Medical Research

Rheumatology Research Foundation

  • Atlanta, GA
  • http://rheumresearch.org

Mission Statement

Advancing research and training to improve the health of people with rheumatic diseases.

Main Programs

  1. Rheumatology Investigator Award
  2. Rheumatology Scientist Development Award
  3. Innovative Research Awards
  4. Fellowship Training Award
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

Only rheumatology professionals, academic centers and other physician groups within the United States are eligible to apply for Foundation grants.

ruling year

1988

Executive Director since 2014

Self-reported

Ms. Mary J Wheatley

Vice President, Development since 2007

Self-reported

Paula J Reed

Keywords

Self-reported

arthritis, lupus, medical, research, rheumatic, rheumatology, joints, muscles, bones, rheumatoid, osteoporosis, scleroderma, spondylitis, gout, osteoarthritis

Notes from the Nonprofit

The Foundation's work is imperative to improve patient outcomes and the field of rheumatology. If you haven't already, you can make your own gift to the Foundation. Visit www.rheumresearch.org to learn more.

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EIN

58-1654301

 Number

8305561556

Physical Address

2200 Lake Boulevard NE

Atlanta, GA 30319

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Arthritis (H51)

Specifically Named Diseases (G80)

Medical Specialty Research (H90)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The crowning achievement of the Rheumatology Research Foundation continues to be the success of the Journey to Cure Campaign: The Campaign to Advance Patient Care and Accelerate Discoveries.
To date, the Foundation has raised more than $58 million toward the campaign goal of $60 million. These funds have been directly invested in the Foundation's research and training programs to advance the mission of the Foundation. Foundation programs align with the organization's two mission priorities: Workforce development (recruitment and training of future rheumatology clinicians and researchers) and Innovative research (funding research that will lead to future treatments and cures for rheumatic diseases). The impact of Foundation programs is measured by carefully tracking metrics determined by the strategic plan. These include such items as: the number of rheumatology fellowship graduates each year; geographic distribution of rheumatologists; the number of additional NIH grants made to Foundation-funded investigators; and patents resulting from Foundation-funded work and meetings.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Rheumatology Investigator Award

The purpose of the Rheumatology Investigator Award is to provide support for basic science and clinical investigators engaged in research relevant to the rheumatic diseases for the period between the completion of post-doctorate fellowship training and establishment as an independent investigator.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

Adults

Females, all ages or age unspecified

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Budget

$3,750,000.00

Program 2

Rheumatology Scientist Development Award

The purpose of the Rheumatology Scientist Development Award is to provide support for a structured, formal, clinical or basic science research training program for rheumatologists or health professionals in the field of rheumatology. This award is designed for individuals in the early stages of their career or those without significant prior research experience who plan to embark on careers in biomedical and/or clinical research in arthritis and rheumatic diseases.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

Adults

Females, all ages or age unspecified

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Budget

$2,250,000.00

Program 3

Innovative Research Awards

Through a rigorous grant application and peer-review process, the Foundation identifies the projects that are likely to yield the best results.
Innovative Basic Research Grants - These awards provide support for investigators to conduct exploratory research on new issues or approaches for which there is currently an insufficient theoretical or empirical basis for a competitive Research Project application. In contrast to research projects, research proposed in Innovative Basic Research applications may be formative in nature and need not be designed to produce definitive results.
Translational Research Grants - Focus on the direct study of patients and patient-derived materials to improve our understanding of RA. Basic research into the mechanisms of disease has accelerated in recent years, but the knowledge gained has been slow to reach the clinic and patient care. Both the translation of basic research knowledge into improved patient care and the translation of clinical insights into hypotheses that can be validated in the laboratory are important to accelerating RA research.
Clinical Research Grants - Focus on issues that directly affect the quality of care in clinical practice of rheumatology and patient access. For example, improving our understanding of the health economics and benefits of current therapies will increase appropriate access to novel therapies. In addition, addressing disparities in health care access is necessary to improve the overall health of the population. Finally, finding methods to identify individuals at risk for developing RA will move the treatment of this disease into earlier stages of its development and even allow for the prevention of RA.

Category

Medical Research

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Adults

Physically Disabled nec

Budget

$6,000,000.00

Program 4

Fellowship Training Award

The purpose of the Fellowship Training Award is to help ensure a diverse and highly trained workforce is available to provide competent clinical care to those affected by rheumatic diseases.

Category

Population(s) Served

Adults

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Physically Disabled nec

Budget

$750,000.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Workforce Development: The foundation will expand the rheumatology workforce to meet the needs of people with rheumatic diseases.

    Targeted research: The Foundation will support a targeted research agenda that leads to improve treatments and cures for the rheumatic diseases.

    Brand Awareness. The Foundation will increase awareness of the foundation and its programs

    Financial Resources. The Foundation will provide funding that supports the expansion of its programs to fulfill its mission.

    Organization. The Foundation will build organizational capacity in accordance with programmatic, fundraising, and marketing goals and needs.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Expanding Rheumatology Workforce - The Foundation devotes about 50 percent of its funding to education, training and career development. The portfolio includes the following grants: Student and Resident Preceptorships, Fellowship Training Awards, Scientist Development Awards, Investigator Awards, and Clinician Scholar Educator Awards. Abstract awards and outreach awards are also included in this category.
    Supporting Targeted Research - The Targeted Research program began in 2007 with a focus on Rheumatoid Arthritis and provided $30 million to fund the most innovative approaches to this chronic disease. In 2012, the program was expanded to include other forms of inflammatory arthritis including spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. About 50 percent of the Foundation's funding is devoted to targeted research, including basic, translational and clinical research grants.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Internal Resources - The foundation employs approximately 18.25 FTE staff and shares overhead and other resources with the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), which allows the foundation to remain extremely efficient with donor funds. The focus of the foundation over the past few years has been on major gifts fundraising, and it does not spend a lot of effort on special events or other less effective means of fundraising.

