Youth Development

Raising Expectations Inc

  • Atlanta, GA
  • www.raisingexpectations.org

Mission Statement

Raising Expectations (RE) was established in 1995 to provide youth living in Atlanta’s most economically and socially challenged communities with high quality  youth development programs. The mission of Raising Expectations is to educate, engage and empower youth in challenging circumstances by providing them with opportunities to build strong academic skills, leadership skills and self-confidence. Raising Expectations sets high standards of excellence by raising the academic, social and civic expectations of each child, while exposing them to the world of opportunity beyond their neighborhoods and encouraging children to become critical thinkers.

Main Programs

  1. Project DREAM
  2. Project STEMWARE
  3. Project RISE
Service Areas

Self-reported

Georgia

For 20 years, Raising Expectations has provided impactful youth development programming for over 700 youth in Atlanta communities including Decatur, East Lake, Pittsburgh, Vine City, English Avenue, Washington Park, Simpson Rd. and Donald Lee Hollowell Pkwy Corridor.

ruling year

2001

Principal Officer

Self-reported

Ms. Maria Armstrong

Co Principal Officer

Self-reported

Ms. Tangee L Allen

Keywords

Self-reported

mentoring, academic tutoring, youth development, education, volunteer internships, academic improvement, youth leadership, social development, truancy reduction

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012.
Register now

Also Known As

R.E. Inc.

EIN

58-2395581

 Number

1146729930

Physical Address

50 Sunset Ave. #92814

Atlanta, GA 30314

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Single Organization Support (O11)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Youth Centers, Clubs, (includes Boys/Girls Clubs)- Multipurpose (O20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Summary

During the 2011-2012 school year Raising Expectations offered the following
programming options for enrolled students:

Project DREAM
(Developing Raised Expectations for Adolescent Minds), occurs for
children and youth in the 3rd – 8th grade.  During this phase of
supplemental support services, students participate in activities 5 days per
week in the afternoons and 1 weekend per month. Over the course of a year,
students enrolled in Raising Expectations can receive at least 35 home and
school visits, 385 hours of mentoring and personal development support, along
with 270 hours of tutoring and academic support.

Project STEMWARE (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math While Accomplishing Raised Expectations) RE 9th – 12th grade students participate in Math & Science strategic tutorials,
college access coaching, mentoring and career exploration opportunities in the
STEM fields.  Over the course of a school year students can receive 324
hours of direct and strategic support.  Additionally, RE participants
enrolled in college receive mentoring, resource support and opportunities to
remain engaged with RE programs when home for college breaks. 

Project
RISE (Raising Interest in STEM
Education), a 6-week thematic, project-based, and experiential learning
summer camp for 1st through 8th graders. Some of
the themes for this year’s camp were healthy living, ecosystems & the
environment, music & the arts, STEM and the Olympics.

While
the 2011-2012 school year presented several challenges, with creative problem
solving, resourcefulness and willing partners, Raising Expectations was able to
serve 160 children and youth that reside on the Westside of Atlanta.  The children and youth who participate in our
specialized programs attended the following schools within the Atlanta Public
School District: Mary
M. Bethune Elementary School, John F. Kennedy Middle
School, Fredrick
Douglass High School, Booker
T. Washington High School, Herndon Elementary School, The New Schools at Carver, M.
Agnes Jones Elementary School, andNorth Atlanta High School

Noted
below you will find tables that describe and define the demographic population
of participants served through all of Raising Expectations aforementioned
programs (Project DREAM, Project STEMWARE & Project RISE).

 

 
 
 *The remaining 25
students were also enrolled in Project DREAM. Source: KidTrax nFocus Solutions

 

Source: KidTrax: nFocus Solutions® and RE
application 

 

Source: KidTrax: nFocus Solutions
 

 

*IEP-
Individualized Education Plans. Source: KidTrax: nFocus Solutions® and RE application

 

Project
DREAM:

Support provided for 3rd – 8th grade
students.

