

Main Programs

  1. SAVE
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

Students Against Violence Everywhere (SAVE) can be modified to suit the needs of school and community groups. The SAVE Essentials Manual offers step-by-step procedures for the implementation of SAVE as a chapter or into a total school or classroom setting. SAVE is currently being implemented in elementary, middle and high schools, on college campuses, in youth-serving organizations, at community centers, and in faith based organizations.

ruling year

2001

Executive Director since 2010

Self-reported

Carleen Wray

Keywords

Self-reported

violence prevention, school, student, service learning, service projects, empowerment, leadership, school violence, bullying, youth suicide,

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Also Known As

SAVE

EIN

56-2242334

 Number

3112220793

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Student Services and Organizations (B80)

Youth Community Service Clubs (O51)

Crime Prevention N.E.C. (I20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Since 1989 SAVE has been engaging students in meaningfulviolence prevention efforts within their schools and communities and empowering youth with knowledge and skills necessary to provide this service. SAVE encourages positive peer influences through violence prevention efforts andeducates students about the effects and consequences of violence as well as safe activities for students, parents, and the community. SAVE has 2000 chapters in schools and communities in 48 states. Students who participate in SAVE demonstrate increased self-esteem, confidence, public speaking skills, andknowledge about different violence prevention strategies. Scientific research concludes that students who attend schools that are safe and secure and free of fear will perform better academically because the environment is more conducive to learning. As reported by students, advisors and principals, SAVE improves school environments by teaching students how tomanage and resolve conflict. Students report that they joined SAVE to make their school a safer place. Students who participate in SAVE play an important role in creating a safe campus and community by practicing nonviolence, makinghealthy decisions, possessing positive attitudes, and being good role-models.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

SAVE

SAVE chapters in middle and high schools meet during or after school to plan activities to promote safer school environments. The SAVE approach at the elementary schools integrates important knowledge and skills about safety into academic disciplines and provides children with opportunities to practice skills in activities that will make their schools safer. Students K-12 can learn conflict management skills which they will use throughout their lives. Workshops on SAVE are presented across the country for students, law-enforcement, teachers, coaches, community groups, and parents who are interested in implementing SAVE in their school or community. Each year a national Youth Summit is held where students present sessions on how they have made a difference in their schools and communities and exchange ideas with other students from across the country. On-going technical assistance is provided to students across the country and their SAVE chapters.

Category

Youth Development, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

None

None

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Students Against Violence Everywhere…

    - engages students in meaningful violence prevention efforts within their school and community.
    - empowers youth with knowledge and skills necessary to provide service to their community and school.
    - encourages positive peer influences within the school and community through violence prevention efforts.
    - educates students about the effects and consequences of violence as well as safe activities for students, parents, and the community.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Students Against Violence Everywhere has undertaken a triad approach for students working for empowerment and for safety
    in their schools and communities. The approach includes the three Essential Elements of crime prevention, conflict
    management, and service projects. Lesson plans and activities for all grade levels and settings are included for each of the
    three areas in the SAVE Essentials Manual. Guidelines for completing service projects are also included in the manual.
    Service projects can be utilized in all violence prevention related areas.

    SAVE is a program designed to involve and empower students to prevent violence. It is obvious that crime and violence are linked. Juvenile crime is not the only target of this element, but all crime in general. Juvenile victimization is an area of concern in SAVE
    chapters addressing crime related issues. Youth between the ages of 12 - 19 are victims of crime twice as often as any adult age group in the United States, including the elderly. SAVE encourages youth to learn where they are safe in their schools and communities and why it is important to have rules and laws. SAVE members learn to practice personal safety awareness and civic responsibility in crime prevention. Lesson plans in these areas are included in the SAVE Essentials Manual. Youth in SAVE are encouraged to coordinate and participate in service projects that aid in the prevention of crime.

    Conflicts happen to everyone ... everywhere ... everyday. Unfortunately, often conflicts can escalate into violence and people are hurt or even killed ... many of these people are youth. SAVE works to promote the management of conflicts for the safety of everyone involved. Youth are taught that conflicts are a normal part of life, but that violence is not part of that normality. Conflicts can be useful if you are open and willing to learn from them! Realistically, though, not all conflicts can be resolved. Sometimes we have to agree to disagree. Therefore, using the term conflict “management” is important. The SAVE Essentials Manual has detailed lesson plans
    on managing conflicts between others, active listening skills, and even bullying prevention. Again, SAVE youth are encouraged to participate in service projects in and around the areas of conflict management.