    External Strengths - The biggest strength of the Foundation is its relationship with the ACR and its industry partners. Over the past 10 years, the ACR has donated more than $10 million to the foundation to support it mission and improve the health of people with rheumatic disease. Industry partners have also been very generous to the Foundation donating more than $50 million over the past five years. The Foundation's relationship with the ACR has also been important to its success in the rheumatology community and its strong relationship with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Representatives from the NIH participate in all investigators meetings and assist with regular review of the awards portfolio.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    The Foundation has a rigorous progress reporting mechanism. Each year, every award recipient is required to complete a progress report which indicates that scientific milestones are being met, award funds are being used properly and all investigators are leveraging foundation funded research to actively pursue additional funding support from the NIH and other funding sources.

    The Foundation uses the following metrics to determine the success of its programs:

    1. Number of NIH Grants Received: One of the purposes of the Foundation's awards is to prepare young rheumatology investigators to become fully independent by receiving larger NIH grants. As a result, the Foundation tracks subsequent NIH funding at K and R levels received by investigators during and post-award.

    2. Publications: Another measure of success for rheumatology investigators is the number of scientific papers they have been published as a result of the work funded by the Foundation.

    3. Advanced Degrees: The foundation also supports Clinician Scholar Educators by paying for protected time within an academic environment so that rheumatology educators can focus efforts on teaching medical student and residents about rheumatology. Some of the funds also provide tuition for these educators to receive advanced degrees in relation to these efforts.

    4. Scientific Productivity: Another measure of success for scientific investigators is the number of presentations that have been made based on Foundation-funded research. The number of presentations at a specific meeting indicates the powerful influence this type of research is making in the field of rheumatology, and it is a direct measure of scientific productivity.

    5. Effective use of Foundation Funds: Grant recipients are required to account for all grant funding on an annual basis. These expenditures must adhere to the budgets submitted with their grant application, and any unused funds are returned to the Foundation at the end of the award period. The Foundation also limits the amount of funding that can be used for indirect expenses (institutional overhead) to eight percent of all expenses. This is significantly lower than the industry standard and the average NIH indirect allowances which can be more than 20 percent.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Expanding the Rheumatology Workforce: Since the Foundation began its own peer-reviewed research program in 2000, the number of fellows completing rheumatology training has nearly doubled from approximately 105 fellows per year in 2000 to more than 200 fellows finishing rheumatology training in 2012.

    Medical Student Recruitment: Nearly half of those who complete Foundation preceptorships chose rheumatology as their subspecialty.

    Scientific Progress: 70 percent of Foundation investigators have received additional funding, 72 percent have been selected to present and publish their work and 85 percent remain in an academic environment, which is crucial to advancing treatment and finding cures.

    Specific Metrics - The Foundation is proud to report on the following achievements over the past five years (2009-2013):
    1. Number of NIH Grants Received: 70 grants valued at over $65,874,114.00
    2. Publications: 610 publications resulting from Foundation funding
    3. Advanced Degrees: 108 degrees received as a key indicator of career progression
    4. Scientific Productivity: 1060 scientific reports selected for presentation at scientific meetings worldwide.
    5. Effective use of Foundation Funding: Approximately 7% ($3,564,407) of unused funding has been returned to the foundation to use towards future grants.
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

Only rheumatology professionals, academic centers and other physician groups within the United States are eligible to apply for Foundation grants.

Additional Documents

Social Media

Funding Needs

The field of rheumatology is at a pivotal point in its history. By 2025, demand for rheumatologists to treat millions of patients suffering from rheumatic diseases will outpace the number of rheumatologists in adult practice by 45% percent. It is essential to the future of rheumatology that more well-trained and qualified rheumatologists are entering this field while also making advancements in current patient care. Today, due in large part to REF efforts, including an extensive awards and grants program, the number of fellows completing rheumatology training programs has increased by more than 50 percent. The REF annually funds approximately $11 million in awards and grants to almost 200 individuals and institutional grant recipients – dollars that will translate into improved care for the one in three American adults who suffer from arthritis and rheumatic disease.

Accreditations

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External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

RHEUMATOLOGY RESEARCH FOUNDATION
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Rheumatology Research Foundation

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Executive Director

Ms. Mary J Wheatley

Vice President, Development

Paula J Reed

STATEMENT FROM THE Executive Director

"The Rheumatology Research Foundation is the largest private funding source of rheumatology training and research programs in the US. The Foundation's extensive awards and grants program helps recruit and train the next generation of rheumatology health professionals, while also advancing discoveries that lead to new treatments, and one day a cure for rheumatic diseases.

The Foundation has top ratings from two organizations that rate the efficiency and transparency of non-profits. Charity Navigator awarded the Foundation its highest four-star rating for seven years in a row. Guide Star Exchange awarded the Foundation the Gold participation level. These designations demonstrate our dedication to maintaining efficiency and transparency. Donors can rest assured that the Foundation will continue to use donations efficiently and effectively while being transparent about our work.

"

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Dr. Eric L. Matteson MD, MPH

Mayo Clinic

Term: Nov 2015 - Nov 2017

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?