Academic Tutorial Academy:  (3 days per week @ 2.5 hours per day)            

·      
Bethune Elementary- 28 student(s)

·      
M. Agnes Jones
Elementary- 2 student(s)

·      
Herndon Elementary- 1 student(s)

·      
Kennedy Middle- 67 student(s)

·      
Home Schooled- 1 student(s)

·      
Start of School
Year Enrollment: 99                                           
·      
End of School Year
Enrollment: 62
 

Academic Achievements:

· Percentage of Kennedy
Middle School students who remained in Raising Expectations and met or exceeded
CRCT requirements for:

o  
Math- 55.5%

o  
Reading- 84.4%

o  
Language Arts- 84.4%

·25 middle
school students participated in school based after school programming (sports,
arts etc.) in partnership with Kennedy Middle School

·All
elementary and middle school students had access to at least 80 minutes of CRCT
support weekly using the PLATO PLE curriculum (as the computer lab and internet
access was made available & when not participating in school sponsored
afternoon activities) 

·Secured web based curriculum
donation from Plato Learning: valued at $28,000

·Secured web based curriculum
donation from My On Reader: valued at $6,000

 Educational
Alliance:

·Trained volunteers, as well as
staff, visited participants during school hours and engaged in discussions with
teachers designed to support academic achievement and personal development of
participants. Approximately 256 school visits occurred. Approximately 213 home
visits and phone calls were completed to date.

Social
Discovery Projects: (14 Weekend Fieldtrips)

· Microsoft Tech Day
@ the Microsoft Store at Lenox Mall – students and their mentors participated
in workshops on how to use some of Microsoft’s latest technologies.

· Cavalia- a fresh
mix of equestrian and performing arts, multimedia and special effects. Cavalia
is a spectacular and moving tribute to the relationship between men and horses
throughout history, a dream of freedom, cooperation and harmony.

· The Police
Athletic League Mayor’s Cup Boxing Tournament
·Rock Climbing @ Adrenaline Climbing

·Take a Student to
College Day- Mentors shared a great deal of
information, including the many benefits of going to a college or university,
descriptions of the schools of higher learning in the area, the college
admissions process, and selecting and paying for a college or university.
Students were able to experience a day in the life of a college student for the
entire day on the campuses of Morehouse, Spelman and Clark Atlanta University.

·Spelman College
D.I.V.A.S. Conference- Sponsored by the Spelman College Annual Girls Leadership
Institute, a select group of D.I.V.A.S (Disciplined, Informed, Visible, and
Active Students) from around the city of Atlanta participated in a day long
leadership conference where they engaged in discussions concentrating on leadership,
oratorical, and interpersonal development.

·Morehouse College
Graves Hall Haunted House Mentor/Mentee Activity

·Mentor/Mentee
Roller Skating @ Metro Lanes

·College Access
Workshop – 4 hour workshop that included speakers and presenters that shared
information about the college admissions process and how to avoid obstacles
during the first year of college. 
Practice opportunities with writing personal statements and reviewing scholarship
opportunities took place as well.

·Viewing of Ghetto Physics @ Robert W. Woodruff
Library-

An in-your-face wake-up call, GhettoPhysics shows how the game of life is
played—and it’s all the same game! From the corner offices of Wall Street to
the inner sanctums of world governments, from the red light districts in the
ghettos to the living rooms behind the white-picket fences on Main Street, game
is happening. And if you don’t know it, the game is going to roll right over
you.

·Atlanta History
Center sponsored by the Children’s Museum of Atlanta

·Grooming &
Etiquette Symposium – mentors led sessions on personal grooming, hygiene and
goal setting during this 3 hour session. Activities included a fashion show
that identified appropriate and inappropriate attire for a variety of life
scenarios, along with a luncheon that taught youth how to eat in different
settings just to name a few.

·Atlanta Hawks vs.
Golden State Warriors

·Ceasar Mitchell
Test Prep Day in partnership with Kaplan

 

Enrichment
Activities: (2 days per week @ 2.5
hours per day for 8 week rotations)  RE Staff members or partners developed
these 19 activities and created weekly lesson plans using an RE designed
template that ensures the incorporation of a variety of learning modalities,
teaching strategies and academic core concepts.
· Worked with school coaches and
the athletic director to support student athletes with their dual
responsibility with academics and athletics

· Scheduled T/F
activities included the following options: 
 
- in
partnership with Spelman CollegeEngineering and Computer Science
department, the members of robotics team (SpelBots) provided interactive
lessons in Computer Science with the use of LEGO® Mindstorms interactive
software and hands on robot construction.
 