    Learning by doing is a key component of SAVE. Empowering students to get involved in hands-on efforts to prevent violence is the most rewarding learning experience of SAVE. SAVE is a way for youth to get involved! The SAVE Essentials Manual has guidelines
    for creating a successful service project, as well as service project ideas.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Through a cadre of volunteers and the resourcefulness of student members, SAVE chapters are growing and making a positive difference across the nation. SAVE is a unique and powerful approach to youth safety because it recognizes the role that young people can take in making schools and communities safer. Because SAVE chapters are established and operated by students, the opportunity to spread the message of nonviolence to young people and their communities is enhanced when SAVE chapters exist. Focusing on crime prevention, conflict management and service to the school and community, SAVE students are providing positive peer influences in violence prevention efforts.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Evidence is building that SAVE is an effective program. Research conducted with SAVE chapters and advisors revealed that incidents of violence decreased in many schools, and the number of weapons brought into schools has been reduced as well. The beliefs and attitudes of students towards violence show positive improvement. Knowledge and skills of handling conflicts without violence were gained, and youth become better informed of ways to not only be safe, but also to make their schools and communities safer. As reported by the Evaluation Training Institute in Los Angeles, California, students who participate in SAVE demonstrate increased self-esteem and confidence, conflict resolution, presentation/public speaking, and knowledge about different violence prevention strategies. Advisors report that they successfully involve students in organizing and implementing community activities, meeting
    weekly as a club, and making people aware of the program. Principals believe that students who participate in the SAVE program play an important role in creating a safe campus and community by practicing nonviolence, possessing positive attitudes, and being good role-models.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    A qualitative evaluation on SAVE‘s positive influences on the students and the school environment was conducted utilizing the CDC’s Division of Adolescent and School Health School Health Index (SHI), which is an on-line interactive assessment tool that school team members completed in order to identify a safety or violence prevention area for improvement. SAVE chapter members successfully developed and implemented programs to improve these identified areas. Success was determined through student-written success
    stories, a tool designed to show a program’s progress over time as well as its value and impact. These Success Stories reflected the efforts of SAVE students working to improve school connectedness, build respect, and establish a safer physical environment, as well as decreasing harassment and bullying at their schools.
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

Students Against Violence Everywhere (SAVE) can be modified to suit the needs of school and community groups. The SAVE Essentials Manual offers step-by-step procedures for the implementation of SAVE as a chapter or into a total school or classroom setting. SAVE is currently being implemented in elementary, middle and high schools, on college campuses, in youth-serving organizations, at community centers, and in faith based organizations.

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SAVE (STUDENTS AGNST VIOLENCE EVRYWHERE)
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

National Association of SAVE (Students Against Violence Everywhere), Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Executive Director

Carleen Wray

BIO

Carleen Wray(http://www.guidestar.org/mailtcwray@nationalsave.org) is the Executive Director of the National Association of Students Against ViolenceEverywhere (SAVE).  She was drawn to her current position because of her desire to ensure that youth are safe in their schools and communities. Her previous work in the juvenilejustice field exposed her to the fact that youth today are in need of assistance to ensure that their schools are free of crime and conducive to learning and their communities are safe. Ms. Wray served as the Assistant Director of SAVE from 2001-2010. Prior to that she served as the Assistant Director of the Center for the Prevention of School Violence from its inception in 1993. In this position she was a primary point of contact for information, programs, and research about the problem of school violence and efforts directed at preventing it from occurring. Her work provided a bridge for cooperation between various agencies involved in school violence prevention. Ms. Wray has also worked with the NC Department ofCorrection and the NC Injury Prevention Division. She  served as a Pre-trial release coordinator and has worked extensively in the juvenile justice arena. Ms. Wray has spoken at many conferences across the country and has conducted numerous youth safety implementation workshops. She is viewed as a national expert on youth violence prevention and has been interviewed by numerous local, state, national, and international media. She holds a bachelor's degree in Justiceand Public Policy from North Carolina Wesleyan in Rocky Mount, NC and has completed masters level's classes in Public Administration at North Carolina State University. She is a certified court mediator, and is also national trainer for law-related education and conflict management projects.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. James Wise

Chapel Hill High School

Term: July 2013 - June 2017

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
Yes
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
Yes
We have a diversity plan