Educational Institutions

Winter Park Public Library

  • Winter Park, FL
  • www.wppl.org

Mission Statement

The Winter Park Public Library improves the quality of life of Winter Park residents by responding to their changing needs for information, education, and entertainment.

Main Programs

  1. Circulation: Lending and Circulating Hard Copy and Online Materials
  2. Reference: Free and Guided Access to the Information Superhighway
  3. Youth Services: Engaging Young Minds and Building Literacy
  4. Winter Park History and Archives: Preserving Our Collective History
Service Areas

Self-reported

Florida

The Library was founded to primarily serve the residents of the City of Winter Park but as a member of the Central Florida community, we have registered borrowers from other Orange County cities as well as unincorporated Orange County and Seminole County.

ruling year

1955

Principal Officer since 2013

Self-reported

Ms. Shawn Shaffer

Keywords

Self-reported

adult education, children’s programs, Winter Park History Collection and Archive, reference and information, computer and Internet access

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Also Known As

Winter Park Public Library

EIN

59-0794396

 Number

4165308431

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Libraries, Library Science (B70)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

This is always a wonderful opportunity that I have to be able to share with you the accomplishments of the past year. 2014 was yet another year of many changes here at the library. It was the year we took a big step forward towards a new building and it was the year we got out into the community to tell our story and serve them better. No one works in a vacuum, and it's a testament to the wonderful teamwork that goes on here that we accomplished so much! Evelyn, Melissa and Nicole are here to help me this year with this report 2014 began with the closing of the Lifelong Learning Institute, but this year we established the Library Program Team and under Ruth's leadership we planned comprehensive, cohesive programming Library-wide for patrons of all ages at no cost. We began a trivia night at Marlowe's, hosted films for the Global Peace Film Festival, and began showing the latest releases on DVD at movies at midweek. 2014 was an exciting year in Adult Services as we began to offer new items and services. Developed a tablet checkout program offering iPads, Kindles and training to patrons.Offered WPPL's first ever Summer Reading program for adultsContinued working in adult programming.Weeded Reference and arranged the first floor to accommodate the Large Print and audiobook collection.Reference department was back at full staffing levels since 2013.Smith Grant was reinstated. In the area of technology we took a big forward leap and converted all staff and public computers to Office365, creating new capabilities and making Office 2013 available to the patrons for business and recreational use. We upgraded hardware and software on three Library computer servers from 2003 versions to 2012 giving faster service to staff and patrons, greater compatibility with newer software and more security. Technology changes continued to impact Circulation Services. They have the following highlights for 2014: Launched Checkout Bikes, offering one tandem and seven cruiser-style bikes to the public, offering a new service and generating good publicity for the WPPL.We Increased accessibility to and training for self-check stations, allowing patrons faster service more privacy and additional functionality (such as fine payment, book renewal and full lists of items checked out). Created a self-serve Holds Pick-up Shelf, adding convenience and speed to the patrons' check out process.Began e-mail renewal notices for patrons with cards that are about to expire. Implemented phone renewal of cards for resident borrowers, sparing them an additional trip to the Library or interruptions in service.We listened to patrons and lowered the late fee on DVDs, videogames and software to $1.00 per day We reassigned Alex Copeland to Community Relations as a graphic designer and under Mary Gail's direction have made great progress in new marketing designs. We implemented digital signage and providing over 200 unique slides promoting Library messages, programs and services. Mary Gail launched Library Twitter feed at https://twitter.com/WPPLibrary (follow at @WPPLibrary) as another way of promoting the Library to the community. We were selected as ""Best Nonprofit/Charity"" by our community in the Winter Chamber's Ovations awards. Thanks to Stacey and her dedicated team of volunteers we had a great Bash for Books, with a giant pirate ship that was the talk of Winter Park. Phyllis led several great events this year and a successful Annual Fund campaign. For the first time we ""crowd sourced"" a new drive up book drop. We held two author socials at the Westminster Winter Park and the Mayflower to extend our services and reinforce connections with patrons and friends who are not as able to visit our building. Phyllis worked with the Board's Development Committee to better formalize and structure the Library's fundraising efforts; held our first strategic planning session for development and focused efforts on long-range cultivation of major gifts. We held a reception at the home of Congressman and Mrs. John Mica to raise awareness for our fundraising efforts and the possibility of a new building campaign. Thanks to Pam Brandon we had a tremendously successful Books & Cooks author event attended by around 400 people at the Alfond Inn featuring local, regional and nationally known authors. It was followed by a talk-of-the-town ""after party"" at John Rivers test kitchen. One of the places in the library where we see the most impact is Youth Services. In 2014 some of the highlights are: Met with curriculum specialists at all Winter Park public elementary schools and some middle schools to build relationships and find new ways to serve Winter Park students, schools and teachers.Planned and executed a successful D.I.Y. Film Festival for Teens with over 21 entrants, giving talented young people an opportunity to showcase and be recognized for their creativity, artistry and skills.Hosted a very successful visit with Sunshine State Book author James Ponte, attracting tweens, teen and parents.Promoted our summer reading program and the benefits of library cards directly to targeted local schools by attending and issuing 58 cards at school events.Added a new dimension to Summer Reading with Summer Reading interns who listened to children talk about the books they read, gave out prizes and provided reading encouragement. This past year we completely revamped Library's financial recording, accounting and budgeting system to ensure a clean audit. We now have better controls over library spending and provide more transparency to staff regarding spending. We had the opportunity to work closely with the Library Facility Task Force to complete a comprehensive report used to convince the Winter Park City Commission of the need for a new building as well as to provide options for location, costs and funding strategies. The end result was an agreement on the part of the Commission that the Library is in need of new/renovated facilities, support for continuing the work of the Task Force, and agreeing to an initial City investment of $15,000,000 toward the endeavor. As I said last year, Bob always started these reports talking about the history of the library. Two of the important building block supporters of the Winter Park Public Library were Rachel and Kenneth Murrah. Under Rachel's leadership we moved into this building in the 1970s. Rachel and Ken started an endowment that purchases most of our fiction in formats that Rachel couldn't have imagined. And now Kenneth's final wish was to help us move into the next building that will provide the public library services for future generations. His loss this past year can't be measured. 2015 is the Year of the Hero. The Board of Trustees are our heroes. Without your support, wisdom and donations of your time, talent and treasures we couldn't provide these much needed services for the people of Winter Park.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Circulation: Lending and Circulating Hard Copy and Online Materials