- Students gained theatrical experience from trained actress and drama
teacher, Jessica Williams. At the end of the 9-week theatre intensive, the students put on a performance for their friends and family.
 

Theory - Students engaged in physical
activity through different dance disciplines such as hip hop, ballroom,
interpretive, and ballet. By submerging the participants into new dance forms,
they were able to gain a broader view of dance and movement.

in partnership with the Children’s Museum of Atlanta elementary
school RE students were able to fuse art and science together, which made for
an awesome and invigorating learning experience.  The visual art component of the program assisted the
students in memorizing scientific concepts.

in partnership with PADV (Partnership Against Domestic
Violence) 8th grade students discussed dating and relationships
with relationship counselor Samantha Macedo from the Partnership Against
Domestic Violence. Students gained working knowledge of domestic violence and
how to recognize if they or someone they know is in an abusive relationshifamily, or a significant other. 
 8th grade boys discussed gender specific development concerns that were important to them. With the guidance of a male group leader and male volunteers, students were able to have positive male influences to assist them in making integral life decisions.

in partnership with the Spelman College Department of
Psychology, students attended
weekly sessions where they engaged in a range of interactive activities and
service projects that focused on being a leader in their family, school, and
community. Leadership development was examined in context of various theme
areas including enhancing positive attitudes and behavior, academic challenges,
positive thinking, self-discipline and control, problem-solving and conflict
resolution, social skills training and dealing with peer pressure to name a
few.

- Through
physical activity, participants learned sportsmanlike conduct by working as a
team.  They were able to engage in
team building activities that brought them out of their comfort zones forcing
them rely on their teammates to ensure that they were successful in completing
a desired task. By the end of the term, students displayed a heightened sense
of camaraderie and compassion for their peers.

Games - Hunger Games was an
organized team competition based activity around the popular book and movie
sharing the same name. Each week, instructors chose a team based activity and
had students compete against each other. The purpose of Hunger Games was to
teach students about teamwork and how to work together to accomplish a task.
Students learned how to communicate effectively and plan towards accomplishing
a group goal. 

provided introductory contemporary keyboard and piano instruction. The goal was
to develop strong musical skills through keyboard playing, theory and keyboard
harmony, music reading, writing, and composing. Students learned sight reading, aural skills, musical
symbols, analysis of harmonic, melodic, and rhythmic structures, and finger
facility in all keys 
 
- This enrichment focused on
vocal training. Students were able to gain deeper understanding and proficiency
of the voice as an instrument. The students learned introductory knowledge of
proper specific vocal training techniques. After implementing the lessons students gained
knowledge of ensemble listening, chord/pitch theory, rhythms, melodies and
harmonies, improvisation techniques, practice techniques, various styles, and
overall musicianshiare indeed an extension of the African American culture. Thus
demonstrating how music has always been an expression of social, political and
cultural climates. We sought to engage students and extend them beyond passive
participation in cultural norms, but to actively use their voices to speak to
their view of our community.

- This enrichment introduced the
fundamentals of American Sign Language (ASL) used by the Deaf Community,
including basic vocabulary, syntax, fingerspelling, and grammatical non-manual
signals. It focused on communicative competence. It also develops gestural
skills as a foundation for ASL enhancement. Lastly, it introduced cultural
knowledge and increased understanding of the Deaf Community. By the end of the
course students were able to have basic conversations with one another using
sign language.

 
in partnership with the West End Performing Arts
Center, this enrichment was designed to introduce students to a different form
of art that they would not be exposed to under normal circumstances. Students
received instruction in hand building, along with slab rolling, sculpture and
various glazing techniques. This was a student centered learning class. After
learning the basics, the clay students chose what they wanted to create every
session.

- this enrichment was designed to be a small
group, “girls only”, peer-to-peer discussion session. Each meeting was designed
to openly discuss issues that directly affect teenage girls. These sessions
afforded them an opportunity to talk in a safe environment about their lives
and struggles. It was designed to build self- esteem and bring to light issues
of body image, healthy relationships, as well as leadership concepts. The
sessions also helped to build a sense of sisterhood that they can take with
them; learning how to build lasting friendships within the community of African
American women.

- Designed to present scientific concepts using creative
techniques, students were submerged into the science disciplines of chemistry,
biology, and earth science. Using hands on activities and visuals, students
were able to effectively learn the material taught in a fun and interactive
environment.

- Students were introduced to computer technology
through hands-on activities. They learned to distinguish between the parts of
the computer as well as its’ peripheral parts. Students worked in teams of four
to build their own computer towers and computer systems. They were able to
recognize and name different parts of a computer and their function.

 - a fun, hands-on way for the elementary
children to learn by moving, touching, exploring and using their senses all
help in developing creativity, planning, cognitive skills, knowledge, fine
motor skills, language and math skills as well as positively impacting one’s
self-esteem.

- Outdoor play is an essential part in a child’s life. Not only does
outdoor play promote physical activity and give kids a chance to release pent
up energy while having fun, but it also develops skills such as: exploring,
fine and gross motor skills, teamwork, and social skills. For this enrichment,
the goal is to continue developing those skills through structured outdoor fun. 

Summer Pathfinder:
Raising Expectations (RE) Summer Pathfinder Program provides
children and youth with opportunities to attend unique summer camps during the
summer months as a means of eliminating or reducing the effects of summer
slide.  RE’s Summer Pathfinder
Initiative is inclusive of Project RISE. 
 
Raising Expectations (RE)
helped a significant number of students participate in productive summer
activities and camps through its Summer Pathfinder Initiative. As part of this
initiative, R.E. researched, secured and continued partnerships with various
summer enrichment programs, marketed the programs to R.E. youth and parents and
helped facilitate the application process to ensure R.E. youth were enrolled
during the summer months.
 
Through the Summer
Pathfinder initiative, R.E. students were able to participate in the following
enrichment programs:

·25 RE youth transitioned
from our Academic Tutorial Academy into (Raised Interest in STEM Education), a 6-week thematic,
project-based, and experimental learning summer camp for 1st through
8th graders. The themes for this year’s camp were healthy living,
ecosystems & the environment, music & the arts, and the Olympics.

 

· 6 RE youth were accepted
into , an
academic summer enrichment program aimed at improving the educational
trajectory of middle students and inspiring young people to pursue the field of
education. Through this program, R.E. students were exposed to academic
enrichment, creative arts, multicultural programs and public speaking
opportunities.

 

· 3 RE youth participated in , a
week long camping excursion organized by the City of Atlanta’s Parks and
Recreation Department that gave younger students (ages 8-12) an exciting
opportunity to expand their appreciation of the great outdoors, make new
friends and learn teamwork and cooperation skills. Camp activities included
environmental education, tent camping, writing, swimming and talent shows.

·1 RE student participated in a 4-week camp
experience with the . C5 Georgia is an
intensive 5-year leadership and college readiness program targeted to high
potential teens from challenging situations. The 4-week camp experience allowed
the student to experience summer swimming, hiking
and learning archery. He was also able to acquire good leadership skills and
develop a tighter bond with himself and fellow participants at the C5 Youth
Foundation-GA. 

·2 RE students received
scholarships to participate in hosted by the College of Engineering at Georgia Institute of
Technology. Designed to offer middle school girls an early introduction to the
world to technology, engineering, and computing, TEC Camp inspires middle
school age girls to consider college majors and careers in these important
fields. The format is highly interactive and designed to address the specific
interests of middle school students. 

Project STEMWARE
Science Technology Engineering and
Math While Achieving Raised Expectations, or STEMWARE, provided 9th-12th
grade students with academic support with primary focuses on areas falling
within the STEM disciplines.

Academic
Tutorial Academy:

·      
Washington High
School- 27
student(s)

·      
North Atlanta High
School- 1 student(s)

·      
Douglass High
School- 1 student(s)

·      
The New Schools at
Carver- 1 student(s)

·      
Start of School
Year Enrollment: 30

·      
End of School Year
Enrollment: 15

Academic Achievements:

·      
Students
were provided with 56 hours of Mathematical and Physical Science academic
support over the duration of the STEMWARE initiative.