TheCirculation Desk is the main point of service where patrons check out and return materials housed at the Winter Park Public Library. In addition to our physical collection of 140,000 books, magazines, DVDs, software and music, patrons can access more than 50,0000 titles online that can be downloaded to a variety of digital devices. Each day, at this university for the people, nearly 800 area residents cross our threshold to find resources that educate, entertain and/or enlighten. Our circulation staff helps patrons locate and check out 650,000 materials each year and, through our homebound program, delivers materials to city residents in need. With more than 11,700 cardholders, the Winter Park Public Library is one of the city's most widely utilized and, according to city surveys, highly valued resources. Residents of Orange County and Maitland receive reciprocal borrowing privileges here at our Library, and hundreds of people who do not reside inWinter Park purchase our library cards because they so highly value our services.

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Adults

Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)

Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Budget

$512,635.00

Program 2

Reference: Free and Guided Access to the Information Superhighway

The Reference Desk is at the heart of our Library, where professional librarians serve as guides, advisors and educators for people from all walks of life. As a member of the Ask-A-Librarian consortium, our masters-level librarians are available seven days a week to answers to resident questions on almost any topic. In this world of information overload, our reference staff provides access to and expertise on print and electronic resources that, in many cases, are lifelines for library users. Nearly 30,000 people last year used our public access computers. These numbers increased dramatically during the economic downturn as area residents turned to the Library for electronic access and employment searches. We anticipate that these numbers will continue to rise as more government programs move to online application processes and more employers require an online presence. Government agencies are suggesting that people visit their local libraries for assistance with online applications. We are the only place in town where computer use, individual assistance and classes are free and available for all residents.

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Adults

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

$311,157.00

Program 3

Youth Services: Engaging Young Minds and Building Literacy

Our Youth Services Department is a vibrant, happy place where children up to age 18 build their literacy skills and develop a love for reading. With programs geared to the special needs of each age group, children and families engage with literature and in literary activities that inspire a passion for lifelong learning. More than half of all programs and materials that circulate out of this Library are generated by our children's programs. A few of our youth services librarians have worked here long enough to have conducted storytimes for the parents of current patrons. They are beloved resources in our community who, through year-round and summer reading programs, tailor services to the changing needs of our city's youth. All services are free and open to area residents.

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Infants/Babies (under age 5)

Budget

$259,505.00

Program 4

Winter Park History and Archives: Preserving Our Collective History

The Winter Park History and Archives Collection exists to acquire, preserve, and make available to the inquiring public information about or by the City ofWinter Parkand its residents. In addition to collecting pieces ofWinter Parkhistory through donations, History and Archives holds original works written, drawn or sculpted by residents ofWinter Park. It is also the holding place for results of the Smith Grant - an annual research award co-managed by the Library with Olin Library atRollinsCollege. The grant is named after a formerRollinsCollegeprofessor and his wife - Dorothy Lockhart & RheaMarshSmith - supporters of history and the arts. We invite you to take a step back in time and visit earlyWinter Park: http://www.wppl.org/wphistory/index.html.