·      
All
STEMWARE students were provided with 60 minutes of EOCT support weekly for the
duration of the STEMWARE program.

·      
As
reported in Project STEMWARE’s program evaluation, students demonstrated increases
in math and science proficiency, thus an impact on students’ academic
performance.

·      
Students
participated in weekly public speaking workshops designed and led by an acting
coach

College Access and
Mentoring Support:
· STEMWARE students participated in
a proctored PSAT and SAT combo test administered by KAPLAN Test Prep and
Admissions (sponsored by Ceasar Mitchell’s Semi-Annual College Prep Series).

· Staff created college access
binders which were utilized during weekly college coaching sessions led by RE
CoFounders. Students dissected personal statements, review college
applications, researched schools and participated in discussions around not
only gaining access to college, financial aid & scholarships but also how
to avoid the pitfalls associated with the first year of college especially for
first generation students.

 
· STEMWARE students were provided
with the opportunity to participate in College Access Day. Tennessee State
University Alumnus, Stanford Strong, provided in depth insight into college
readiness. The presentation included, but was not limited to, writing
admissions essays and applying for financial aid assistance. The students
learned a substantial amount of information to get them prepared for college.

·Take A Student to College Day- Mentors
shared a great deal of information, including the many benefits of going to a
college or university, descriptions of the schools of higher learning in the
area, the college admissions process, and selecting and paying for a college or
university. Students were able to experience a day in the life of a college
student for the entire day on their mentor’s college campus.

· Six students participated in the
Hampton University Spring Break College Tour while five students participated
in the Tennessee State University Spring Break Tour. Each student was able to
tour the campus, converse with the students, and gain information about the universities.

·Employees of the Environment
Protection Agency presented a workshop with the STEMWARE students about careers
within the STEM discipline as well as basic skill sets required to work with
the EPA. EPA & RE staff have been in communication about designing an internship program for RE students.

·5 RE
youth were enrolled in ,
an intensive summer program that reinforces literacy and mathematics, helping
high school students prepare for the coming school year. Some R.E. students
attended commuter Project GRAD sessions held at Morehouse and Georgia State
University. Others participated in a residential Project GRAD program whereby
they stayed on campus at the University of Georgia and the University of West
Georgia.

Volunteer
“Community Change Agents” Program Development:
*(shared between Project DREAM
and STEMWARE)

 
 
· Retained 73 Volunteers from:

o  
Clark Atlanta University

o  
Morehouse College

o  
Spelman College

o  
Georgia State University

o  
Georgia Institute of Technology
 
The volunteers donated 3,325 hours and 12 minutes
this past school year.

Approximately
65% of the volunteers met the minimum requirements for participation (1
tutorial day per week  and 1 Saturdays per month, or 1
tutorial day and 1 enrichment day).

       
Completed Two Training Sessions
(Module 1 & 2) that offered mentors ongoing strategies, tutoring and
mentoring skill development, along with principles for relating to youth with
risk factors.
 
Recruited, oriented, completed
background checks and trained all volunteers that served during the year.
 
Partnerships

1.     Atlanta
Public Schools

2.     Children’s
Museum of Atlanta

3.     Spelman
College - Project L.I.F.T.

4.     Partnerships
Against Domestic Violence

5.     Breakthrough
Atlanta

6.     AmeriCorps

7.     The Center
for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing @ Georgia Tech
(CEISMC)

8.     C5 Youth
Foundation-GA

9.     Jack and
Jill of America- Atlanta Chapter

10.   Atlanta
Community Food Bank

11.   Morehouse
College

12.   West End
Performing Arts Center

13.   Spelman
College

14.   English
Avenue Neighborhood Association

15.   City of
Atlanta Parks & Recreation Department

16.   Atlanta
Police Department: Atlanta Community Impact Team

17. Junior
League of Atlanta
18.   Georgia
Tech University – Ivan Allen School of Liberal Arts

19.   Clark
Atlanta University

20.   Georgia
State University

21.   Environmental
Protection Agency

22.   MicroSoft
Store- Lenox Mall
 
In-kind
Donations

·      
John F. Kennedy Middle School

·      
Publix

·      
Popeye’s Chicken

·      
ULTA

·      
Target

·      
Robbie Conwell

·      
Chick-fil-a

·      
Spelman College

·      
Morehouse College

·      
West End Performing Arts Center

·      
Children’s Museum of Atlanta

·      
MicroSoft Store

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Project DREAM

Raising Expectations’ Out of School Time (OST) programs occur in two phases with the first being the most intensive and requiring the most concentrated effort. In Phase 1 students participate in a multi-layered program- Project D.R.E.A.M. (Developing Raised Expectations for Adolescent Minds), which occurs between the 3rd – 8th grade.  During this phase of supplemental support services, students participate in activities 5 days per week in the afternoons and 1weekend per month. Over the course of a year, students enrolled in Raising Expectations can receive  at least 35 home and school visits, 385 hours of mentoring and personal development support, along with 270 hours of tutoring and academic support. The specific programs for Project DREAM are as follows:
The Academic Tutoring Academy (3rd – 8th grade students) provides students with homework assistance, standardized test preparation, organization skills and features the inclusion of subject-specific tutoring in core classes such as Reading, English, Math, Social Studies and Science three days per week. Enriching Experiences:  RE youth engage in cultural, artistic, social, physical and leadership development enrichment activities two times per week.  We partner with agencies and use in house staff members that have the skills, resources and experience to effectively implement a broad range of enriching experiences such as pottery making, leadership development workshops, robotics, hands on technology classes and dance classes just to name a few.  Community Service Learning Projects encourage youth to become active participants in their communities. Mentors assist Raising Expectations participants with the development and implementation of service projects on a semi-annual basis.  The Educational Alliance describes the partnership between Raising Expectations, school administrators, teachers, counselors and parents. Building these partnerships enables Raising Expectations staff to serve as advocates for children, develop individualized academic learning plans that support educational goals for students with input from teachers, and help parents develop a clear understanding of their child’s performance in school.  Social Discovery Field trips expose participants to the world of field trip opportunities that exist beyond their neighborhoods and help to develop a broader perspective about the opportunities that exist in life. The Summer Pathfinder Program component provides students opportunities to attend unique summer camp programs and participate in job shadowing experiences with local companies and entrepreneurs during the summer months.  The intent is to expose Raising Expectations’ students to other youth representing other communities and with contrasting socio-economic realities.  When resources are secured,  RE staff members create and implement a 6 week thematic, experiential and project based summer camp that includes field trips, hands on learning activities, arts, STEM focused opportunities just to name a few.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

153672.19

Program 2

Project STEMWARE

Project STEMWARE (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math While Accomplishing Raised Expectations) RE 9th – 12th grade students participate in Math & Science strategic tutorials, college access coaching, mentoring and career exploration opportunities in the STEM fields.  Over the course of a school year students can receive 324 hours of direct and strategic support.  Additionally, RE participants enrolled in college receive mentoring, resource support and opportunities to remain engaged with RE programs when home for college breaks.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

101208.71

Program 3

Project RISE

Not available

Category

Elementary & Secondary Education

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

Budget

Service Areas

Self-reported

Georgia

For 20 years, Raising Expectations has provided impactful youth development programming for over 700 youth in Atlanta communities including Decatur, East Lake, Pittsburgh, Vine City, English Avenue, Washington Park, Simpson Rd. and Donald Lee Hollowell Pkwy Corridor.

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

RAISING EXPECTATIONS INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Raising Expectations Inc

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Principal Officer

Ms. Maria Armstrong

Co Principal Officer

Ms. Tangee L Allen

BIO

Maria Armstrong and Tangee Allen, both co-founders of Raising Expectations have extensive experience in the field of youth development and education. Both work in careers that involve children and youth and transfer this knowledge into their volunteer work with Raisng Expectations. They feel very strongly that the key to a child's success is surrounding them with people and experiences that reflect the possibilities available to succeed in the world. With numerous years with teaching and being an administrator in a public and charter school setting, the organization has been able to benefit and grow a solid foundation that garners results.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Craig DiVizzio

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?