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Adults

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Other Named Groups

Budget

$49,452.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Many people believe that libraries are going the way of the dinosaur, to extinction. They believe this because they think libraries are only about books. We were never in the book business. We have always been in the education business. We connect people with information. The information they need when they need it. With the explosion of information on the Internet, you can be overwhelmed by the amount of it. We can help you find the right resources, reliable information and save you time. We teach people to read and we support their learning endeavors all of their lives.We teach people skills they need to succeed. Whether it is how to write a resume or how to use a 3d printer, we are there to help people learn, grow.No one person can own all the history of human knowledge. As many books as you can buy on Amazon, libraries have more. And for those who can't afford computers, tablets and books we are here to lend those resources to everyone. We are a community gathering place. This past year we held the only debate between two candidates running for a City Commissioner position. We bring together people of all points of view for education and instruction.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    We continue to purchase resources that serve the needs of our patrons in many different formats.We offer many educational opportunities ourselves and we partner with others to provide the best educational experiences for others.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    We receive support from the City of Winter Park, but we also depend on our annual fund drive, our fundraiser, Bash for Books and other grants. What we are able to provide is directly related to our financial support. We have spent the last year partnering with other local organizations so that we can all provide better services.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    We use statistical data about material circulation, traffic in our building and attendance at our programs.Some of the best indicators are personal stories. This year a woman came to us for help in how to use a computer. She needed to fill out forms and improve her skills. She came back to tell us that she got a job that radically changed her life. She felt she owed this new job to the help she received from the library.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Every year we improve the number of materials we circulate and the number of people who use our services. We just completed a grant program from the Pauline H. Mossman Winter Park Fund of the Winter Park Community Foundation in December 2014. This grant purchased Kindle Fires and iPad minis. We circulated these devices to patrons and taught older adults how to use these devices. Through one on one instruction and classes we had more than 637 learning sessions with patrons. This program improved lives of those who would not otherwise have access to these devices. Because they could check out devices and use them at their own pace, some people were able to make very informed buying decisions for their own devices.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Florida

The Library was founded to primarily serve the residents of the City of Winter Park but as a member of the Central Florida community, we have registered borrowers from other Orange County cities as well as unincorporated Orange County and Seminole County.

Funding Needs

5 most pressing needs: In 2015 the current building does not support the electronic needs for our patrons. There is a lack of electrical outlets, out dated plumbing and fixed walls that don't allow us to create new spaces. We urgently need to remodel or building a new building. Since it will take 3 to 5 years to plan and implement an expansion, there are also capital projects that need to be accomplished to better utilize our existing space. We would like to expand our digital offerings into online magazine subscriptions and streaming video The endowment needs to be added to through an endowment campaign and through planned giving.The Library relies heavily on computers, software, and access to materials in electronic formats. We need sufficient funding to maintain the most powerful hardware possible along with software and software maintenance funding and funding for proprietary databases and electronic books. There has been no replacement of key pieces of equipment for many years. We are reaching a critical point in the age of our equipment. We also have a program of digitizing information in our Winter Park History and Archives collection that is then made available on the Internet. This helps preserve the physical documents and increases access to them. The program could be expanded with additional funding for dedicated staff.

Accreditations

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

WINTER PARK LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
Fiscal year: Oct 01-Sep 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Winter Park Public Library

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Principal Officer

Ms. Shawn Shaffer

BIO

Shawn Shaffer became the 16th library director of Winter Park Public Library in May, 2013. She comes to Winter Park with over 30 years' experience in libraries. Her diverse background includes work in medical and academic libraries as well as public libraries. She uses these varied experiences from direct patron services to managerial positions to continuously improve the services and the experiences library patrons have. She brings experience in strategic planning, policy making, budgeting and a strong background in implementing technology. During her tenure at Elmwood Park material circulation more than doubled and almost 1,000 people come to that library's every day. She has many exciting plans for the future of Winter Park Public Library. In addition she is also an instructor in the College of Dupage's LTA program.

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

"The fact that the Winter Park Public Library is a no--for-profit corporation makes it unique. The 30% of our budget we raise ourselves provides for the margin of excellence that the residents of Winter Park are accustomed to receive. We have a dedicated Board of Trustees who value the Library's contribution to the residents and who work tirelessly to ensure that we continue to provide high levels of services and collections.We are excited about the prospect of providing new and traditional library services for the digital age. "

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ms. Marina Nice

Sun Trust

Term: Feb 2016 - Jan 2017

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?